Digital Economy Act 2017

obsolete'.Digital Economy ActDigital Economy Act (2017)Digital Economy Bill
The Digital Economy Act 2017 is an act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom.wikipedia
70 Related Articles

Ofcom

Radio AuthorityOffice of CommunicationsOffice of Communications (Ofcom)
Allowing Ofcom, the communications sector's regulator, to financially penalise communications providers for failing to comply with licence commitments.
The Digital Economy Act 2017 extended Ofcom's remit and powers.

British Board of Film Classification

BBFCBritish Board of Film Censors15
Creating an age-verification regulator to publish guidelines about how pornographic websites which operate "on a commercial basis" should ensure their users are aged 18 or older. The regulator is empowered to fine those who fail to comply up to £250,000 (or up to 5% of their turnover), to order the blocking of non-compliant websites, and to require those providing financial or advertising services to non-compliant websites to cease doing so. The regulator's proposals have to be approved three months before coming into effect. The BBFC has been commissioned to fulfil this role and age-verification is expected to begin in 2018. In November 2016, following pressure from MPs, the government proposed an amendment to the bill to allow the age verification regulator to require internet service providers to block pornographic websites that do not offer age verification. As the BBFC were expected to become the regulator, this caused discussion about ISPs being required to block content that is prohibited even under an R18 certificate, the prohibition of some of which is itself controversial.
The introduction of such a regulator was a consequence of the Digital Economy Act 2017.

Digital Economy Act 2010

Digital Economy BillDigital Economy Act
It is substantially different from, and shorter than, the Digital Economy Act 2010, whose provisions largely ended up not being passed into law.
This legislation was updated by the Digital Economy Act 2017, which updates the anti-infringement provisions of existing laws, creates or updates criminal copyright breach provisions, and provides for a wider range of sentencing for criminal infringement.

Louise Haigh

Louise '''Haigh
An amendment to the bill was tabled by the shadow minister for digital economy Louise Haigh, extending the legal obligation on television broadcasters to include subtitles, sign language and audio description when providing video on demand. A government amendment to the same effect was subsequently published by the minister responsible for digital policy Matthew Hancock and became part of the act.
Haigh served in this role during the passage of the Digital Economy Act (2017) and introduced a number of amendments, including an obligation for television broadcasters to include subtitles and closed captioning in on-demand content online which was adopted by a subsequent Government amendment.

Age verification system

adult verification systemage verification methodsappropriately aged
Myles Jackman, ORG's legal director, highlighted the potential vulnerability of age verification systems to hacking, and suggested that it would result in more people using virtual private networks, or anonymous web browsers such as Tor.
In the United Kingdom, the Digital Economy Act 2017 will require websites publishing porn commercially to employ an age verification system, with the British Board of Film Classification tasked in enforcing the provisions.

R18 (British Board of Film Classification)

R18 certificateR18R18-rated
In November 2016, following pressure from MPs, the government proposed an amendment to the bill to allow the age verification regulator to require internet service providers to block pornographic websites that do not offer age verification. As the BBFC were expected to become the regulator, this caused discussion about ISPs being required to block content that is prohibited even under an R18 certificate, the prohibition of some of which is itself controversial.
The Digital Economy Act 2017 includes powers to require age-verification for pornographic Internet sites and the government accepted an amendment to allow the regulator to require ISPs to block access to non-compliant sites.

Parliament of the United Kingdom

ParliamentUK ParliamentBritish Parliament
The Digital Economy Act 2017 is an act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom.

Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport

Culture SecretarySecretary of State for National HeritageSec. of State
It was introduced to Parliament by culture secretary John Whittingdale on 5 July 2016.

John Whittingdale

John Whittingdale MPJohn '''Whittingdale John Flasby Lawrance Whittingdale
It was introduced to Parliament by culture secretary John Whittingdale on 5 July 2016.

E-government

eGovernmentWebsiteelectronic government
Allowing data sharing between government departments in order to provide Digital Government.

Pornography

pornographicpornadult film industry
Creating an age-verification regulator to publish guidelines about how pornographic websites which operate "on a commercial basis" should ensure their users are aged 18 or older. The regulator is empowered to fine those who fail to comply up to £250,000 (or up to 5% of their turnover), to order the blocking of non-compliant websites, and to require those providing financial or advertising services to non-compliant websites to cease doing so. The regulator's proposals have to be approved three months before coming into effect. The BBFC has been commissioned to fulfil this role and age-verification is expected to begin in 2018.

Internet service provider

ISPinternet service providersISPs
Requiring Internet service providers to use Internet filters to block all websites that have adult content, unless customers have opted out.

Universal service

universal service obligationuniversal postal service
Introducing a Universal Service Obligation which allows users to request broadband speeds of at least 10 Mbps. The obligation is to be introduced by 2020, and Ofcom are empowered to subsequently increase the minimum broadband speed requirement.

Mobile telephony

mobile communicationmobile telecommunicationsmobile communications
Requiring mobile telephony providers to offer a contract cap to customers limiting monthly spending to an agreed figure.

Nuisance call

telephone harassmentcallsnuisance calls
Providing for increased penalties for nuisance calls.

Telephone company

telecommunications companytelephone companiestelco
Updating the Ofcom Electronic Communications Code to make it easier for telecommunications companies to erect and extend mobile masts.

Public Lending Right

Public Lending Right (PLR) in 1975Public Lending Right Commissionpublic lending rights
Extending Public Lending Right to remotely lent e-books (section 31 of the Act).

Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988

1988 Copyright ActBritish lawCopyright Act
Modifying the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988 to raise the maximum sentence for Internet copyright infringement to 10 years in prison, and allowing English and Welsh courts a greater range of sentencing options in such cases.

Copyright infringement

piracysoftware piracypirated
Modifying the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988 to raise the maximum sentence for Internet copyright infringement to 10 years in prison, and allowing English and Welsh courts a greater range of sentencing options in such cases.

BBC

British Broadcasting Corporationthe BBCBBC Music
Giving Ofcom oversight of the BBC as its external regulator.

Public broadcasting

public radiopublic televisionpublic
Empowering Ofcom to require public service broadcasters to include a minimum quantity of children's programming made in the United Kingdom.

House of Commons of the United Kingdom

House of CommonsCommonsparliamentary
The bill completed its passage through the House of Commons during the Autumn of 2016.

Royal assent

assentassentedassented to
Royal Assent was achieved by the end of Spring 2017.