Django (1966 film)

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Django is a 1966 Italian Spaghetti Western film directed and co-written by Sergio Corbucci, starring Franco Nero (in his breakthrough role) as the title character alongside Loredana Nusciak, José Bódalo, Ángel Álvarez and Eduardo Fajardo.wikipedia
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Django (character)

Djangotitle characterDjango Freeman
Django is a 1966 Italian Spaghetti Western film directed and co-written by Sergio Corbucci, starring Franco Nero (in his breakthrough role) as the title character alongside Loredana Nusciak, José Bódalo, Ángel Álvarez and Eduardo Fajardo.
Originally played by Franco Nero in the Italian film of the same name by Sergio Corbucci, he has appeared in 31 films since then.

Ángel Álvarez

Angel Alvarez
Django is a 1966 Italian Spaghetti Western film directed and co-written by Sergio Corbucci, starring Franco Nero (in his breakthrough role) as the title character alongside Loredana Nusciak, José Bódalo, Ángel Álvarez and Eduardo Fajardo.
He appeared in Spaghetti western films such as Navajo Joe, and Django in 1966 opposite Franco Nero.

José Bódalo

Jose BodaloJosé Bódalo Zúffoli
Django is a 1966 Italian Spaghetti Western film directed and co-written by Sergio Corbucci, starring Franco Nero (in his breakthrough role) as the title character alongside Loredana Nusciak, José Bódalo, Ángel Álvarez and Eduardo Fajardo.
He played the role of General Hugo Rodriguez in the 1966 film Django opposite Franco Nero; and also performed in Begin the Beguine, the film that won the 1982 Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film.

Eduardo Fajardo

Django is a 1966 Italian Spaghetti Western film directed and co-written by Sergio Corbucci, starring Franco Nero (in his breakthrough role) as the title character alongside Loredana Nusciak, José Bódalo, Ángel Álvarez and Eduardo Fajardo.
In 1950s he moved to Mexico, and when he came back to Spain he appeared in spaghetti westerns such as Gli eroi di Fort Worth (1965) by Martin Herbert, and Django (1966) by Sergio Corbucci.

Django Unchained

DjangoDjango FreemanDr. King Schultz
Nero also made a cameo appearance in Quentin Tarantino's 2012 film Django Unchained, as homage to Corbucci's original. On December 21, 2012, Rialto Pictures and Blue Underground re-released Django in dubbed and subtitled form in selected theatres to coincide with the release of Quentin Tarantino's Django Unchained.
Set in the Old West and Antebellum South, it is a highly stylized tribute to Spaghetti Westerns using an obvious revisionist history, in particular the 1966 Italian film Django by Sergio Corbucci, whose star Franco Nero has a cameo appearance.

Loredana Nusciak

Django is a 1966 Italian Spaghetti Western film directed and co-written by Sergio Corbucci, starring Franco Nero (in his breakthrough role) as the title character alongside Loredana Nusciak, José Bódalo, Ángel Álvarez and Eduardo Fajardo. Among the most well-received of the unofficial sequels are Django Kill... If You Live, Shoot! (starring Tomas Milian), Ten Thousand Dollars for a Massacre (starring Gianni Garko and Loredana Nusciak), Django, Prepare a Coffin (produced by Manolo Bolognini and starring Terence Hill in a role originally intended for Franco Nero) and Django the Bastard (starring Anthony Steffen).
After making her film debut in A Difficult Life (1961), Nusciak achieved some popularity in the sixties thanks to her roles in a number of genre films, including L'uomo che viene da Canyon City (1965) and Django (1966); starting from seventies, she thinned out her acting activity, appearing in just four more films.

Luis Bacalov

Luis Enríquez BacalovLuis Enriquez BacalovLuis Enrique Bacalov
A commercial success upon release, Django has garnered a large cult following outside of Italy and is widely regarded as one of the best films of the Spaghetti Western genre, with the direction, Nero's performance, and Luis Bacalov's soundtrack most frequently being praised.
His film credits include westerns such as Django, A Bullet for the General, and The Grand Duel, and Italian crime films such as Caliber 9, Il Boss and Mister Scarface.

Django Strikes Again

Django 2Django 2: il grande ritorno
Nero reprised his role as Django in 1987's Django Strikes Again, the only official sequel produced with Corbucci's involvement.
It is the only official sequel to Django.

Sergio Corbucci

Sergio
Django is a 1966 Italian Spaghetti Western film directed and co-written by Sergio Corbucci, starring Franco Nero (in his breakthrough role) as the title character alongside Loredana Nusciak, José Bódalo, Ángel Álvarez and Eduardo Fajardo.
Corbucci's first commercial success was with the cult spaghetti western Django, starring Franco Nero, the leading man in many of his movies.

Franco Nero

Django is a 1966 Italian Spaghetti Western film directed and co-written by Sergio Corbucci, starring Franco Nero (in his breakthrough role) as the title character alongside Loredana Nusciak, José Bódalo, Ángel Álvarez and Eduardo Fajardo. Among the most well-received of the unofficial sequels are Django Kill... If You Live, Shoot! (starring Tomas Milian), Ten Thousand Dollars for a Massacre (starring Gianni Garko and Loredana Nusciak), Django, Prepare a Coffin (produced by Manolo Bolognini and starring Terence Hill in a role originally intended for Franco Nero) and Django the Bastard (starring Anthony Steffen).
He is best known for his breakthrough role as the title character in Sergio Corbucci's Spaghetti Western film Django (1966), a role that he reprised in Nello Rossati's Django Strikes Again (1987).

Cameo appearance

cameocameo rolecameos
Nero also made a cameo appearance in Quentin Tarantino's 2012 film Django Unchained, as homage to Corbucci's original.
Franco Nero, the actor who portrayed the Django character in the original 1966 film, appears in a bar scene of the Tarantino film Django Unchained.

Minnesota Clay

The destruction of the lead character's hands prior to the final showdown was influenced by Corbucci's previous film, Minnesota Clay, which depicted a blind protagonist who attempts to overcome his disability.
This more pessimistic ending is in the style of Corbucci's later masterpieces, Django and The Great Silence.

Mark Damon

Foresight UnlimitedMDP Worldwide
Actor Mark Damon has also claimed to have collaborated with Corbucci on the story prior to the film's production.
He was considered for the role of Django (1966) and a role done by Tomas Milian in Boccaccio '70 (1962).

Ruggero Deodato

According to Ruggero Deodato, Corbucci's assistant director, the director borrowed the idea of a protagonist who dragged a coffin behind him from a comic magazine he found on a news-stand in Via Veneto, Rome.
Through a friendship with the son of Rossellini, it was there that he learned how to direct under Roberto Rossellini and Sergio Corbucci; he helped to make Corbucci's The Slave and Django as an assistant director.

Yojimbo

Yojimbo (film)Yojimbo'' (film)
Intended to capitalize on and rival the success of Sergio Leone's A Fistful of Dollars, Corbucci's film is, like Leone's, considered to be a loose, unofficial adaptation of Akira Kurosawa's Yojimbo.
A second, looser Spaghetti Western adaptation, Django, was directed by Sergio Corbucci in 1966 and featured Franco Nero in the title role.

The Great Silence

Il grande silenzioIl grande silenzio / The Great Silence
Corbucci was at first dissatisfied with the muddy street of the Elios set (he initially wanted the film to be set in snowy locations, foreshadowing his work on The Great Silence), but was eventually persuaded by Bolognini and his wife, Nori Corbucci, to use the muddy locations.
He had previously considered snowed-in valleys as the setting of Django, although the prior film took place in muddy conditions due to time and budget constraints.

Franco Rossetti

Corbucci and Vivarelli's outline was then revised by Franco Rossetti.
With the rise of the spaghetti western genre Rossetti developed solid reputation as a screenwriter, especially thanks to the screenplays of Django, Texas, Adios and Johnny Oro.

Spaghetti Western

spaghetti westernsZapata Westernspaghetti-western
Django is a 1966 Italian Spaghetti Western film directed and co-written by Sergio Corbucci, starring Franco Nero (in his breakthrough role) as the title character alongside Loredana Nusciak, José Bódalo, Ángel Álvarez and Eduardo Fajardo.
Use of pathos received a big boost with Sergio Corbucci's influential Django.

Carlo Simi

Most interior and exterior shots were filmed on the Elios Film set outside of Rome, which included a dilapidated Western town renovated by Carlo Simi, a veteran of both Corbucci and Leone's films.

Texas, Adios

Texas Adios
The original DVD was included, along with Django Kill... If You Live, Shoot!, Keoma and Texas, Adios, as part of a four-disc set titled Spaghetti Westerns Unchained on May 21, 2013.
It is often referenced in connection with Django, also starring Nero, and although was referred to as Django 2 in some countries, it is not considered a sequel.

Rialto Pictures

On December 21, 2012, Rialto Pictures and Blue Underground re-released Django in dubbed and subtitled form in selected theatres to coincide with the release of Quentin Tarantino's Django Unchained.

Django, Prepare a Coffin

Preparati la bara!Preparati La BaraViva Django
Among the most well-received of the unofficial sequels are Django Kill... If You Live, Shoot! (starring Tomas Milian), Ten Thousand Dollars for a Massacre (starring Gianni Garko and Loredana Nusciak), Django, Prepare a Coffin (produced by Manolo Bolognini and starring Terence Hill in a role originally intended for Franco Nero) and Django the Bastard (starring Anthony Steffen).
The film stars Terence Hill in the title role, which was previously played by Franco Nero in Sergio Corbucci's original film. Django, Prepare a Coffin is unique among the plethora of films which capitalized on Corbucci's in that it is not only a semi-official, legitimate follow-up, but was also originally intended to star Nero.

The Harder They Come

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The 1972 Jamaican film, The Harder They Come, contains a sequence where the hero, Ivan, watches Django in a cinema, which has echoes with his character and story.
He meets Jose, who takes him to see Django, a Spaghetti Western.

Rocky Roberts

Rocky Roberts & The AiredalesRocky Roberts and the Airedales
The main titles theme, which was conducted by Bruno Nicolai and features lyrics by Franco Migliacci and Robert Mellin, was sung in English for the film by Rocky Roberts.
Roberts sang the Luis Bacalov-written theme song from the 1966 film, Django.

Sukiyaki Western Django

Sukiyaki Western: Django
Takashi Miike's 2007 film, Sukiyaki Western Django, is a highly stylized Western film inspired by Django, Yojimbo and A Fistful of Dollars.
The title of the film refers to the Japanese dish sukiyaki as well as Sergio Corbucci's spaghetti western film Django. The film was produced by Sedic International, Geneon Universal Entertainment, Sony Pictures Entertainment, Dentsu, TV Asahi, Shogakukan, A-Team, Nagoya Broadcasting Network and Tokyu Recreation.