Dixie

Old SouthLand of DixieOld DixieSouthernU.S. South
Dixie (otherwise known as Dixieland) is a nickname for the Southern United States, especially those states that composed the Confederate States of America.wikipedia
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Southern United States

SouthSouthernAmerican South
Dixie (otherwise known as Dixieland) is a nickname for the Southern United States, especially those states that composed the Confederate States of America. As a definite geographic location within the United States, "Dixie" is usually defined as the eleven Southern states that seceded in late 1860 and early 1861 to form the new Confederate States of America.
The Southern United States, also known as the American South, Dixie, or simply the South, is a region of the United States of America.

Mason–Dixon line

Mason-Dixon lineMason-Dixonstate line
The term originally referred to the states south of the Mason–Dixon line, but now is more of a cultural reference, referring to parts of the southern United States.
It is still used today in the figurative sense of a line that separates the North and South politically and socially (see Dixie).

Alabama

ALState of AlabamaAlabamian
They are (in order of secession): South Carolina, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Texas, Virginia, Arkansas, North Carolina, and Tennessee.
Alabama is also known as the "Heart of Dixie" and the "Cotton State".

The Nine Nations of North America

Nine Nations of North AmericaThe Foundry (United States region)
The concept of "Dixie" as the location of a certain set of cultural assumptions, mind-sets and traditions (along with those of other regions in North America) was explored in the 1981 book The Nine Nations of North America.

Dixie (song)

DixieDixie's LandI Wish I Was in Dixie
The song likely cemented the word "Dixie" in the American vocabulary as a nickname for the Southern United States.

Dixieland

New Orleans jazzDixieland jazzhot jazz
Some of the latter consider Dixieland a derogatory term implying superficial hokum played without passion or deep understanding of the music and because "Dixie" is a reference to pre-Civil War Southern States.

Jeremiah Dixon

Dixon
It is possible that Dixon's name was the origin for the nickname Dixie used in reference to the U.S. Southern States, even though Dixon was actually affiliated with the Northern side of the line.

Confederate States of America

ConfederateConfederacyConfederate States
Dixie (otherwise known as Dixieland) is a nickname for the Southern United States, especially those states that composed the Confederate States of America. As a definite geographic location within the United States, "Dixie" is usually defined as the eleven Southern states that seceded in late 1860 and early 1861 to form the new Confederate States of America.

United States

AmericanU.S.USA
As a definite geographic location within the United States, "Dixie" is usually defined as the eleven Southern states that seceded in late 1860 and early 1861 to form the new Confederate States of America.

Secession in the United States

secessionsecessionistsecede
As a definite geographic location within the United States, "Dixie" is usually defined as the eleven Southern states that seceded in late 1860 and early 1861 to form the new Confederate States of America.

Secession

secedesecededsecessionist
They are (in order of secession): South Carolina, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Texas, Virginia, Arkansas, North Carolina, and Tennessee.

South Carolina

SCState of South CarolinaS.C.
They are (in order of secession): South Carolina, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Texas, Virginia, Arkansas, North Carolina, and Tennessee.

Mississippi

MSState of MississippiGeography of Mississippi
They are (in order of secession): South Carolina, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Texas, Virginia, Arkansas, North Carolina, and Tennessee.

Florida

FLState of FloridaFloridian
They are (in order of secession): South Carolina, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Texas, Virginia, Arkansas, North Carolina, and Tennessee.

Georgia (U.S. state)

GeorgiaGAState of Georgia
They are (in order of secession): South Carolina, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Texas, Virginia, Arkansas, North Carolina, and Tennessee.

Louisiana

LAState of LouisianaLouisiana, USA
They are (in order of secession): South Carolina, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Texas, Virginia, Arkansas, North Carolina, and Tennessee.

Texas

TXTexanState of Texas
They are (in order of secession): South Carolina, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Texas, Virginia, Arkansas, North Carolina, and Tennessee.

Virginia

Commonwealth of VirginiaVAState of Virginia
They are (in order of secession): South Carolina, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Texas, Virginia, Arkansas, North Carolina, and Tennessee.

Arkansas

ARState of ArkansasArkansan
They are (in order of secession): South Carolina, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Texas, Virginia, Arkansas, North Carolina, and Tennessee.

North Carolina

NCNorthState of North Carolina
They are (in order of secession): South Carolina, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Texas, Virginia, Arkansas, North Carolina, and Tennessee.

Tennessee

TNState of TennesseeTenn.
They are (in order of secession): South Carolina, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Texas, Virginia, Arkansas, North Carolina, and Tennessee.

Maryland

MDState of MarylandMaryland, USA
Maryland never seceded from the Union, but many of their citizens favored the Confederacy.

Missouri

MOState of MissouriMissouri, USA
Whilst many of Maryland's representatives were arrested to prevent secession, both the states of Missouri and Kentucky produced Ordinances of Secession and were (formally) admitted into the Confederacy.

Kentucky

KYCommonwealth of KentuckyKentuckian
Whilst many of Maryland's representatives were arrested to prevent secession, both the states of Missouri and Kentucky produced Ordinances of Secession and were (formally) admitted into the Confederacy.