Dieppe Raid

DieppeOperation Jubileeraid on DieppeBattle of DieppeJubileelandings at DieppeDieppe landingDieppe Operation1942 commando raidAllied landing in France
Operation Jubilee, more commonly referred to as the Dieppe Raid, was an Allied assault on the German-occupied port of Dieppe, France, on 19 August 1942, during the Second World War.wikipedia
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Amphibious warfare

amphibiousamphibious assaultamphibious landing
This was accompanied by development of techniques and equipment for amphibious warfare.
Amphibious operations can be classified as tactical or operational raids such as the Dieppe Raid, operational landings in support of a larger land strategy such as the Kerch–Eltigen Operation, and a strategic opening of a new Theatre of Operations, for example the Operation Avalanche.

Royal Marines

Royal MarinemarinesMarine
Over 6,050 infantrymen, predominantly Canadian, were supported by The Calgary Regiment of the 1st Canadian Tank Brigade and a strong force of Royal Navy and smaller Royal Air Force landing contingents.
The Royal Marines formed one Commando (A Commando) which served at Dieppe.

Canada

CanadianCANCanadians
It involved 5,000 Canadians, 1,000 British troops, and 50 United States Army Rangers.
Canadian troops played important roles in many key battles of the war, including the failed 1942 Dieppe Raid, the Allied invasion of Italy, the Normandy landings, the Battle of Normandy, and the Battle of the Scheldt in 1944.

1st Canadian Armoured Brigade

1st Canadian Tank Brigade1st Canadian Army Tank BrigadeCanadian
Over 6,050 infantrymen, predominantly Canadian, were supported by The Calgary Regiment of the 1st Canadian Tank Brigade and a strong force of Royal Navy and smaller Royal Air Force landing contingents.
The Calgary Regiment participated in the disastrous Dieppe landing in 1942.

United States Army Rangers

RangerU.S. Army RangersArmy Ranger
It involved 5,000 Canadians, 1,000 British troops, and 50 United States Army Rangers.
A select fifty or so of the first U.S. Rangers were dispersed through the British Commandos for the Dieppe Raid in August 1942; these were the first American soldiers to see ground combat in the European theater.

Operation Overlord

Battle of NormandyNormandyNormandy Campaign
The events at Dieppe influenced preparations for the North African (Operation Torch) and Normandy landings (Operation Overlord).
In part because of lessons learned in the Dieppe Raid of 19 August 1942, the Allies decided not to directly assault a heavily defended French seaport in their first landing.

No. 4 Commando

4 CommandoNo.4 Commando4
The parachute operation was later cancelled and instead No. 3 Commando and No. 4 Commando landed by sea and attacked the artillery batteries.
4 was one of three commando units selected for the Dieppe raid.

Dieppe

Dieppe, Seine-MaritimeDieppe, FranceDieppe (Seine-Maritime)
Operation Jubilee, more commonly referred to as the Dieppe Raid, was an Allied assault on the German-occupied port of Dieppe, France, on 19 August 1942, during the Second World War.
The destruction of the casino had only begun at the time of the Dieppe Raid.

No. 3 Commando

3 Commando3No. 3 (Army) Commando
The parachute operation was later cancelled and instead No. 3 Commando and No. 4 Commando landed by sea and attacked the artillery batteries.
In 1941 they were involved in successful raids on the Lofoten Islands and Vaagso, in Norway, before taking part in the costly Dieppe raid in August 1942, where the unit was tasked with knocking out a German coastal artillery battery on the eastern flank of the main landings, although due to a chance encounter in the Channel with a German convoy, a large majority of the unit failed to make it ashore.

2nd Canadian Division during World War II

2nd Canadian Infantry Division2ndCanadian 2nd Infantry Division
Under pressure from the Canadian government to ensure that Canadian troops saw some action, the 2nd Canadian Infantry Division, commanded by Major General John Hamilton Roberts, was selected for the main force.
Having performed well in training exercises during 1941 and early 1942, elements of the 2nd Division were selected as the main force for Operation Jubilee, a large-scale amphibious raid on the port of Dieppe in German-occupied France.

Seine-Maritime

Seine-InférieureSeine MaritimeSeine Inférieure
Dieppe, a coastal town in the Seine-Inférieure department of France, is built along a long cliff that overlooks the English Channel.

Normandy landings

D-DayD-Day landingsOperation Neptune
The events at Dieppe influenced preparations for the North African (Operation Torch) and Normandy landings (Operation Overlord).
Alarmed by the raids on St Nazaire and Dieppe in 1942, Hitler had ordered the construction of fortifications all along the Atlantic coast, from Spain to Norway, to protect against an expected Allied invasion.

Landing craft tank

LCTtank landing craftLCTs
Armoured support was provided by the 14th Army Tank Regiment (The Calgary Regiment (Tank)) with 58 of the new Churchill tanks, to be delivered using the new landing craft tank (LCT).
Testing during the Dieppe Raid in 1942 revealed a lack of maneuverability, so further versions were shorter in length.

Louis Mountbatten, 1st Earl Mountbatten of Burma

Lord MountbattenLouis MountbattenLord Louis Mountbatten
The Dieppe raid was a major operation planned by Vice-Admiral Lord Mountbatten of Combined Operations Headquarters, involving an attacking force of about 5,000 Canadians, 1,000 British troops and 50 United States Army Rangers.
After these two successes came the Dieppe Raid of 19 August 1942.

RAF Fighter Command

Fighter CommandFighterFighter squadron
After its victory in the Battle of Britain in 1940 and the Luftwaffe having switched to night bombing in the fall of 1940, the day fighters of the Royal Air Force's Fighter Command were "a force without a mission".
The most notable offensive battle took place over Dieppe, France when an ill-fated commando-style raid was mounted there in August 1942 (Dieppe Raid).

The Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders of Canada

Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders of CanadaQueen's Own Cameron Highlanders79th Cameron Highlanders of Canada
The South Saskatchewan Regiment and the Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders of Canada would land on Green beach, and No.
On 19 August 1942, the Camerons landed in occupied Europe as part of Operation Jubilee, the raid on the French port of Dieppe.

Combined Operations Headquarters

Combined OperationsCombined Operations Pilotage PartiesChief of Combined Operations
The Dieppe raid was a major operation planned by Vice-Admiral Lord Mountbatten of Combined Operations Headquarters, involving an attacking force of about 5,000 Canadians, 1,000 British troops and 50 United States Army Rangers. In the immediate aftermath of the evacuation of the British Expeditionary Forces from Dunkirk in May 1940, the British started on the development of a substantial raiding force under the umbrella of Combined Operations Headquarters.

Berneval-le-Grand

Berneval
In 1942, the Germans had demolished some seafront buildings to aid in coastal defence and had set up two large artillery batteries at Berneval-le-Grand and Varengeville-sur-Mer.
On the morning of 19 August 1942, the beach at Berneval was one of the landing locations of the Anglo-Canadian raid on Dieppe.

Churchill tank

ChurchillChurchill AVREChurchill tanks
Armoured support was provided by the 14th Army Tank Regiment (The Calgary Regiment (Tank)) with 58 of the new Churchill tanks, to be delivered using the new landing craft tank (LCT).
In the same year, the Churchill was also used at the Dieppe Raid.

English Channel

Channelthe Channelcross-channel
Dieppe, a coastal town in the Seine-Inférieure department of France, is built along a long cliff that overlooks the English Channel.
Dieppe was the site of an ill-fated Dieppe Raid by Canadian and British armed forces.

302nd Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

302nd Static Infantry Division302nd302nd Infantry Division
Dieppe and the flanking cliffs were well defended; the 1,500-strong garrison from the 302nd Static Infantry Division comprised the 570th, 571st and 572nd Infantry Regiments, each of two battalions, the 302nd Artillery Regiment, the 302nd Reconnaissance Battalion, the 302nd Anti-tank Battalion, the 302nd Engineer Battalion and 302nd Signal Battalion.
An Allied amphibious raid, to determine if a large landing could be attempted, was made at Dieppe, France on 19 August 1942.

HMS Brocklesby (L42)

HMS ''Brocklesby
The Allied destroyers HMS Brocklesby and ORP Ślązak noticed the engagement, but their commanders incorrectly assumed that the landing craft had come under fire from the shore batteries and did not come to their rescue.
She served during the Second World War, spending much of the time in the English Channel and Mediterranean, taking part in the Dieppe Raid in 1942, and the Allied landings in Sicily and at Salerno in 1943.

Hunt-class destroyer

HuntType II Hunt-classType I Hunt-class
However, pre-landing naval gunfire support was limited, consisting of six Hunt-class destroyers with 4 inch(102mm) guns.

John Durnford-Slater

John
The mission for Lieutenant Colonel John Durnford-Slater and No.
Commanding No. 3 Commando he participated in raids on Guernsey, the Lofoten Islands, Vaagso, Dieppe and Sicily.

John Hamilton Roberts

J. H. RobertsJohn Roberts
Under pressure from the Canadian government to ensure that Canadian troops saw some action, the 2nd Canadian Infantry Division, commanded by Major General John Hamilton Roberts, was selected for the main force.
Roberts was put in charge of the ground troops for the raid against Dieppe, on August 19, 1942.