A report on Former Qin and Dingling

Former Qin 376 CE
Lineage of the Dingling
Former Qin 376 CE

One fragment, at present-day Taiyuan, Shanxi was soon overwhelmed in 386 by the Xianbei under the Later Yan and the Dingling.

- Former Qin

During the Sixteen Kingdoms period, the West Dingling Khan Zhai Bin (翟斌) lead his hordes, migrate from Kazakhstan into Central China, served under the Former Qin, after series of plotting, Zhai Bin was betrayed by Former Qin, to avoid Qin nobles further attempts, he revolted against the Former Qin Dynasty.

- Dingling
Former Qin 376 CE

2 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Painting depicting a Xianbei Murong archer in a tomb of the Former Yan (337–370).

Xianbei

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Today Mongolia, Inner Mongolia, and Northeastern China.

Today Mongolia, Inner Mongolia, and Northeastern China.

Painting depicting a Xianbei Murong archer in a tomb of the Former Yan (337–370).
The Xianbei state (1st–3rd century).
Figure of a Xianbei warrior from the Northern Dynasties (286–581 AD) era. The figure wear a covered "wind hat", trousers, short upper tunic and a cape tied around the neck, designed to protect against the wind and dust.
Xianbei musician, tomb of Sima Jinlong, 484 CE.
Northern dynasties horseman
Northern Wei cavalry
Northern Wei cavalry
Xianbei belt buckles, 3–4th century AD
Xianbei head ornament with horse motif
Northern Wei earrings
Painting of the Tuoba-Xianbei Northern Zhou general Li Xian (504-569 CE).
Female Xianbei figure

The Xianbei were at one point all defeated and conquered by the Di-led Former Qin dynasty before it fell apart not long after its defeat in the Battle of Fei River by the Eastern Jin.

In 85, the Xianbei secured an alliance with the Dingling and Southern Xiongnu.

Territory of the Former Qin kingdom and the Jin dynasty in 376.

Sixteen Kingdoms

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Chaotic period in Chinese history from AD 304 to 439 when the political order of northern China fractured into a series of short-lived dynastic states.

Chaotic period in Chinese history from AD 304 to 439 when the political order of northern China fractured into a series of short-lived dynastic states.

Territory of the Former Qin kingdom and the Jin dynasty in 376.
Ruins of Tongwancheng, the capital of the Xia kingdom built in the early 5th century by Xiongnu chieftain Helian Bobo in modern-day Jingbian, in northern Shaanxi province, near the border with Inner Mongolia. Tongwancheng was captured by the Xianbei-led Northern Wei in 427.
A mural painting showing a leisurely life scene 384-441 A.D., from the Dingjiazha Tomb No. 5 in Chiu-ch'üan, Later Liang – Northern Liang.
The White Horse Pagoda, Dunhuang, commemorating Kumarajiva's white horse which carried the scriptures to China, c. 384.
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The term "Sixteen Kingdoms" was first used by the 6th-century historian Cui Hong in the Spring and Autumn Annals of the Sixteen Kingdoms and refers to the five Liangs (Former, Later, Northern, Southern and Western), four Yans (Former, Later, Northern, and Southern), three Qins (Former, Later and Western), two Zhaos (Former and Later), Cheng Han and Xia.

In 388, Zhai Liao, an ethnic Dingling leader in Henan founded the Zhai Wei, which was wedged between the Later Yan, Western Yan and Eastern Jin.