Dissolution of Czechoslovakia

dissolutionVelvet Divorcebreakupdissolvedpeacefully dissolvedsplitbreakup of CzechoslovakiaCzechoslovakiaIndependencepeaceful dissolution
The Dissolution of Czechoslovakia (Rozdělení Československa, Rozdelenie Česko-Slovenska), which took effect on 1 January 1993, was an event that saw the self-determined split of the federal state of Czechoslovakia into the Czech Republic and Slovakia, entities that had arisen before as the Czech Socialist Republic and the Slovak Socialist Republic in 1969 within the framework of a federal republic.wikipedia
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Czechoslovakia

CzechoslovakCzechTCH
The Dissolution of Czechoslovakia (Rozdělení Československa, Rozdelenie Česko-Slovenska), which took effect on 1 January 1993, was an event that saw the self-determined split of the federal state of Czechoslovakia into the Czech Republic and Slovakia, entities that had arisen before as the Czech Socialist Republic and the Slovak Socialist Republic in 1969 within the framework of a federal republic.
Czechoslovakia, or Czecho-Slovakia ( Czech and Československo, Česko-Slovensko ), was a sovereign state in Central Europe that existed from October 1918, when it declared its independence from the Austro-Hungarian Empire, until its peaceful dissolution into the Czech Republic and Slovakia on 1 January 1993.

Czech Republic

🇨🇿CzechCZE
The Dissolution of Czechoslovakia (Rozdělení Československa, Rozdelenie Česko-Slovenska), which took effect on 1 January 1993, was an event that saw the self-determined split of the federal state of Czechoslovakia into the Czech Republic and Slovakia, entities that had arisen before as the Czech Socialist Republic and the Slovak Socialist Republic in 1969 within the framework of a federal republic.
On 1 January 1993, Czechoslovakia peacefully dissolved, with its constituent states becoming the independent states of the Czech Republic and Slovakia.

Slovakia

🇸🇰SlovakSVK
The Dissolution of Czechoslovakia (Rozdělení Československa, Rozdelenie Česko-Slovenska), which took effect on 1 January 1993, was an event that saw the self-determined split of the federal state of Czechoslovakia into the Czech Republic and Slovakia, entities that had arisen before as the Czech Socialist Republic and the Slovak Socialist Republic in 1969 within the framework of a federal republic.
Slovakia became an independent state on 1 January 1993 after the peaceful dissolution of Czechoslovakia, sometimes known as the Velvet Divorce.

Václav Klaus

Vaclav KlauspresidentDr Vaclav Klaus
In 1992, the Czech Republic elected Václav Klaus and others who demanded either an even tighter federation ("viable federation") or two independent states.
He also served as the second and last Prime Minister of the Czech Republic, federal subject of the Czech and Slovak Federative Republic, from July 1992 until the dissolution of Czechoslovakia in January 1993, and as the first Prime Minister of the newly-independent Czech Republic from 1993 to 1998.

Václav Havel

Vaclav HavelHavelPresident Havel
Czechoslovak president Václav Havel resigned rather than oversee the dissolution which he had opposed; in a September 1992 opinion poll, only 37% of Slovaks and 36% of Czechs favoured dissolution.
Václav Havel (5 October 1936 – 18 December 2011) was a Czech statesman, writer and former dissident, who served as the last President of Czechoslovakia from 1989 until the dissolution of Czechoslovakia in 1992 and then as the first President of the Czech Republic from 1993 to 2003.

Slovak Socialist Republic

Slovak RepublicSlovakSlovakia
The Dissolution of Czechoslovakia (Rozdělení Československa, Rozdelenie Česko-Slovenska), which took effect on 1 January 1993, was an event that saw the self-determined split of the federal state of Czechoslovakia into the Czech Republic and Slovakia, entities that had arisen before as the Czech Socialist Republic and the Slovak Socialist Republic in 1969 within the framework of a federal republic.
Later, in 1993, the Slovak Republic became an independent state and officially took the name Slovakia as a short form – see dissolution of Czechoslovakia.

Bratislava

PressburgPozsonyPreßburg
Six days later, Klaus and Mečiar agreed to dissolve Czechoslovakia at a meeting in Bratislava.
In 1993, the city became the capital of the newly formed Slovak Republic following the Velvet Divorce.

Czech Socialist Republic

Czech RepublicČSRCzech SR
The Dissolution of Czechoslovakia (Rozdělení Československa, Rozdelenie Česko-Slovenska), which took effect on 1 January 1993, was an event that saw the self-determined split of the federal state of Czechoslovakia into the Czech Republic and Slovakia, entities that had arisen before as the Czech Socialist Republic and the Slovak Socialist Republic in 1969 within the framework of a federal republic.
Later, in 1992, the Czech Republic became an independent state (see Dissolution of Czechoslovakia).

Velvet Revolution

fall of communismfall of the communist regime1989
It is sometimes known as the Velvet Divorce, a reference to the bloodless Velvet Revolution of 1989 that led to the end of the rule of the Communist Party of Czechoslovakia and the restoration of a capitalist state in the country.
After the dissolution of Czechoslovakia in 1993, Slovakia used the term Gentle Revolution, the term that Slovaks used for the revolution from the beginning.

Citizenship Act (Slovakia)

Slovak citizenshipCitizenship ActSlovak citizen
Slovak legislation allowed dual citizenship until 2010 when this possibility was abolished (see Citizenship Act (Slovakia)).
The Citizenship Act is a law enacted by the National Council of Slovakia in regard to the nationality law following the dissolution of Czechoslovakia.

Visegrád Group

Visegrád FourV4Central Europe
Under the current European regulations, citizens of either country are entitled to the diplomatic protection of any other EU country and, therefore, the Czech and Slovak Republics have been considering merging their embassies together with nations of the Visegrád Group in order to reduce costs.
After the dissolution of Czechoslovakia in 1993, the Czech Republic and Slovakia became independent members of the group, thus increasing the number of members from three to four.

Slovak National Party

SNSNational PartySlovak National Party'' (SNS)
Some major Slovak parties, however, advocated a looser form of co-existence and the Slovak National Party complete independence and sovereignty.
The alleged party's major concern after the dissolution of Czechoslovakia has been the danger of "irredentism".

Slovak National Council's Declaration of Independence of the Slovak Nation

Declaration of Independencedeclaration of independence of the Slovak nationdeclares Slovakia an independent country
On 17 July, the Slovak parliament adopted the declaration of independence of the Slovak nation.
This event was part of a process, which finished with the dissolution of Czechoslovakia and creation of an independent Slovakia on 1 January 1993.

Slovak Republic (1939–1945)

Slovak RepublicSlovakiaFirst Slovak Republic
Some Slovaks were not in favour of this change, and in March 1939, with pressure from Adolf Hitler, the First Slovak Republic was created as a satellite state of Germany with limited sovereignty.
After the dissolution of Czechoslovakia and the creation of the Slovak republic, the Slovak Liberation Committee proclaimed Tiso's authorization as obsolete.

Moravia

MoravaMoravianMähren
U Sabotů or Šance (cs:Šance (Vrbovce)) - historically part of Moravia, awarded to Slovakia in 1997
However, after the breakup of Czechoslovakia into Czech Republic and Slovakia in 1993, Moravian area remained integral to the Czech territory, and the latest administrative division of Czech Republic (introduced in 2000) is similar to the administrative division of 1949.

Constitutional Act on the Czechoslovak Federation

federalizationFederalization of Czechoslovakia1968 constitution
In 1968, the Constitutional Law of Federation reinstated an official federal structure (of the 1917 type), but during the "Normalization period" in the 1970s, Gustáv Husák (although a Slovak himself) returned most of the control to Prague.
The constitutional law was superseded by the new Constitution of the Czech Republic and the Constitution of Slovakia that came to force on January 1st, 1993, after the effectively negotiated dissolution of Czechoslovakia.

Czechoslovakia national football team

CzechoslovakiaCzechoslovakia national teamnational team
In their qualifying section for the 1994 FIFA World Cup, the Czechoslovakia national football team competed under the name RCS which stood for "Representation of Czechs and Slovaks".
At the time of the dissolution of Czechoslovakia at the end of 1992, the team was participating in UEFA qualifying Group 4 for the 1994 World Cup; it completed this campaign under the name Representation of Czechs and Slovaks (RCS) before it was disbanded.

1994 FIFA World Cup

19941994 World CupWorld Cup
In their qualifying section for the 1994 FIFA World Cup, the Czechoslovakia national football team competed under the name RCS which stood for "Representation of Czechs and Slovaks".
The nation of Czechoslovakia dissolved in 1992, and the team completed its qualifying group under the name "Representation of Czechs and Slovaks" (RCS), but failed to qualify for the finals, having been edged out by Romania and Belgium at Group 4.

Telephone numbers in the Czech Republic

+420Czech Republic+42
The two successor states continued to use the country code +42 until 28 February 1997, when this was replaced by two separate codes: +420 for the Czech Republic and +421 for Slovakia.
Following the break-up of Czechoslovakia in 1993, the successor states, the Czech Republic and Slovakia, continued to share the 42 country code until 28 February 1997, with the Czech Republic then adopting 420 and Slovakia adopting 421.

1993 World Junior Ice Hockey Championships

19931993 IIHF World U20 Championship1993 World Junior Championships
The official break-up occurred right in the middle of the 1993 World Junior Ice Hockey Championships, which took place in Sweden.
As the tournament was ongoing, the nation of Czechoslovakia was dissolved into two separate nations, the Czech Republic and Slovakia, on New Years Day, 1993.

Telephone numbers in Slovakia

+421 31+421Telephone area code
The two successor states continued to use the country code +42 until 28 February 1997, when this was replaced by two separate codes: +420 for the Czech Republic and +421 for Slovakia.
Following the break-up of Czechoslovakia in 1993, the successor states, the Czech Republic and Slovakia, continued to share the 42 country code, until 28 February 1997, with the Czech Republic adopted 420 while Slovakia adopted 421.

Gustáv Slamečka

Gustáv Slamečka, a Slovak citizen who was the Czech transport minister (2009 - 2010), used the Slovak language exclusively in his official communication.
The first non-Czech national who became a member of the Czech government after the dissolution of Czechoslovakia was born in Nitra, Slovakia and still possesses the Slovak citizenship as his relatives live in Nitra where he regularly returns to visit them.

Slovak language

SlovakSlovakianSlovak-language
In the former Czechoslovakia, the first television channel was a federal one and the Czech and Slovak languages were used in equal ratios in the TV news there, although foreign films and TV series were almost exclusively dubbed into Czech, for example.
Since the dissolution of Czechoslovakia it has been permitted to use Czech in TV broadcasting and—like any other language of the world—during court proceedings (Administration Procedure Act 99/1963 Zb.).

Czech–Slovak languages

Czech–SlovakCzech-SlovakCzech–Slovak group
For the language comparison see differences between Slovak and Czech languages.
Since the dissolution of Czechoslovakia in 1993, the Czech and Slovak written standards have been the official languages of the Czech and Slovak Republics, respectively.

Dissolution of the Soviet Union

fall of the Soviet Unioncollapse of the Soviet Uniondissolution of the USSR
This can be contrasted to the dissolution of the Soviet Union, where the Russian Federation was recognized as successor state to not only the RSFSR but the USSR itself.
Dissolution of Czechoslovakia