Dollar sign

$dollar symbolpeso sign$ sign$" symboldollardollar and peso symbolsDollar sign [$] dollar signsdollar-like sign
The dollar or peso sign ($ or ) is a symbol primarily used to indicate the various units of currency around the world.wikipedia
298 Related Articles

United States dollar

$US$USD
The sign is first attested in Spanish American, American, Canadian, Mexican and other British business correspondence in the 1770s, referring to the Spanish American peso, also known as "Spanish dollar" or "piece of eight" in North America, which provided the model for the currency that the United States adopted in 1792 and the larger coins of the new Spanish American republics such as the Mexican peso, Peruvian eight-real and Bolivian eight-sol coins.
The United States dollar (sign: $; code: USD; also abbreviated US$ and referred to as the dollar, U.S. dollar, or American dollar) is the official currency of the United States and its territories per the United States Constitution since 1792.

Mexican peso

pesosMXNpeso
The sign is first attested in Spanish American, American, Canadian, Mexican and other British business correspondence in the 1770s, referring to the Spanish American peso, also known as "Spanish dollar" or "piece of eight" in North America, which provided the model for the currency that the United States adopted in 1792 and the larger coins of the new Spanish American republics such as the Mexican peso, Peruvian eight-real and Bolivian eight-sol coins.
Modern peso and dollar currencies have a common origin in the 15th–19th century-Spanish dollar, most continuing to use its sign, "$".

Spanish dollar

pieces of eightpesospiece of eight
The sign is first attested in Spanish American, American, Canadian, Mexican and other British business correspondence in the 1770s, referring to the Spanish American peso, also known as "Spanish dollar" or "piece of eight" in North America, which provided the model for the currency that the United States adopted in 1792 and the larger coins of the new Spanish American republics such as the Mexican peso, Peruvian eight-real and Bolivian eight-sol coins. The coin, also known as Spanish dollar, was the first global currency used in the entire world since the Spanish Empire was the first global empire.
Diverse theories link the origin of the "$" symbol to the columns and stripes that appear on one side of the Spanish dollar.

Oliver Pollock

Robert Morris was the first to use this symbol in official documents and in official communications with Oliver Pollock.
He is often attributed with the creation of the U.S. Dollar sign in 1778.

Scribal abbreviation

siglumsiglaabbreviations
This explanation holds that the sign evolved out of the Spanish and Spanish American scribal abbreviation "pˢ" for pesos.
Other scribal abbreviations in modern typographic use are the percentage sign, from the Italian per cento ("per hundred"); the permille sign, from the Italian per mille ("per thousand"); the pound sign (₤, £ and #, all descending from ℔ or lb, librum) and the dollar sign, which possibly derives from the Spanish word Peso.

Sigil (computer programming)

sigilsigilssuffixes
$ is prefixed to names to define variables in the PHP language and the AutoIt automation script language, scalar variables in the Perl language (see sigil (computer programming)), and global variables in the Ruby language. In Perl programming this includes scalar elements of arrays $array[7] and hashes $hash{foo}.
The best known example of a sigil in BASIC is the dollar sign appended to the names of all strings.

PHP

PDOPHP programming languageP'''HP
$ is prefixed to names to define variables in the PHP language and the AutoIt automation script language, scalar variables in the Perl language (see sigil (computer programming)), and global variables in the Ruby language. In Perl programming this includes scalar elements of arrays $array[7] and hashes $hash{foo}.
Variables are prefixed with a dollar symbol, and a type does not need to be specified in advance.

Pillars of Hercules

Pillar of HerculesHercules' PillarsPillars of Heracles
A common hypothesis holds that the sign derives from the symbolic representation of the Pillars of Hercules. In 1492, Ferdinand II of Aragon adopted the symbol of the Pillars of Hercules and added the Latin warning Non plus ultra meaning "nothing further beyond", indicating "this is the end of the (known) world".
Dollar sign

Dollar

$dollarsUS$
In addition to those countries of the world that use dollars or pesos, a number of other countries use the $ symbol to denote their currencies, including:
Dollar (often represented by the dollar sign $) is the name of more than 20 currencies, including those of Australia, Canada, Hong Kong, Jamaica, Liberia, Namibia, New Zealand, Singapore, Taiwan, and the United States, whose US dollar is also the official currency of Caribbean Netherlands, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, Federated States of Micronesia, Marshall Islands, Palau, Panama, and Zimbabwe.

ASCII

7-bit ASCIIAmerican Standard Code for Information InterchangeASCII printable characters
In most shell scripting languages, $ is used for interpolating (substitution of) environment variables, special variables, arithmetic computations and special characters, and for performing translation of localised strings. Christopher Stratchey's GPM, the inspiration for the Multics shell, used the non-ASCII symbol § for macro expansion.

Cifrão

$real sign
Some currencies use the cifrão, similar to the dollar sign, but always with two strokes:
The cifrão is a currency sign similar to the dollar sign but always written with two vertical lines:.

Sass (stylesheet language)

SassSCSSSass stylesheets
In Sass, the $ sign is prefixed to define a variable.
Variables begin with a dollar sign ($).

Sed

Stream editor
$ matches the end of a line or string in sed, grep, and POSIX and Perl regular expressions, and, as a result:
The dollar sign matches the end of the line.

Philippine peso sign

An exception is the Philippine peso, whose sign is written as ₱.
This insignia of the Philippine peso is native to the Philippines, while the other countries having peso as the main currency use the dollar sign as their symbol.

Euro sign

currency symboleuro currency symbol
Euro sign
In English, the euro sign—like the dollar sign and the pound sign —is placed before the figure, unspaced, as used by publications such as the Financial Times and The Economist.

Argentina

🇦🇷ArgentineARG
However, in Argentina, the $ sign is always used for pesos, and if they want to indicate dollars, they always write U$S 5 or US$5 (5 US dollars).

Samoan tālā

talatālāSamoan
Samoan tālā (a transliteration of the word dollar)

Currency

currenciesforeign currencycoinage
The dollar or peso sign ($ or ) is a symbol primarily used to indicate the various units of currency around the world.

Coat of arms of Spain

coat of armsSpanish coat of armsarms of Spain
This representation can have either a banner separately around each pillar, or, as in the Spanish coat of arms, a banner curling between them.

Ferdinand II of Aragon

FerdinandFerdinand IIKing Ferdinand
In 1492, Ferdinand II of Aragon adopted the symbol of the Pillars of Hercules and added the Latin warning Non plus ultra meaning "nothing further beyond", indicating "this is the end of the (known) world".

Plus ultra

non plus ultraPlus OultrePLVS VLTRA
But when Christopher Columbus came to America, the legend was changed to Plus ultra, meaning "further beyond".

New World

NewThe New WorldAmericas
The Pillars of Hercules wrapped in a banner thus became a symbol of the New World.

Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor

Charles VEmperor Charles VCharles I
The symbol was adopted by Charles V and was part of his coat of arms representing Spain's American possessions.

Kingdom of Great Britain

Great BritainBritishBritain
The sign is first attested in Spanish American, American, Canadian, Mexican and other British business correspondence in the 1770s, referring to the Spanish American peso, also known as "Spanish dollar" or "piece of eight" in North America, which provided the model for the currency that the United States adopted in 1792 and the larger coins of the new Spanish American republics such as the Mexican peso, Peruvian eight-real and Bolivian eight-sol coins. When the United States gained their independence from Great Britain, they created the US dollar, but in its early decades they continued to use the Spanish dollar, which was more trusted in all markets.