Dime novel

dime novelsBeadle and Adamsdime-novelcheap paperback copiesDime Novelistsdime novels styledime store novelnickel weekliesshockerwestern adventure novels
The dime novel is a form of late 19th-century and early 20th-century U.S. popular fiction issued in series of inexpensive paperbound editions.wikipedia
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Pulp magazine

pulp fictionpulppulp novel
The term dime novel has been used as a catchall term for several different but related forms, referring to story papers, five- and ten-cent weeklies, "thick book" reprints, and sometimes early pulp magazines.
Pulps were the successors to the penny dreadfuls, dime novels, and short-fiction magazines of the 19th century.

Ann S. Stephens

Ann Sophia Stephens
The first book in the Beadle series was Malaeska, the Indian Wife of the White Hunter, by Ann S. Stephens, dated June 9, 1860.
She was the author of dime novels and is credited as the progenitor of that genre.

Nick Carter (literary character)

Nick CarterJohn Russell Coryelldetective Nick Carter
Nick Carter first appeared in 1886 in the New York Weekly.
Nick Carter is a fictional character that began as a dime novel private detective in 1886 and has appeared in a variety of formats over more than a century.

Frank Reade

Frank Reade and his Electric ManLost in a Comet's Tail; or, Frank Reade, Jr.'s Strange Adventure with His New Air-Ship
The original Frank Reade stories first appeared in Boys of New York.
Frank Reade was the protagonist of a series of dime novels published primarily for boys.

Frank Tousey

One of the most successful titles, Frank Tousey's New York Detective Library eventually came to alternate stories of the James Gang with stories of Old King Brady, detective, and (in a rare occurrence in the dime novel) several stories which featured both, with Old King Brady doggedly on the trail of the vicious gang.
Frank Tousey (1853–1902) was among the top five publishers of dime novels in the late 1800s and early 1900s.

Frank Merriwell

The Adventures of Frank MerriwellYoung Frank Merriwell
Such titles as New Nick Carter Weekly (continuing the original black-and-white Nick Carter Library), Tip-Top Weekly (introducing Frank Merriwell) and others were 7 x 10 inches with thirty-two pages of text, but the 8.5 x 11 Tousey format carried the day, and Street & Smith soon followed suit.
The character appeared in over 200 dime novels between 1896 and 1930 (some between 1927 and 1930 were written by other authors with the same pen name), numerous radio dramas in 1934 and again from 1946 through 1949, a comic strip from 1928 through 1936, a comic book (four issues) Frank Merriwell At Yale, and a 12-chapter serialized film in 1936.

Argosy (magazine)

ArgosyAll-Story WeeklyArgosy All-Story Weekly
In 1896, Frank Munsey had converted his juvenile magazine Argosy into a fiction magazine for adults, the first of the pulp magazines.
Prior to World War One, The Argosy had several notable writers, including Upton Sinclair, Zane Grey, Albert Payson Terhune, Gertrude Barrows Bennett (under the pseudonym Francis Stevens), and former dime novelist William Wallace Cook.

Detective Story Magazine

Detective Story
In 1910, Street and Smith converted two of their nickel weeklies, New Tip Top Weekly and Top Notch Magazine, into pulps; in 1915, Nick Carter Stories, itself a replacement for the New Nick Carter Weekly, became Detective Story Magazine, and in 1919, New Buffalo Bill Weekly became Western Story Magazine.
While the publication was the publishing house's first detective-fiction pulp magazine in a format resembling a modern paperback (a "thick book" in dime-novel parlance), Street & Smith had only recently ceased publication of the dime-novel series Nick Carter Weekly, which concerned the adventures of a young detective.

Western Story Magazine

In 1910, Street and Smith converted two of their nickel weeklies, New Tip Top Weekly and Top Notch Magazine, into pulps; in 1915, Nick Carter Stories, itself a replacement for the New Nick Carter Weekly, became Detective Story Magazine, and in 1919, New Buffalo Bill Weekly became Western Story Magazine.
Western Story Magazine began when Street & Smith executive Henry Ralston decided to convert one of the company's nickel weeklies, New Buffalo Bill Weekly, into a pulp.

Story paper

story paperspapersSunday Fiction Magazine
The term dime novel has been used as a catchall term for several different but related forms, referring to story papers, five- and ten-cent weeklies, "thick book" reprints, and sometimes early pulp magazines.

William J. Benners

William James Benners, Jr. (1863-1940) was a writer, publisher and historian of dime novels which was a class of popular fiction that flourished in the mid- and late-nineteenth century and into the early twentieth century.

Street & Smith

Street and SmithStreet & Smith Publications, Inc.Street & Smith Publications
Street & Smith or Street & Smith Publications, Inc. was a New York City publisher specializing in inexpensive paperbacks and magazines referred to as dime novels and pulp fiction.

Eugene T. Sawyer

Eugene Taylor Sawyer (November 11, 1846 – October 30, 1924) was a newspaper editor and author of dime novels, particularly for the Nick Carter series.

Penny dreadful

penny dreadfulsJack Harkawaypenny fiction
Appearing in the 1860s, American dime novels were edited and rewritten for a British audience.

Potboiler

potboilerspot-boilersfor bread
In the modern age, the term dime novel has been used to refer to quickly written, lurid potboilers, usually as a pejorative to describe a sensationalized but superficial literary work.

Pejorative

derogatoryslurderogatory term
In the modern age, the term dime novel has been used to refer to quickly written, lurid potboilers, usually as a pejorative to describe a sensationalized but superficial literary work.

American Civil War

Civil WarU.S. Civil WarUnited States Civil War
The literacy rate increased around the time of the American Civil War, and Beadle's Dime Novels were immediately popular among young, working-class readers.

Alexis de Tocqueville

Tocquevillede TocquevilleAlexis de Toqueville
Author Armin Jaemmrich observes that Alexis de Tocqueville's theses in Democracy in America (1835) says that in democratic and socially permeable societies, like that of the U.S., the lower classes were not "naturally indifferent to science, literature, and the arts: only it must be acknowledged that they cultivate them after their own fashion, and bring to the task their own peculiar qualifications and deficiencies."

Democracy in America

De La Démocratie en Amériquechronicled themDe la démocratie en Amerique
Author Armin Jaemmrich observes that Alexis de Tocqueville's theses in Democracy in America (1835) says that in democratic and socially permeable societies, like that of the U.S., the lower classes were not "naturally indifferent to science, literature, and the arts: only it must be acknowledged that they cultivate them after their own fashion, and bring to the task their own peculiar qualifications and deficiencies."

New York Weekly

New York DispatchNew York Weekly Dispatch
Nick Carter first appeared in 1886 in the New York Weekly.

Fame and Fortune Weekly

Tousey had his "big six": Work and Win (featuring Fred Fearnot, a serious rival to the soon-to-be-popular Frank Merriwell), Secret Service, Pluck and Luck, Wild West Weekly, Fame and Fortune Weekly, and The Liberty Boys of '76, each of which issued over a thousand copies weekly.