Djibouti Armed Forces

Djiboutia base in DjiboutiArmoured Regiment of DjiboutiDjiboutian military
The Djibouti Armed Forces (DJAF) (الجيش الجيبوتي, Ciidanka Jabuuti) are the military forces of Djibouti.wikipedia
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Djiboutian Army

Republican Guard
They consist of the Djiboutian Army and its sub-branches the Djibouti Air Force and Djiboutian Navy.
The Djiboutian Army is the largest branch of the Djibouti Armed Forces and is based in the Djiboutian capital of Djibouti City.

Djiboutian Navy

They consist of the Djiboutian Army and its sub-branches the Djibouti Air Force and Djiboutian Navy.
The Djiboutian Navy (Garde-Cotes), (Ciidanka Badda Jabuuti) is the naval service branch of the Djibouti Armed Forces.

Djibouti Air Force

currentForce Aérienne du DjiboutiForce Aérienne du Djibouti (Djiboti Air Force)
They consist of the Djiboutian Army and its sub-branches the Djibouti Air Force and Djiboutian Navy.
It was established as part of the Djibouti Armed Forces after the country obtained its independence on June 27, 1977.

Djibouti

Republic of DjiboutiDjiboutianDjibuti
The Djibouti Armed Forces (DJAF) (الجيش الجيبوتي, Ciidanka Jabuuti) are the military forces of Djibouti.
The Djibouti Armed Forces include the Djibouti National Army, which consists of the Coastal Navy, the Djiboutian Air Force (Force Aerienne Djiboutienne, FAD), and the National Gendarmerie (GN).

African Union Mission to Somalia (2007–present)

AMISOMAfrican Union Mission to SomaliaAfrican Union Mission in Somalia
In 2011, Djibouti troops also joined the African Union Mission to Somalia.

Camp Lemonnier

Camp LemonierDjiboutiJoint Task Force Horn of Africa
There is also Combined Joint Task Force - Horn of Africa, a U.S. force of more than 3,500, currently deployed in the country at Camp Lemonnier.
After use by the French Foreign Legion, the facility was operated by the Djibouti Armed Forces.

Djiboutian Civil War

civil wararmed conflictcivil war of the 1990s
The first war which involved the Djiboutian armed forces was the Djiboutian Civil War between the Djiboutian government, supported by France, and the Front for the Restoration of Unity and Democracy (FRUD).

Djiboutian–Eritrean border conflict

2008 border clashes2008 border dispute2008 Djiboutian-Eritrean border conflict
The 2008 border clashes at least temporarily swelled the ranks of the Djiboutian army, with retired personnel being recalled, but the military’s size and capabilities are much reduced since the 1990s.

Djiboutian National Gendarmerie

Gendarmerie
The Djiboutian National Gendarmerie (Gendarmerie Nationale Djiboutienne) is a branch of the Djibouti Armed Forces, in charge of public safety, with police duties among the civilian population.

Military ranks of Djibouti

The Military ranks of Djibouti are the military insignia used by the Djibouti Armed Forces.

Regiment

Infantry Regimentregimentalregiments
As of 2018, the Djibouti Armed Forces consists of 20,470 (2018 est.) ground troops, which are divided into several regiments and battalions garrisoned in various areas throughout the country.

Battalion

infantry battalionRegimentbattalion commander
As of 2018, the Djibouti Armed Forces consists of 20,470 (2018 est.) ground troops, which are divided into several regiments and battalions garrisoned in various areas throughout the country.

Bab-el-Mandeb

Bab al-MandabBab el MandebBab el-Mandeb
Djibouti Armed Forces are an important player in the Bab-el-Mandeb and Red Sea.

Red Sea

Redthe Red SeaErythraean Sea
Djibouti Armed Forces are an important player in the Bab-el-Mandeb and Red Sea.

Sultan

SultanateSultansSulṭān
Djibouti's many Sultanates each maintained regular troops.

Shewa

ShoaSelaleShewa Province
In the early Middle Ages, the conquest of Shewa by the Ifat Sultanate ignited a rivalry for supremacy with the Solomonic Dynasty.

Sultanate of Ifat

Ifat SultanateIfatKingdom of Ifat
In the early Middle Ages, the conquest of Shewa by the Ifat Sultanate ignited a rivalry for supremacy with the Solomonic Dynasty.

Solomonic dynasty

House of SolomonEthiopian Imperial FamilySolomonic
In the early Middle Ages, the conquest of Shewa by the Ifat Sultanate ignited a rivalry for supremacy with the Solomonic Dynasty.

Adal Sultanate

AdalSultanate of AdalAdal Kingdom
Many similar battles were fought between the succeeding Sultanate of Adal and the Solomonids, with both sides achieving victory and suffering defeat.

Abyssinian–Adal war

Conquest of AbyssiniaEthiopian-Adal WarEthiopian–Adal War
During the protracted Ethiopian-Adal War (1529–1559), Imam Ahmad ibn Ibrihim al-Ghazi defeated several Ethiopian Emperors and embarked on a conquest referred to as the Futuh Al-Habash ("Conquest of Abyssinia"), which brought three-quarters of Christian Abyssinia under the power of the Muslim Adal Sultanate.

Imam

imamsImāmImaam
During the protracted Ethiopian-Adal War (1529–1559), Imam Ahmad ibn Ibrihim al-Ghazi defeated several Ethiopian Emperors and embarked on a conquest referred to as the Futuh Al-Habash ("Conquest of Abyssinia"), which brought three-quarters of Christian Abyssinia under the power of the Muslim Adal Sultanate.

Ahmad ibn Ibrahim al-Ghazi

Ahmad GragnAhmad ibn Ibrihim al-GhaziAhmed Gragn
During the protracted Ethiopian-Adal War (1529–1559), Imam Ahmad ibn Ibrihim al-Ghazi defeated several Ethiopian Emperors and embarked on a conquest referred to as the Futuh Al-Habash ("Conquest of Abyssinia"), which brought three-quarters of Christian Abyssinia under the power of the Muslim Adal Sultanate.

Emperor of Ethiopia

Emperornəgusä nägästEmpress of Ethiopia
During the protracted Ethiopian-Adal War (1529–1559), Imam Ahmad ibn Ibrihim al-Ghazi defeated several Ethiopian Emperors and embarked on a conquest referred to as the Futuh Al-Habash ("Conquest of Abyssinia"), which brought three-quarters of Christian Abyssinia under the power of the Muslim Adal Sultanate.

Muslims

MuslimMoslemMoslems
During the protracted Ethiopian-Adal War (1529–1559), Imam Ahmad ibn Ibrihim al-Ghazi defeated several Ethiopian Emperors and embarked on a conquest referred to as the Futuh Al-Habash ("Conquest of Abyssinia"), which brought three-quarters of Christian Abyssinia under the power of the Muslim Adal Sultanate.

Ottoman Empire

OttomanOttomansTurks
Al-Ghazi's forces and their Ottoman allies came close to extinguishing the ancient Ethiopian kingdom, but the Abyssinians managed to secure the assistance of Cristóvão da Gama's Portuguese troops and maintain their domain's autonomy.