Disco

disco musicdisco eraanti-disco backlashdisco dancingdisco-popClub/Danceproto-discodisco backlashdisco dancedisco funk
Disco is a music genre and subculture that emerged in the 1970s from the United States' urban nightlife scene.wikipedia
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Donna Summer

Diva DonnaDisco DonnaDonna Gaines
Well-known disco artists include Donna Summer, the Bee Gees, Gloria Gaynor, KC and the Sunshine Band, the Village People, The Trammps, the Jackson 5 and Chic.
She gained prominence during the disco era of the late 1970s.

Bee Gees

The Bee GeesBarry, Robin and Maurice GibbBee Gee
Well-known disco artists include Donna Summer, the Bee Gees, Gloria Gaynor, KC and the Sunshine Band, the Village People, The Trammps, the Jackson 5 and Chic.
The trio were especially successful as a popular music act in the late 1960s and early 1970s, and later as prominent performers of the disco music era in the mid-to-late 1970s.

Village People

The Village PeopleSmall Town BinomesVillage Person
Well-known disco artists include Donna Summer, the Bee Gees, Gloria Gaynor, KC and the Sunshine Band, the Village People, The Trammps, the Jackson 5 and Chic.
Village People is an American disco group best known for their on-stage costumes, catchy tunes, and suggestive lyrics.

KC and the Sunshine Band

KC & the Sunshine BandK.C. & The Sunshine BandK.C. and the Sunshine Band
Well-known disco artists include Donna Summer, the Bee Gees, Gloria Gaynor, KC and the Sunshine Band, the Village People, The Trammps, the Jackson 5 and Chic.
KC and the Sunshine Band is an American disco and funk band, founded in 1973 in Hialeah, Florida.

Thank God It's Friday (film)

Thank God It's Fridayfilmfilm of the same name
Films such as Saturday Night Fever (1977) and Thank God It's Friday (1978) contributed to disco's mainstream popularity.
Produced at the height of the disco craze, the film features The Commodores performing "Too Hot ta Trot", and Donna Summer performing "Last Dance", which won the Academy Award for Best Original Song in 1978.

Chic (band)

ChicNile Rodgers & ChicChic Featuring Nile Rodgers
Well-known disco artists include Donna Summer, the Bee Gees, Gloria Gaynor, KC and the Sunshine Band, the Village People, The Trammps, the Jackson 5 and Chic.
It recorded many commercially successful disco songs, including "Dance, Dance, Dance (Yowsah, Yowsah, Yowsah)" (1977), "Everybody Dance" (1977), "Le Freak" (1978), "I Want Your Love" (1978), "Good Times" (1979), and "My Forbidden Lover" (1979).

Gloria Gaynor

Gaynor
Well-known disco artists include Donna Summer, the Bee Gees, Gloria Gaynor, KC and the Sunshine Band, the Village People, The Trammps, the Jackson 5 and Chic.
Gloria Gaynor (born September 7, 1949) is an American singer, best known for the disco era hits "I Will Survive" (Hot 100 number 1, 1979), "Never Can Say Goodbye" (Hot 100 number 9, 1974), "Let Me Know (I Have a Right)" (Hot 100 number 42, 1980) and "I Am What I Am" (R&B number 82, 1983).

The Trammps

Jimmy Ellis
Well-known disco artists include Donna Summer, the Bee Gees, Gloria Gaynor, KC and the Sunshine Band, the Village People, The Trammps, the Jackson 5 and Chic.
The Trammps were an American disco and soul band, who were based in Philadelphia and were one of the first disco bands.

Synthesizer

synthesizerssynthsynths
The disco sound is typified by "four-on-the-floor" beats, syncopated basslines, and string sections, horns, electric piano, synthesizers, and electric rhythm guitars.
In the late 1970s, synths were used in progressive rock, pop and disco.

Studio 54

(Studio) 54CBS-TV Studio 52disco scene
By the late 1970s, most major U.S. cities had thriving disco club scenes, and DJs would mix dance records at clubs such as Studio 54 in New York City, a venue popular among celebrities.
In the late 1970s, at the peak of the disco dancing and music trend, the building was renamed after its location and became a world-famous nightclub and discotheque.

House music

househouse-musicprogressive house
Disco was a key influence in the development of electronic dance music and house music. The genre was also shaped by Tom Moulton, who wanted to extend the enjoyment of dance songs—thus creating the extended mix or "remix", going from a three-minute 45 rpm single to the much longer 12" record. Other influential DJs and remixers who helped to establish what became known as the "disco sound" included David Mancuso, Nicky Siano, Shep Pettibone, Larry Levan, Walter Gibbons, and Chicago-based Frankie Knuckles. Frankie Knuckles was not only an important disco DJ; he also helped to develop house music in the 1980s, a contribution which earned him the honorific title of "Godfather of House".
While house displayed several characteristics similar to disco music, which preceded and influenced it, as both were DJ and record producer-created dance music, house was more electronic and minimalistic.

Disco Demolition Night

The disco backlashanti-disco backlashbacklash
Disco Demolition Night, an anti-disco protest held in Chicago on July 12, 1979, remains the most well-known of several "backlash" incidents across the country that symbolized disco's declining fortune.
At the climax of the event, a crate filled with disco records was blown up on the field between games of the twi-night doubleheader between the Chicago White Sox and the Detroit Tigers.

Electronic dance music

EDMdanceelectronic dance
Disco was a key influence in the development of electronic dance music and house music.
In the late 1960s bands such as Silver Apples created electronic music that was intended to be danced to. Other early examples of music that influenced later electronic dance music include Jamaican dub music in the 1970s, the synthesizer-based disco music of Italian producer Giorgio Moroder in the late 1970s, and the electro-pop of Kraftwerk and Yellow Magic Orchestra in the mid to late 1970s.

Saturday Night Fever

1977 film1977 hit film1977 movie
Films such as Saturday Night Fever (1977) and Thank God It's Friday (1978) contributed to disco's mainstream popularity.
A huge commercial success, the film significantly helped to popularize disco music around the world and made Travolta, already well known from his role on TV's Welcome Back, Kotter, a household name.

Philadelphia soul

Philly soulPhiladelphia SoundPhilly disco
Psychedelic soul groups like the Chambers Brothers and especially Sly and the Family Stone influenced proto-disco acts such as Isaac Hayes, Willie Hutch and the soul style known as the Philadelphia Sound.
The genre laid the groundwork for disco by fusing the R&B rhythm sections of the 1960s with the pop vocal tradition, and featuring a slightly more pronounced jazz influence in its melodic structures and arrangements.

Shep Pettibone

ShepS. Pettibone
The genre was also shaped by Tom Moulton, who wanted to extend the enjoyment of dance songs—thus creating the extended mix or "remix", going from a three-minute 45 rpm single to the much longer 12" record. Other influential DJs and remixers who helped to establish what became known as the "disco sound" included David Mancuso, Nicky Siano, Shep Pettibone, Larry Levan, Walter Gibbons, and Chicago-based Frankie Knuckles. Frankie Knuckles was not only an important disco DJ; he also helped to develop house music in the 1980s, a contribution which earned him the honorific title of "Godfather of House".
His earliest work known to the public was for one of New York City's top urban radio station, WRKS 98.7 Kiss-FM, and later as remixer/producer for the disco/dance label Salsoul Records.

Soul Makossa

Soul Makossa (Money)
Early songs with disco elements include "You Keep Me Hangin' On" by the Supremes, (1966), "Soul Makossa" by Manu Dibango, (1972), "Superstition" by Stevie Wonder (1972), "Keep on Truckin'" by Eddie Kendricks (1973) and "The Love I Lost" by Harold Melvin & the Blue Notes (1973).
It is often cited as one of the first disco records.

Psychedelic soul

black rockpsychedelicfuzz-soul
Psychedelic soul groups like the Chambers Brothers and especially Sly and the Family Stone influenced proto-disco acts such as Isaac Hayes, Willie Hutch and the soul style known as the Philadelphia Sound.
It came to prominence in the late 1960s and continued into the 1970s, playing a major role in the development of funk and disco.

Vince Aletti

The first article about disco was written in 1973 by Vince Aletti for Rolling Stone magazine.
He was the first person to write about disco in an article published by the magazine in 1973.

Salsoul Records

SalsoulSalsoul labelVMG Salsoul
Early disco was dominated by record producers and labels such as Salsoul Records (Ken, Stanley, and Joseph Cayre), West End Records (Mel Cheren), Casablanca (Neil Bogart), and Prelude (Marvin Schlachter), to name a few.
Salsoul issued about 300 singles, including many disco/post-disco 12-inch releases, and a string of albums in the 1970s and early 1980s.

Barry White

Love Unlimited OrchestraB. WhiteBarry Wight
In 1974, "Love's Theme" by Barry White's the Love Unlimited Orchestra became the second disco song to reach number one on the Billboard Hot 100, after "Love Train".
A three-time Grammy Award–winner known for his distinctive bass-baritone voice and romantic image, his greatest success came in the 1970s as a solo singer and with The Love Unlimited Orchestra, crafting many enduring soul, funk, and disco songs such as his two biggest hits: "You're the First, the Last, My Everything" and "Can't Get Enough of Your Love, Babe".

Walter Gibbons

The genre was also shaped by Tom Moulton, who wanted to extend the enjoyment of dance songs—thus creating the extended mix or "remix", going from a three-minute 45 rpm single to the much longer 12" record. Other influential DJs and remixers who helped to establish what became known as the "disco sound" included David Mancuso, Nicky Siano, Shep Pettibone, Larry Levan, Walter Gibbons, and Chicago-based Frankie Knuckles. Frankie Knuckles was not only an important disco DJ; he also helped to develop house music in the 1980s, a contribution which earned him the honorific title of "Godfather of House".
Walter Gibbons (April 2, 1954 – September 23, 1994) was an American record producer, early disco DJ, and remixer.

Confessions on a Dance Floor

I Love New York2005 ''Confessions on a Dance Floor'' albumConfessions on a Dance Floor'' album
It has had several revivals, such as Madonna's highly successful 2005 album Confessions on a Dance Floor, and again in the 2010s, entering the pop charts in the US and the UK.
Madonna collaborated with Patrick Leonard, Ahmadzaï and Price to write new songs, the latter being assigned to pen disco songs sounding like "ABBA on drugs".

Modern soul

Donn Thomas
The shift by some DJs to the newer sounds coming from the U.S.A. resulted in a split in the scene, whereby some abandoned the 1960s soul and pushed a Modern soul sound which was typically more aligned with Disco than Soul.
Modern soul is a style of music with associated clothing and dance styles (precursors to the disco era), that developed in Northern England in the early 1970s.

Frankie Knuckles

FrankieFrancis NichollsDirectors Cut
The genre was also shaped by Tom Moulton, who wanted to extend the enjoyment of dance songs—thus creating the extended mix or "remix", going from a three-minute 45 rpm single to the much longer 12" record. Other influential DJs and remixers who helped to establish what became known as the "disco sound" included David Mancuso, Nicky Siano, Shep Pettibone, Larry Levan, Walter Gibbons, and Chicago-based Frankie Knuckles. Frankie Knuckles was not only an important disco DJ; he also helped to develop house music in the 1980s, a contribution which earned him the honorific title of "Godfather of House".
Born in The Bronx, Knuckles and his friend Larry Levan began frequenting discos as teenagers during the 1970s.