Dissolution of Czechoslovakia

Velvet Divorcedissolutiondissolvedbreakupbreakup of Czechoslovakiapeacefully dissolvedCzechoslovakiaCzechoslovakia splitIndependencepeaceful dissolution
The Dissolution of Czechoslovakia (Rozdělení Československa, Rozdelenie Česko-Slovenska), which took effect on 1 January 1993, was an event that saw the self-determined split of the federal republic of Czechoslovakia into the independent countries of the Czech Republic and Slovakia.wikipedia
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Czech Republic

CzechCZEthe Czech Republic
The Dissolution of Czechoslovakia (Rozdělení Československa, Rozdelenie Česko-Slovenska), which took effect on 1 January 1993, was an event that saw the self-determined split of the federal republic of Czechoslovakia into the independent countries of the Czech Republic and Slovakia.
On 1 January 1993, Czechoslovakia peacefully dissolved, with its constituent states becoming the independent states of the Czech Republic and Slovakia.

Slovakia

SlovakSVKSlovak Republic
The Dissolution of Czechoslovakia (Rozdělení Československa, Rozdelenie Česko-Slovenska), which took effect on 1 January 1993, was an event that saw the self-determined split of the federal republic of Czechoslovakia into the independent countries of the Czech Republic and Slovakia.
Slovakia became an independent state on 1 January 1993 after the peaceful dissolution of Czechoslovakia, sometimes known as the Velvet Divorce.

Czech and Slovak Federative Republic

CzechoslovakiaCzech and Slovak Federal RepublicCzechoslovak Federative Republic
The Dissolution of Czechoslovakia (Rozdělení Československa, Rozdelenie Česko-Slovenska), which took effect on 1 January 1993, was an event that saw the self-determined split of the federal republic of Czechoslovakia into the independent countries of the Czech Republic and Slovakia.
After the Velvet Revolution in late-1989, Czechoslovakia adopted the official name Czech and Slovak Federative Republic (, Česká a Slovenská Federatívna Republika; ČSFR) during the period from 23 April 1990 until 31 December 1992, when the country was dissolved into the Czech Republic and Slovakia.

Czechoslovakia

CzechoslovakCzechCzechoslovakian
Czechoslovakia was created with the dissolution of Austria-Hungary at the end of World War I. In 1918, a meeting took place in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States, where the future Czechoslovak president Tomáš Garrigue Masaryk and other Czech and Slovak representatives signed the Pittsburgh Agreement, which promised a common state consisting of two equal nations, Slovaks and Czechs.
Czechoslovakia, or Czecho-Slovakia ( Czech and Československo, Česko-Slovensko ), was a sovereign state in Central Europe that existed from October 1918, when it declared its independence from the Austro-Hungarian Empire, until its peaceful dissolution into the Czech Republic and Slovakia on 1 January 1993.

Velvet Revolution

fall of communism1989fall of the communist regime
It is sometimes known as the Velvet Divorce, a reference to the bloodless Velvet Revolution of 1989 that led to the end of the rule of the Communist Party of Czechoslovakia and the restoration of a capitalist state in the country.
On 1 January 1993, Czechoslovakia split into two countries—the Czech Republic and Slovakia.

Václav Klaus

Vaclav KlauspresidentDr Vaclav Klaus
In 1992, the Czech Republic elected Václav Klaus and others who demanded either an even tighter federation ("viable federation") or two independent states.
From July 1992 until the dissolution of Czechoslovakia in January 1993 he served as the second and last Prime Minister of the Czech Republic while it was a federal subject of the Czech and Slovak Federative Republic, and then as the first Prime Minister of the newly-independent Czech Republic from 1993 to 1998.

Václav Havel

Vaclav HavelHavelPresident Havel
Czechoslovak president Václav Havel resigned rather than oversee the dissolution which he had opposed; in a September 1992 opinion poll, only 37% of Slovaks and 36% of Czechs favoured dissolution.
Václav Havel (5 October 1936 – 18 December 2011) was a Czech statesman, writer and former dissident, who served as the last President of Czechoslovakia from 1989 until the dissolution of Czechoslovakia in 1992 and then as the first President of the Czech Republic from 1993 to 2003.

Slovak Socialist Republic

Slovak RepublicSlovakiaSlovak
These entities had arisen before as the Czech Socialist Republic and the Slovak Socialist Republic in 1969 within the framework of a federal republic.
Later, in 1993, the Slovak Republic became an independent state and officially took the name Slovakia as a short form – see dissolution of Czechoslovakia.

Bratislava

PressburgPozsonyBratislava, Slovakia
Six days later, Klaus and Mečiar agreed to dissolve Czechoslovakia at a meeting in Bratislava.
In 1993, the city became the capital of the newly formed Slovak Republic following the Velvet Divorce.

Czech Socialist Republic

Czech RepublicCzech SRČSR
These entities had arisen before as the Czech Socialist Republic and the Slovak Socialist Republic in 1969 within the framework of a federal republic.
Later, in 1992, the Czech Republic became an independent state (see Dissolution of Czechoslovakia).

Nad Tatrou sa blýska

National anthem of SlovakiaSlovak oneSlovakia's national anthem
The same principle was applied to the two-part bilingual Czechoslovak national anthem that comprised two separate pieces of music, the Czech stanza Kde domov můj and the Slovak stanza Nad Tatrou sa blýska.
It was one of Czechoslovakia's dual national anthems and was played in many Slovak towns at noon; this tradition ceased to exist after Czechoslovakia split into two different states in the early 1990s- see The Dissolution of Czechoslovakia.

Citizenship Act (Slovakia)

Slovak citizenshipCitizenship ActSlovak nationality law
Slovak legislation allowed dual citizenship until 2010 when this possibility was abolished (see Citizenship Act (Slovakia)).
The Citizenship Act is a law enacted by the National Council of Slovakia in regard to the nationality law following the dissolution of Czechoslovakia.

Visegrád Group

Visegrad GroupVisegrád FourV4
Under the current European regulations, citizens of either country are entitled to the diplomatic protection of any other EU country and, therefore, the Czech and Slovak Republics have been considering merging their embassies together with nations of the Visegrád Group in order to reduce costs.
After the dissolution of Czechoslovakia in 1993, the Czech Republic and Slovakia became independent members of the group, thus increasing the number of members from three to four.

Slovak National Party

SNSNational PartySlovak National Party'' (SNS)
Some major Slovak parties, however, advocated a looser form of co-existence and the Slovak National Party complete independence and sovereignty.
The alleged party's major concern after the dissolution of Czechoslovakia has been the danger of "irredentism".

Slovak National Council's Declaration of Independence of the Slovak Nation

Declaration of IndependenceDeclaration of Independence of the Slovak NationDeclaration of Independence of the Slovak Republic
On 17 July, the Slovak parliament adopted the declaration of independence of the Slovak nation.
This event was part of a process, which finished with the dissolution of Czechoslovakia and creation of an independent Slovakia on 1 January 1993.

Slovak Republic (1939–1945)

Slovak RepublicSlovakiaSlovak State
Some Slovaks were not in favour of this change, and in March 1939, with pressure from Adolf Hitler, the First Slovak Republic was created as a satellite state of Germany with limited sovereignty.
After the dissolution of Czechoslovakia and the creation of the Slovak republic, the Slovak Liberation Committee proclaimed Tiso's authorization as obsolete.

Moravia

Habsburg MoraviaMoravianMorava
However, after the breakup of Czechoslovakia into Czech Republic and Slovakia in 1993, Moravian area remained integral to the Czech territory, and the latest administrative division of Czech Republic (introduced in 2000) is similar to the administrative division of 1949.

Constitutional Act on the Czechoslovak Federation

Constitutional Law of Federationfederalizationfederalization of Czechoslovakia
In 1968, the Constitutional Law of Federation reinstated an official federal structure (of the 1917 type), but during the "Normalization period" in the 1970s, Gustáv Husák (although a Slovak himself) returned most of the control to Prague.
The constitutional law was superseded by the new Constitution of the Czech Republic and the Constitution of Slovakia that came to force on January 1st, 1993, after the effectively negotiated dissolution of Czechoslovakia.

Czechoslovakia national football team

CzechoslovakiaCzechoslovakia national teamnational team
In their qualifying section for the 1994 FIFA World Cup, the Czechoslovakia national football team competed under the name RCS which stood for "Representation of Czechs and Slovaks".
At the time of the dissolution of Czechoslovakia at the end of 1992, the team was participating in UEFA qualifying Group 4 for the 1994 World Cup; it completed this campaign under the name Representation of Czechs and Slovaks (RCS) before it was disbanded.

Czech Republic national football team

Czech RepublicCzech Republic national teamCzech national team
It was after this that the teams were then officially split up into Czech Republic and Slovakia.
The national team was founded in 1901, existing under the previously mentioned names before the dissolution of Czechoslovakia in 1993.

Telephone numbers in the Czech Republic

+420Czech Republic+42
The two successor states continued to use the country code +42 until February 1997, when this was replaced by two separate codes: +420 for the Czech Republic and +421 for Slovakia.
Following the break-up of Czechoslovakia in 1993, the successor states, the Czech Republic and Slovakia, continued to share the 42 country code until 28 February 1997, with the Czech Republic then adopting 420 and Slovakia adopting 421.

1993 World Junior Ice Hockey Championships

19931993 IIHF World U20 Championship1993 World Junior Championships
The official break-up occurred right in the middle of the 1993 World Junior Ice Hockey Championships, which took place in Sweden.
As the tournament was ongoing, the nation of Czechoslovakia was dissolved into two separate nations, the Czech Republic and Slovakia, on New Years Day, 1993.

Telephone numbers in Slovakia

Telephone prefix+421 31+421
The two successor states continued to use the country code +42 until February 1997, when this was replaced by two separate codes: +420 for the Czech Republic and +421 for Slovakia.
Following the break-up of Czechoslovakia in 1993, the successor states, the Czech Republic and Slovakia, continued to share the 42 country code, until 28 February 1997, when the Czech Republic adopted 420 while Slovakia adopted 421.

Breakup of Yugoslavia

dissolution of Yugoslaviabreak-up of Yugoslaviabreakup
In contrast, other post-communist break-ups (such as the Soviet Union and Yugoslavia) involved violent conflict.

Dissolution of the Soviet Union

fall of the Soviet Unioncollapse of the Soviet Uniondissolution of the USSR
In contrast, other post-communist break-ups (such as the Soviet Union and Yugoslavia) involved violent conflict.