District of Columbia home rule

home ruleCommissioners of the District of ColumbiaD.C. Home ruleDC Home RuleDistrict of Columbia City Councilexclusive controlhome rule for the Districthome rule in the District of Columbiahome-ruleself-determination
District of Columbia home rule is District of Columbia residents' ability to govern their local affairs.wikipedia
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Washington, D.C.

Washington, DCWashington D.C.District of Columbia
District of Columbia home rule is District of Columbia residents' ability to govern their local affairs.
The U.S. Constitution provided for a federal district under the exclusive jurisdiction of the U.S. Congress, and the District is therefore not a part of any U.S. state.

District of Columbia voting rights

full representation in Congressvoting representationDistrict of Columbia House Voting Rights Act of 2009
A separate yet related controversy is the District's lack of voting representation in Congress.
The Constitution grants Congress exclusive jurisdiction over the District in "all cases whatsoever".

Walter Washington

Walter E. WashingtonMayor Walter WashingtonWalter E Washington
Walter E. Washington was appointed the first mayor, and Thomas W. Fletcher was appointed the first deputy mayor.
He was chief executive of Washington, D.C. from 1967 to 1979, serving as the first and only Mayor-Commissioner from 1967 to 1974 and as the first home-rule mayor of the District of Columbia from 1975 to 1979.

Federalist No. 43

43Federalist'' No. 43
James Madison explained the need for a federal district on January 23, 1788, in the Federalist No. 43, arguing that the national capital needed to be distinct from the states, in order to provide for its own maintenance and safety.
This assertion is often cited in the efforts for DC Home Rule and DC Statehood.

Council of the District of Columbia

D.C. CouncilD.C. City CouncilCouncil
On December 24, 1973, Congress enacted the District of Columbia Home Rule Act, providing for an elected mayor and the 13-member Council of the District of Columbia.
Since 1973, the United States Congress has devolved certain powers to the council that would typically be exercised by state legislatures, as well as many powers normally exercised by a city council in the rest of the country.

John Nevius

John A. Nevius
The first Council appointments were Chairman John W. Hechinger, Vice Chairman Walter E. Fauntroy, Stanley J. Anderson, Margaret A. Haywood, John A. Nevius, William S. Thompson, J.C. Turner, Polly Shackleton, and Joseph P. Yeldell.
John A. (Jack) Nevius (July 15, 1920 – April 23, 1993) was a lawyer and politician who served as the last head of Washington, DC's pre-Home Rule city council.

District of Columbia Home Rule Act

Home Rule ActHome RuleD.C. Home Rule Act
On December 24, 1973, Congress enacted the District of Columbia Home Rule Act, providing for an elected mayor and the 13-member Council of the District of Columbia.
The District of Columbia Home Rule Act is a United States federal law passed on December 24, 1973 which devolved certain congressional powers of the District of Columbia to local government, furthering District of Columbia home rule.

Mayor of the District of Columbia

MayorMayor of Washington, D.C.D.C. Mayor
On December 24, 1973, Congress enacted the District of Columbia Home Rule Act, providing for an elected mayor and the 13-member Council of the District of Columbia.
Incumbent mayor-commissioner Walter Washington was elected the first home-rule Mayor of the District of Columbia on November 5, 1974.

United States Attorney for the District of Columbia

U.S. Attorney for the District of ColumbiaDistrict of ColumbiaUnited States Attorney's Office for the District of Columbia
The United States Attorney for the District of Columbia is also appointed by the President and is responsible for prosecuting both federal and local felony crimes, such as robbery, murder, aggravated assault, grand theft, and arson.
Unlike the states, District of Columbia is under the exclusive jurisdiction of the U.S. Congress.

Residence Act

Residence Act of 1790Residence BillAn Act for establishing the temporary and permanent seat of the Government of the United States
On July 16, 1790, the Residence Act provided for a new permanent capital to be located on the Potomac River, the exact area to be selected by President Washington.

District of Columbia retrocession

retrocededreturnedreturned to Virginia
As an early example from the mid-19th century, when Jacksonian Democrats tried to exercise greater authority over the District, the population convened to request retrocession of the District back to the states of Maryland and Virginia.
Twenty-first-century proposals to return the remaining portion of the District of Columbia to the state of Maryland are cited as one way to provide full voting representation in Congress and return local control of the District to its residents.

David Carliner

In 1967, President Lyndon Johnson presented to Congress a plan to reorganize the District's government designed by David Carliner.
Most importantly, he was the chair of the District of Columbia Home Rule Committee from 1966 to 1970.

District of Columbia Organic Act of 1871

District of Columbia Organic ActOrganic Act of 1871an act of Congress in 1871
In order to build new infrastructure and make the city's government operate more efficiently, Congress passed the Organic Act of 1871, which created a new government for the entire federal territory.

District of Columbia Financial Control Board

financial control boardDistrict of Columbia Financial Responsibility and Management Assistance AuthorityControl Board
By 1995, the city had become nearly insolvent, which prompted the Congress to create the District of Columbia Financial Control Board.
The District attained limited home rule in 1973 and was for many years financially stable.

District of Columbia v. Heller

Parker v. District of ColumbiaD.C. v. HellerHeller
Efforts to roll back the city's gun laws were curtailed following the June 26, 2008, Supreme Court decision in District of Columbia v. Heller.
In February 2003, the six residents of District of Columbia filed a lawsuit in the District Court for the District of Columbia, challenging the constitutionality of provisions of the Firearms Control Regulations Act of 1975, a local law (part of the District of Columbia Code) enacted pursuant to District of Columbia home rule.

Marion Barry

Mayor Marion BarryMayor Marion S. Barry1990 arrest
The situation was a result of mismanagement and waste in the city's local government, particularly during the mayoralty of Marion Barry.
He also served as the leader of the Free D.C. Movement, strongly supporting increased home rule, as a Congressional committee exercised administrative rule over the district.

Firearms Control Regulations Act of 1975

DC gun banDistrict's ban on handgunsDistrict's law banning handguns
For example, legislation was passed in 1992 mandating a referendum on the use of the death penalty in the District, and bills to remove the District's strict gun control regulations have been continuously introduced in the Congress as well.

Constitution of the United States

United States ConstitutionU.S. ConstitutionConstitution
As the federal capital, the constitution grants the United States Congress exclusive jurisdiction over the District in "all cases whatsoever".

United States Congress

CongressU.S. CongressCongressional
As the federal capital, the constitution grants the United States Congress exclusive jurisdiction over the District in "all cases whatsoever".

U.S. state

StatestatesU. S. state
However, Congress maintains the power to overturn local laws and exercises greater oversight of the city than exists for any U.S. state.

Unrepresented Nations and Peoples Organization

UNPOUnrepresented Nations and Peoples OrganisationInternational Circassian Association
In 2015, D.C. became a member of the Unrepresented Nations and Peoples Organization.

James Madison

MadisonPresident MadisonPresident James Madison
James Madison explained the need for a federal district on January 23, 1788, in the Federalist No. 43, arguing that the national capital needed to be distinct from the states, in order to provide for its own maintenance and safety.

Philadelphia

Philadelphia, PennsylvaniaPhiladelphia, PACity of Philadelphia
An attack on the Congress at Philadelphia by a mob of angry soldiers, known as the Pennsylvania Mutiny of 1783, had emphasized the need for the government to see to its own security.

Pennsylvania Mutiny of 1783

protest outside the buildingdue to a mutinyJune 1783
An attack on the Congress at Philadelphia by a mob of angry soldiers, known as the Pennsylvania Mutiny of 1783, had emphasized the need for the government to see to its own security.

Article One of the United States Constitution

Article IArticle OneU.S. Const. art. I
Therefore, the authority to establish a federal capital was provided in Article I, Section 8 of the United States Constitution, which states that Congress shall have the power: