Diplomatic recognition

recognizedrecognitioninternational recognitionrecognisedunrecognizedrecognizeunrecognisedstate recognitioninternationally recognizedrecognizes
Diplomatic recognition in international law is a unilateral political act with domestic and international legal consequences whereby a state acknowledges an act or status of another state or government in control of a state (may be also a recognized state).wikipedia
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Rhodesia

RhodesianSouthern RhodesiaRepublic of Rhodesia
Some consider that a state has a responsibility not to recognize as a state any entity that has attained the qualifications for statehood by a violation of basic principles of the UN Charter: the UN Security Council has in several instances (Resolution 216 (1965) and Resolution 217 (1965), concerning Rhodesia; Resolution 541 (1983), concerning Northern Cyprus; and Resolution 787 (1992), concerning the Republika Srpska) issued Chapter VII resolutions (binding in international law) that denied their statehood and precluded recognition. The doctrine of non-recognition of illegal or immoral situations, like territorial gains achieved by force, is called the Stimson Doctrine, and has become more important since the Second World War, especially in the United Nations where it is a method of ensuring compliance with international law – for instance, in the case of Rhodesia in 1965.
(The government of the United Kingdom supported Rhodesia's transition to a multi-racial democracy.) The UDI administration initially sought recognition as an autonomous realm within the Commonwealth of Nations, but reconstituted itself as a republic in 1970.

Taiwan

🇹🇼FormosaRepublic of China
Also, the Republic of China, commonly known as "Taiwan", is generally recognized as de facto independent and sovereign, but is not universally recognized as de jure independent due to the complex political status of Taiwan related to the United Nation's withdrawal of recognition in favor of the People's Republic of China in 1971.
Under its One-China policy the PRC refuses diplomatic relations with any country that recognizes the ROC.

Taliban

the TalibanTaliban factionsTaleban
For instance, the Taliban government of the Islamic State of Afghanistan, which lasted from 1996 to 2001, was recognized by only Pakistan, the United Arab Emirates, and Saudi Arabia, while far more had recognized the government of ousted President Burhanuddin Rabbani.
At its peak, formal diplomatic recognition of the Taliban's government was acknowledged by only three nations: Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates.

International Court of Justice advisory opinion on Kosovo's declaration of independence

advisory opinionInruled thatInternational Court of Justice's advisory opinion
In the 2010 [[International Court of Justice advisory opinion on Kosovo's declaration of independence]], the ICJ ruled that "general international law contains no applicable prohibition of declarations of independence."
The United Nations have never recognised any case of a unilateral independence declaration.

Soviet Union

SovietUSSRSoviets
Another example is the state of Israel in 1948, whose government was immediately recognized de facto by the United States and three days later by Soviet de jure recognition.
Once denied diplomatic recognition by the Western world, the Soviet Union had official relations with practically every nation by the late 1940s.

Stimson Doctrine

which never formally recognized the Soviet occupationconsidered illegal and never officially recognizedconsidered
The doctrine of non-recognition of illegal or immoral situations, like territorial gains achieved by force, is called the Stimson Doctrine, and has become more important since the Second World War, especially in the United Nations where it is a method of ensuring compliance with international law – for instance, in the case of Rhodesia in 1965.
The policy was implemented by the United States federal government, enunciated in a note of January 7, 1932, to the Empire of Japan and the Republic of China, of non-recognition of international territorial changes that were executed by force.

Somaliland

RegionDistrictRepublic of Somaliland
Unrecognized countries may have either full control over their occupied territory (such as Somaliland), or only partial control (such as Western Sahara).
established_event8 = Unrecognised

Confederate States of America

ConfederateConfederacyConfederates
The UK issued a proclamation of neutrality soon after the outbreak of the American Civil War, which "tacitly granted the Confederacy belligerent status, the right to contract loans and purchase supplies in neutral nations and to exercise belligerent rights on the high seas." Another right of significance accorded to belligerents that was seen as potentially significant at the time was the right to issue letters of marque. The UK's extension of belligerent recognition to the Confederacy, greatly angered and concerned the United States, which strenuously and successfully worked to prevent full diplomatic recognition.
They were unofficially interviewed, but neither secured official recognition for the Confederacy.

List of states with limited recognition

states with limited recognitionunrecognisedunrecognized state
List of states with limited recognition
A number of polities have declared independence and sought diplomatic recognition from the international community as de jure sovereign states, but have not been universally recognised as such.

Sovereign state

statestatessovereign states
Diplomatic recognition in international law is a unilateral political act with domestic and international legal consequences whereby a state acknowledges an act or status of another state or government in control of a state (may be also a recognized state).
While according to the declarative theory of statehood, a sovereign state can exist without being recognised by other sovereign states, unrecognised states will often find it hard to exercise full treaty-making powers and engage in diplomatic relations with other sovereign states.

Micronation

micronationsmicro-nationmicro-nations
Micronation
A micronation, sometimes referred to as a model country or new country project, is an entity that claims to be an independent nation or state but is not recognized by world governments or major international organizations.

International law

public international lawinternationallaw of nations
The doctrine of non-recognition of illegal or immoral situations, like territorial gains achieved by force, is called the Stimson Doctrine, and has become more important since the Second World War, especially in the United Nations where it is a method of ensuring compliance with international law – for instance, in the case of Rhodesia in 1965. Diplomatic recognition in international law is a unilateral political act with domestic and international legal consequences whereby a state acknowledges an act or status of another state or government in control of a state (may be also a recognized state).
Diplomatic law and Diplomatic recognition

Diplomacy

diplomatic relationsdiplomatdiplomatic
Withdrawal of recognition of a government is a more severe act of disapproval than the breaking of diplomatic relations.
Diplomatic recognition is an important factor in determining whether a nation is an independent state.

De facto

de-factode facto relationshipdefacto
Recognition can be reaccorded either de facto or de jure.

De jure

de iurede jure standardformally
Recognition can be reaccorded either de facto or de jure.

United Nations

UN🇺🇳U.N.
The doctrine of non-recognition of illegal or immoral situations, like territorial gains achieved by force, is called the Stimson Doctrine, and has become more important since the Second World War, especially in the United Nations where it is a method of ensuring compliance with international law – for instance, in the case of Rhodesia in 1965. A state is not required to accord formal bilateral recognition to any other state, and some have a general policy of not doing so, considering that a vote for its membership of an international organisation restricted to states, such as the United Nations, is proof of recognition.

Charter of the United Nations

UN CharterCharterAdmitted to the
Some consider that a state has a responsibility not to recognize as a state any entity that has attained the qualifications for statehood by a violation of basic principles of the UN Charter: the UN Security Council has in several instances (Resolution 216 (1965) and Resolution 217 (1965), concerning Rhodesia; Resolution 541 (1983), concerning Northern Cyprus; and Resolution 787 (1992), concerning the Republika Srpska) issued Chapter VII resolutions (binding in international law) that denied their statehood and precluded recognition.

United Nations Security Council

Security CouncilUN Security CouncilU.N. Security Council
Some consider that a state has a responsibility not to recognize as a state any entity that has attained the qualifications for statehood by a violation of basic principles of the UN Charter: the UN Security Council has in several instances (Resolution 216 (1965) and Resolution 217 (1965), concerning Rhodesia; Resolution 541 (1983), concerning Northern Cyprus; and Resolution 787 (1992), concerning the Republika Srpska) issued Chapter VII resolutions (binding in international law) that denied their statehood and precluded recognition.

Northern Cyprus

Turkish Republic of Northern CyprusTurkish Cypriotnorth
Some consider that a state has a responsibility not to recognize as a state any entity that has attained the qualifications for statehood by a violation of basic principles of the UN Charter: the UN Security Council has in several instances (Resolution 216 (1965) and Resolution 217 (1965), concerning Rhodesia; Resolution 541 (1983), concerning Northern Cyprus; and Resolution 787 (1992), concerning the Republika Srpska) issued Chapter VII resolutions (binding in international law) that denied their statehood and precluded recognition.

Republika Srpska

Bosnian SerbRepublic of SrpskaSerb Republic
Some consider that a state has a responsibility not to recognize as a state any entity that has attained the qualifications for statehood by a violation of basic principles of the UN Charter: the UN Security Council has in several instances (Resolution 216 (1965) and Resolution 217 (1965), concerning Rhodesia; Resolution 541 (1983), concerning Northern Cyprus; and Resolution 787 (1992), concerning the Republika Srpska) issued Chapter VII resolutions (binding in international law) that denied their statehood and precluded recognition.

International Court of Justice

ICJWorld CourtInternational Court of Justice (ICJ)
In the 2010 [[International Court of Justice advisory opinion on Kosovo's declaration of independence]], the ICJ ruled that "general international law contains no applicable prohibition of declarations of independence."

United Kingdom

British🇬🇧UK
An example of the difference is when the United Kingdom recognized the Soviet state de facto in 1921, but de jure only in 1924.

History of Soviet Russia and the Soviet Union (1917–27)

formation of the Soviet Union1917–27creation of the USSR
An example of the difference is when the United Kingdom recognized the Soviet state de facto in 1921, but de jure only in 1924.

Israel

🇮🇱IsraeliState of Israel
Another example is the state of Israel in 1948, whose government was immediately recognized de facto by the United States and three days later by Soviet de jure recognition.

United States

American🇺🇸U.S.
Another example is the state of Israel in 1948, whose government was immediately recognized de facto by the United States and three days later by Soviet de jure recognition.