Dionne Warwick in Valley of the Dolls

Dionne Warwick in Valley of the Dolls is the title of Dionne Warwick's tenth album for the Scepter label.wikipedia
40 Related Articles

Dionne Warwick

DionneDionne WarrickDionne Warwicke
Dionne Warwick in Valley of the Dolls is the title of Dionne Warwick's tenth album for the Scepter label.
Warwick later covered two of Cilla's songs - "You're My World" appeared on Dionne Warwick in Valley of the Dolls, released in 1968 and on the soundtrack to Alfie.

(Theme from) Valley of the Dolls

Valley of the Dollstheme from the movie ''Valley of the DollsTheme from Valley of the Dolls
The album's lead single was the title track, "(Theme from) Valley of the Dolls", from the film of the same name.
The RIAA-certified Gold Scepter LP that contained the hit version of the song, Dionne Warwick in Valley of the Dolls, peaked at number six on the Billboard Top 10 Albums chart, and would remain on the chart for over a year.

Do You Know the Way to San Jose

Do You Know the Way to San Jose?Do You Know the Way to San JoséDo You Know the Way to San José?
The LP would then yield Warwick's next big hit and first Grammy Award winner, "Do You Know the Way to San Jose".
The song was released on the 1968 RIAA Certified Gold album Dionne Warwick in Valley of the Dolls.

Up, Up and Away (song)

Up, Up and AwayUp, Up, and AwayUp Up and Away
Other notable songs on the LP were "Silent Voices" (which under its original Italian title, "La Voce Del Silenzio", had been Warwick's entry into the 1968 San Remo Song Festival), "Walking Backwards Down the Road", "Up, Up, and Away", and "You're My World" — another Italian song (written by Umberto Bindi, famous Genoa's songwriter) the latter having been a British hit for Cilla Black, and "Let Me Be Lonely", the B side of the single "Do You Know the Way to San Jose", which charted on Billboard Hot 100 Singles Chart, becoming one of several double sided hits for Warwick during the 1960s.

Scepter Records

ScepterScepter StudiosCitation
Dionne Warwick in Valley of the Dolls is the title of Dionne Warwick's tenth album for the Scepter label.

Artists and repertoire

A&RA & Rtalent scout
It was recorded at A&R and Bell Sound Studios in New York City and was produced by Burt Bacharach and Hal David.

New York City

New YorkNew York, New YorkNew York City, New York
It was recorded at A&R and Bell Sound Studios in New York City and was produced by Burt Bacharach and Hal David.

Burt Bacharach

BacharachBacharachianAn Evening with Burt Bacharach
It was recorded at A&R and Bell Sound Studios in New York City and was produced by Burt Bacharach and Hal David.

Hal David

DavidH. David
It was recorded at A&R and Bell Sound Studios in New York City and was produced by Burt Bacharach and Hal David.

André Previn

Andre PrevinPrevinAndré
The song was written by André Previn and Dory Previn, and had initially been intended for Judy Garland before she was fired from the film.

Dory Previn

Dory LangdonDory Langdon PrevinDory Langan
The song was written by André Previn and Dory Previn, and had initially been intended for Judy Garland before she was fired from the film.

Judy Garland

GarlandDorothyEthel Gumm
The song was written by André Previn and Dory Previn, and had initially been intended for Judy Garland before she was fired from the film.

Barbara Parkins

At the urging of one of the film's stars, Barbara Parkins, the song was given to Warwick.

John Williams

Johnny WilliamsJohn T. WilliamsWilliams
Warwick's Scepter version of the song, however, differed from the John Williams version included in the film.

20th Century Fox Records

20th Century20th Century Records20th Century Fox
This was because Warwick was signed to Scepter, and the soundtrack was released on 20th Century Records.

Billboard Hot 100

Billboard'' Hot 100Hot 100US
The Dionne Warwick single peaked at #2 on the Billboard Hot 100 for four weeks in February 1968, at #2 on the Cash Box and #1 on the Record World charts during the spring of 1968. The song, (which Warwick didn't initially like, according to Robin Platts in the book, Burt Bacharach & Hal David ) would peak at #10 on the Billboard Hot 100 and become one of Warwick's signature songs.

Cashbox (magazine)

Cash BoxCashboxCash Box'' Top 100
The Dionne Warwick single peaked at #2 on the Billboard Hot 100 for four weeks in February 1968, at #2 on the Cash Box and #1 on the Record World charts during the spring of 1968.

Grammy Award

GrammyGrammy AwardsGrammys
The LP would then yield Warwick's next big hit and first Grammy Award winner, "Do You Know the Way to San Jose".

Robin Platts

The song, (which Warwick didn't initially like, according to Robin Platts in the book, Burt Bacharach & Hal David ) would peak at #10 on the Billboard Hot 100 and become one of Warwick's signature songs.

Billboard (magazine)

BillboardBillboard MagazineBillboard'' magazine
The song, (which Warwick didn't initially like, according to Robin Platts in the book, Burt Bacharach & Hal David ) would peak at #10 on the Billboard Hot 100 and become one of Warwick's signature songs.

You're My World

You're My World (Il Mio Mondo)
Other notable songs on the LP were "Silent Voices" (which under its original Italian title, "La Voce Del Silenzio", had been Warwick's entry into the 1968 San Remo Song Festival), "Walking Backwards Down the Road", "Up, Up, and Away", and "You're My World" — another Italian song (written by Umberto Bindi, famous Genoa's songwriter) the latter having been a British hit for Cilla Black, and "Let Me Be Lonely", the B side of the single "Do You Know the Way to San Jose", which charted on Billboard Hot 100 Singles Chart, becoming one of several double sided hits for Warwick during the 1960s.

Umberto Bindi

Other notable songs on the LP were "Silent Voices" (which under its original Italian title, "La Voce Del Silenzio", had been Warwick's entry into the 1968 San Remo Song Festival), "Walking Backwards Down the Road", "Up, Up, and Away", and "You're My World" — another Italian song (written by Umberto Bindi, famous Genoa's songwriter) the latter having been a British hit for Cilla Black, and "Let Me Be Lonely", the B side of the single "Do You Know the Way to San Jose", which charted on Billboard Hot 100 Singles Chart, becoming one of several double sided hits for Warwick during the 1960s.

Cilla Black

CillaPriscilla WhiteCilla the Musical
Other notable songs on the LP were "Silent Voices" (which under its original Italian title, "La Voce Del Silenzio", had been Warwick's entry into the 1968 San Remo Song Festival), "Walking Backwards Down the Road", "Up, Up, and Away", and "You're My World" — another Italian song (written by Umberto Bindi, famous Genoa's songwriter) the latter having been a British hit for Cilla Black, and "Let Me Be Lonely", the B side of the single "Do You Know the Way to San Jose", which charted on Billboard Hot 100 Singles Chart, becoming one of several double sided hits for Warwick during the 1960s.