Dinah Washington

DinahDinah Was: The Dinah Washington MusicalRuth Lee Jones
Dinah Washington (born Ruth Lee Jones; August 29, 1924 – December 14, 1963) was an American singer and pianist, who has been cited as "the most popular black female recording artist of the '50s".wikipedia
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Jazz

jazz musicContemporary jazzModern Jazz
Primarily a jazz vocalist, she performed and recorded in a wide variety of styles including blues, R&B, and traditional pop music, and gave herself the title of "Queen of the Blues".
Although Betty Carter, Ella Fitzgerald, Adelaide Hall, Billie Holiday, Abbey Lincoln, Anita O'Day, Dinah Washington, and Ethel Waters were recognized for their vocal talent, less familiar were bandleaders, composers, and instrumentalists such as pianist Lil Hardin Armstrong and songwriters Irene Higginbotham and Dorothy Fields.

The Regal Theater (Chicago, Illinois)

Regal TheaterRegal TheatreRegal
Her involvement with the gospel choir occurred after she won an amateur contest at Chicago's Regal Theater where she sang "I Can't Face the Music".
Nat "King" Cole, Cab Calloway, Louis Armstrong, Ella Fitzgerald, Sarah Vaughan, Lena Horne, Dinah Washington, Miles Davis, Sammy Davis Jr., Lionel Hampton, Dizzy Gillespie, and Duke Ellington performed frequently at the theater through the 1920s and 1940s.

Leonard Feather

Feather, LeonardFeatherLeonard G. Feather
She made her recording debut for the Keynote label that December with "Evil Gal Blues", written by Leonard Feather and backed by Hampton and musicians from his band, including Joe Morris (trumpet) and Milt Buckner (piano).
Feather's compositions have been widely recorded, including "Evil Gal Blues" and "Blowtop Blues" by Dinah Washington, and what is possibly his biggest hit, "How Blue Can You Get?"

Lionel Hampton

Lionel Hampton OrchestraLionel Hampton and his OrchestraHampton
She credited Joe Sherman with suggesting the change from Ruth Jones, made before Lionel Hampton came to hear Dinah at the Garrick. Also featured on the same day were Lionel Hampton, PeeWee Crayton's Orchestra, Roy Milton and his Orchestra, Tiny Davis and Her Hell Divers, and other artists.
Dinah Washington, Roy Milton, PeeWee Crayton, Lillie Greenwood, Tiny Davis an Her Hell Divers were also featured.

Baby Get Lost

Both "Am I Asking Too Much" (1948) and "Baby Get Lost" (1949) reached Number 1 on the R&B chart, and her version of "I Wanna Be Loved" (1950) crossed over to reach Number 22 on the US pop chart.
"Baby Get Lost" is a July 1949 single by Dinah Washington (Mercury 8148).

Dinah Jams

At the same time as her biggest popular success, she also recorded sessions with many leading jazz musicians, including Clifford Brown and Clark Terry on the album Dinah Jams (1954), and also recorded with Cannonball Adderley and Ben Webster.
Dinah Jams is a 1955 live album by vocalist Dinah Washington.

Joe Morris (trumpeter)

Joe Morris
She made her recording debut for the Keynote label that December with "Evil Gal Blues", written by Leonard Feather and backed by Hampton and musicians from his band, including Joe Morris (trumpet) and Milt Buckner (piano).
Born in Montgomery, Alabama, Morris began his career as a jazz trumpeter, working and recording with Earl Bostic, Milt Buckner, Arnett Cobb, Dizzy Gillespie, Johnny Griffin, Buddy Rich, Dinah Washington, Big Joe Turner, and Lionel Hampton.

Mercury Records

MercuryMercury FranceMercury Classics
She stayed with Hampton's band until 1946, after the Keynote label folded, signed for Mercury Records as a solo singer.
Mercury, under its EmArcy label, released LPs by many important post-swing and bebop artists including Clifford Brown and Max Roach, Clark Terry, Dinah Washington, Nat and Cannonball Adderley, Ernestine Anderson, Sarah Vaughan, Maynard Ferguson, Jimmy Cleveland, Herb Geller and others.

Apollo Records (1944)

ApolloApollo RecordsApollo label
In December 1945 she made a series of twelve recordings for Apollo Records, 10 of which were issued, featuring the "Lucky Thompson All Stars."
Apollo recorded rhythm and blues singers Dinah Washington and Wynonie Harris before they became famous on other labels.

Alabama Jazz Hall of Fame

She was a 1986 inductee of the Alabama Jazz Hall of Fame, and was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1993.

Gerald Wilson

Gerald Wilson Big BandGerald Wilson OrchestraGerald Stanley Wilson
Also performing that day were Little Richard, The Mel Williams Dots, Julie Stevens, Chuck Higgin's Orchestra, Bo Rhambo, Willie Hayden & Five Black Birds, The Premiers, Gerald Wilson and His 20-Pc.
In addition to being a band leader, Wilson wrote arrangements for Duke Ellington, Sarah Vaughan, Ray Charles, Julie London, Dizzy Gillespie, Ella Fitzgerald, Benny Carter, Lionel Hampton, Billie Holiday, Dinah Washington, and Nancy Wilson.

Belford Hendricks

Her band at that time included arranger Belford Hendricks, with Kenny Burrell (guitar), Joe Zawinul (piano), and Panama Francis (drums).
His versatility allowed him to write in various styles, from big band swing for Count Basie, through blues ballads for Dinah Washington and Sarah Vaughan, R&B-influenced pop for Benton and country and western numbers for Nat King Cole and Al Martino, to early soul for Aretha Franklin.

I Understand (1941 song)

I UnderstandI Understand" (1941 song)
Club owner Joe Sherman was so impressed with her singing of "I Understand", backed by the Cats and the Fiddle, who were appearing in the Garrick's upstairs room, that he hired her.

Cavalcade of Jazz

Washington came back to perform at the twelfth Cavalcade of Jazz also at Wrigley Field in Los Angeles on September 2, 1956.
The Cavalcade of Jazz concerts were the stepping stone to success for such stars as Toni Harper, Dinah Washington, Roy Milton, Frankie Lane and others.

Joe Zawinul

Josef ZawinulZawinulZawinul Syndicate
Her band at that time included arranger Belford Hendricks, with Kenny Burrell (guitar), Joe Zawinul (piano), and Panama Francis (drums).
He then accompanied Dinah Washington.

Little Richard

Richard PennimanPennimanRichard Wayne Penniman
Also performing that day were Little Richard, The Mel Williams Dots, Julie Stevens, Chuck Higgin's Orchestra, Bo Rhambo, Willie Hayden & Five Black Birds, The Premiers, Gerald Wilson and His 20-Pc.
Also performing that day were Dinah Washington, The Mel Williams Dots, Julie Stevens, Chuck Higgin's Orchestra, Bo Rhambo, Willie Hayden & Five Black Birds, The Premiers, Gerald Wilson and His 20-Pc.

Tuscaloosa, Alabama

TuscaloosaTuscaloosa, ALAlabama
Ruth Lee Jones was born in Tuscaloosa, Alabama to Alice Jones, and moved to Chicago as a child.

I Wanna Be Loved

Both "Am I Asking Too Much" (1948) and "Baby Get Lost" (1949) reached Number 1 on the R&B chart, and her version of "I Wanna Be Loved" (1950) crossed over to reach Number 22 on the US pop chart.

Baby (You've Got What It Takes)

You've Got What It Takes
She followed it up with a version of Irving Gordon's "Unforgettable", and then two highly successful duets in 1960 with Brook Benton, "Baby (You've Got What It Takes)" (No.
In January 1960, Brook Benton partnered with Dinah Washington to record the song as "BABY, You've Got What It Takes".

Leon Hefflin, Sr.

Leon Hefflin Sr.Leon Hefflin, SrLeon Hefflin Sr
In 1950, Dinah Washington performed at the sixth famed Cavalcade of Jazz concert held at Wrigley Field in Los Angeles which was produced by Leon Hefflin, Sr. on June 25.
The Cavalcade of Jazz concerts were the stepping stone to success for such stars as Toni Harper, Dinah Washington, Roy Milton, Frankie Lane and others.

Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs

US R&BR&BHot R&B/Hip-Hop Singles & Tracks
Both that record and its follow-up, "Salty Papa Blues", made the Billboard "Harlem Hit Parade" in 1944.

Amy Winehouse

WinehouseBlake Fielder-CivilMitch Winehouse
Tony Bennett said of Washington during a recording session with Amy Winehouse: "She was a good friend of mine, you know. She was great. She used to just come in with two suitcases in Vegas without being booked. And she'd just come in and put the suitcases down. And she'd say "I'm here, boss". And she'd stay as long as she wanted. And all the kids in all the shows on the Strip would come that night. They'd hear that she's in town and it would be packed just for her performance".
In July 2000, she became the featured female vocalist with the National Youth Jazz Orchestra; her influences were to include Sarah Vaughan and Dinah Washington, the latter of whom she was already listening to at home.

A Rockin' Good Way (to Mess Around and Fall in Love)

A Rockin' Good Way
1 R&B) and "A Rockin' Good Way (To Mess Around and Fall in Love)" (No.
In 1960, the song was recorded as a pop and R&B duet by Dinah Washington and Brook Benton.

Pee Wee Crayton

PeeWee Crayton
Also featured on the same day were Lionel Hampton, PeeWee Crayton's Orchestra, Roy Milton and his Orchestra, Tiny Davis and Her Hell Divers, and other artists.
Also featured on the same day were Lionel Hampton, Roy Milton's Orchestra, Dinah Washington, Tiny Davis and Her Hell Divers, and other artists.

Chuck Higgins

Chuck Higgin's OrchestraChuck HigginCharles W. Higgins
Also performing that day were Little Richard, The Mel Williams Dots, Julie Stevens, Chuck Higgin's Orchestra, Bo Rhambo, Willie Hayden & Five Black Birds, The Premiers, Gerald Wilson and His 20-Pc.
Also performing that day were Dinah Washington, The Mel Williams Dots, Julie Stevens, Little Richard, Bo Rhambo, Willie Hayden & Five Black Birds, The Premiers, Gerald Wilson and His 20-Pc.