Divorce

divorceddivorceedivorcéedivorcingdiv.divorcédissolution of marriagedivorce papersex-wifeex-husband
Divorce, also known as dissolution of marriage, is the process of terminating a marriage or marital union.wikipedia
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Marriage

married couplesopposite-sex married couplesmarried
Divorce, also known as dissolution of marriage, is the process of terminating a marriage or marital union.
These changes included giving wives legal identities of their own, abolishing the right of husbands to physically discipline their wives, giving wives property rights, liberalizing divorce laws, providing wives with reproductive rights of their own, and requiring a wife's consent when sexual relations occur.

Child custody

custodycustody battlePhysical custody
Divorce laws vary considerably around the world, but in most countries divorce requires the sanction of a court or other authority in a legal process, which may involve issues of distribution of property, child custody, alimony (spousal support), child visitation / access, parenting time, child support, and division of debt.
Decisions about child custody typically arise in proceedings involving divorce, annulment, separation, adoption or parental death.

Child support

child maintenancesupportmaintenance
Divorce laws vary considerably around the world, but in most countries divorce requires the sanction of a court or other authority in a legal process, which may involve issues of distribution of property, child custody, alimony (spousal support), child visitation / access, parenting time, child support, and division of debt.
In family law, child support is often arranged as part of a divorce, marital separation, annulment, determination of parentage or dissolution of a civil union and may supplement alimony (spousal support) arrangements.

Annulment

annulledannulannullment
Divorce is different from annulment, which declares the marriage null and void, with legal separation or de jure separation (a legal process by which a married couple may formalize a de facto separation while remaining legally married) or with de facto separation (a process where the spouses informally stop cohabiting).
Unlike divorce, it is usually retroactive, meaning that an annulled marriage is considered to be invalid from the beginning almost as if it had never taken place (though some jurisdictions provide that the marriage is only void from the date of the annulment; for example, this is the case in section 12 of the Matrimonial Causes Act 1973 in England and Wales).

Division of property

equitable distributionproperty settlementdistribution of property
Divorce laws vary considerably around the world, but in most countries divorce requires the sanction of a court or other authority in a legal process, which may involve issues of distribution of property, child custody, alimony (spousal support), child visitation / access, parenting time, child support, and division of debt.
Division of property, also known as equitable distribution, is a judicial division of property rights and obligations between spouses during divorce.

Breakup

break uprelationship breakupbreak-up
When those that are in a common-law relationship break up, it's called a separation, not a divorce.
The term is less likely to be applied to a married couple, where a breakup is typically called a separation or divorce.

Marital separation

separatedseparationseparating
Divorce is different from annulment, which declares the marriage null and void, with legal separation or de jure separation (a legal process by which a married couple may formalize a de facto separation while remaining legally married) or with de facto separation (a process where the spouses informally stop cohabiting).
Marital separation occurs when spouses in a marriage stop living together without getting divorced.

No-fault divorce

no fault divorceno-faultno fault
In contrast, in some countries (such as Sweden, Finland, Australia, New Zealand), divorce is purely no fault.
No-fault divorce is a divorce in which the dissolution of a marriage does not require a showing of wrongdoing by either party.

Grounds for divorce

ground for divorcegrounds
Where it is seen as a contract, the refusal or inability of one spouse to perform the obligations stipulated in the contract may constitute a ground for divorce for the other spouse.
Grounds for divorce are regulations specifying the circumstances under which a person will be granted a divorce.

Contact (law)

visitationvisitation rightscontact
Divorce laws vary considerably around the world, but in most countries divorce requires the sanction of a court or other authority in a legal process, which may involve issues of distribution of property, child custody, alimony (spousal support), child visitation / access, parenting time, child support, and division of debt.
In the event of the breakdown of the relationship between a minor child's parents, a court may define or modify a parent's access rights to the child within the context of proceedings for legal separation, annulment, divorce or child custody.

Alimony

spousal supportmaintenancealimonies
Divorce laws vary considerably around the world, but in most countries divorce requires the sanction of a court or other authority in a legal process, which may involve issues of distribution of property, child custody, alimony (spousal support), child visitation / access, parenting time, child support, and division of debt.
Where a divorce or dissolution of marriage (civil union) is granted, either party may ask for post-marital alimony.

Divorce settlement

settlement
Less adversarial approaches to divorce settlements have recently emerged, such as mediation and collaborative divorce settlement, which negotiate mutually acceptable resolution to conflicts.
A divorce settlement is an arrangement, adjustment, or other understanding reached, as in financial or business proceedings between two adults who have chosen to divorce.

Condonation

condone
Fault-based divorces can be contested; evaluation of offenses may involve allegations of collusion of the parties (working together to get the divorce), or condonation (approving the offense), connivance (tricking someone into committing an offense), or provocation by the other party.
It is most frequently presented during divorce proceedings, though it is also used in other legal contexts.

Legal separation

separatedseparationjudicial separation
Divorce is different from annulment, which declares the marriage null and void, with legal separation or de jure separation (a legal process by which a married couple may formalize a de facto separation while remaining legally married) or with de facto separation (a process where the spouses informally stop cohabiting).
Legal separation does not automatically lead to divorce.

Grounds for divorce (United States)

Grounds For DivorceabandonmentDefenses to divorce in United States law
This is the case, for example, in many US states (see Grounds for divorce (United States)). Eventually, the idea that a marriage could be dissolved in cases in which one of the parties violated the sacred vow gradually allowed expansion of the grounds upon which divorce could be granted from those grounds which existed at the time of the marriage to grounds which occurred after the marriage, but which exemplified violation of that vow, such as abandonment, adultery, or "extreme cruelty".
If one decides to file a divorce, a no-fault divorce should be taken into consideration.

Adultery

adulterousaffairadulterer
Eventually, the idea that a marriage could be dissolved in cases in which one of the parties violated the sacred vow gradually allowed expansion of the grounds upon which divorce could be granted from those grounds which existed at the time of the marriage to grounds which occurred after the marriage, but which exemplified violation of that vow, such as abandonment, adultery, or "extreme cruelty".
However, even in jurisdictions that have decriminalised adultery, it may still have legal consequences, particularly in jurisdictions with fault-based divorce laws, where adultery almost always constitutes a ground for divorce and may be a factor in property settlement, the custody of children, the denial of alimony, etc. Adultery is not a ground for divorce in jurisdictions which have adopted a no-fault divorce model.

Divorce in Scotland

divorce laws in Scotlanddivorce under Scottish lawScotland
In the 21st century, many European countries have made changes to their divorce laws, in particular by reducing the length of the necessary periods of separation, e.g., Scotland in 2006 (1 or 2 years from the previous 2 or 5 years); France in 2005 (2 years from the previous 6 years), Switzerland in 2005 (2 years from the previous 4 years), Greece in 2008 (two years from the previous four years).
Divorce is now regulated by the Divorce (Scotland) Act 1976 as amended by the Family Law (Scotland) Act 2006, which provides two legal grounds for divorce: the "irretrievable breakdown of the marriage" or where one party has undergone gender reassignment surgery and obtained an interim gender recognition certificate.

Single parent

single mothersingle fathersingle mothers
Many times academic problems are associated with those children from single-parent families.
Divorce was generally rare historically (although this depends by culture and era), and divorce especially became very difficult to obtain after the fall of the Roman Empire, in Medieval Europe, due to strong involvement of ecclesiastical courts in family life (though annulment and other forms of separation were more common).

Wevorce

Some mediation companies, such as Wevorce, also pair clients with counselors, financial planners and other professionals to work through common mediation sticking points.
Wevorce is an American mediation legal technology company specializing in amicable divorce.

Get (divorce document)

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Jewish views of divorce differ, with Reform Judaism considering civil divorces adequate; Conservative and Orthodox Judaism, on the other hand, require that the husband grant his wife a divorce in the form of a get.
A get or gett (גט, plural gittin גיטין) is a divorce document in Jewish religious law which must be presented by a husband to his wife to effectuate their divorce.

Monogamy

monogamousserial monogamysocially monogamous
In most countries, monogamy is required by law, so divorce allows each former partner to marry another person.
Serial monogamy has always been closely linked to divorce practices.

Zelder paradox

In economics this is known as the Zelder Paradox, and is more common with marriages that have produced children, and less common with childless couples.
In economics, the Zelder paradox is the observation of Martin Zelder that welfare-reducing divorce is more likely when a couple has invested their efforts into love and children instead of money, possessions, and sex.

Legitimacy (family law)

illegitimatebastardillegitimacy
Under Orthodox law, children of an extramarital affair involving a married Jewish woman are considered mamzerim (illegitimate) and cannot marry non-mamzerim.
Legitimacy, in traditional Western common law, is the status of a child born to parents who are legally married to each other, and of a child conceived before the parents obtain a legal divorce.

Agunah

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A woman whose husband refuses to grant the get or a woman whose husband is missing without sufficient knowledge that he died, is called an agunah, is still married, and therefore cannot remarry.
It is used as a borrowed term to refer to a woman whose husband refuses, or is unable, to grant her a divorce document in Jewish religious law, known as a get.

Shared residency in England

Shared residency in English lawShared residencejoint
The report concluded that the percentage of shared residence orders would need to increase in order for more equitable financial divisions to become the norm.
Shared residence, joint residence, or shared parenting refers to the situation where a child of parents who have divorced or separated live with each parent at different times, such as every other week.