Dolomite (mineral)

dolomitedolomiticcalcium magnesium carbonatedolomitic lime dolomiticBudaörs dolomitedolmitedolomite (magnesium limestone)dolomitic limestoneTechnological dolomite
Dolomite is an anhydrous carbonate mineral composed of calcium magnesium carbonate, ideally CaMg(CO 3 ) 2.wikipedia
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Carbonate minerals

carbonate mineralcarbonatecarbonates
Dolomite is an anhydrous carbonate mineral composed of calcium magnesium carbonate, ideally CaMg(CO 3 ) 2.

Dolomite (rock)

dolomitedolomiticmagnesian limestone
An alternative name sometimes used for the dolomitic rock type is dolostone.
Dolomite (also known as dolostone, dolomite rock or dolomitic rock) is a sedimentary carbonate rock that contains a high percentage of the mineral dolomite, CaMg(CO 3 ) 2.

Magnesium

MgMg 2+ Mg2+
Dolomite is an anhydrous carbonate mineral composed of calcium magnesium carbonate, ideally CaMg(CO 3 ) 2.
It is found in large deposits of magnesite, dolomite, and other minerals, and in mineral waters, where magnesium ion is soluble.

Carbonate

carbonatescarbonaceousCO 3
Dolomite is an anhydrous carbonate mineral composed of calcium magnesium carbonate, ideally CaMg(CO 3 ) 2.
The most common are calcite or calcium carbonate, CaCO 3, the chief constituent of limestone (as well as the main component of mollusc shells and coral skeletons); dolomite, a calcium-magnesium carbonate CaMg(CO 3 ) 2 ; and siderite, or iron(II) carbonate, FeCO 3, an important iron ore.

Hexagonal crystal family

Trigonalhexagonalrhombohedral
The mineral dolomite crystallizes in the trigonal-rhombohedral system.

Carbonate rock

carbonatecarbonatescarbonate rocks
The term is also used for a sedimentary carbonate rock composed mostly of the mineral dolomite.
The two major types are limestone, which is composed of calcite or aragonite (different crystal forms of CaCO 3 ) and dolomite rock, also known as dolostone, which is composed of mineral dolomite (CaMg(CO 3 ) 2 ).

Calcium

CaCa 2+ calcium ions
Dolomite is an anhydrous carbonate mineral composed of calcium magnesium carbonate, ideally CaMg(CO 3 ) 2.
Minerals of the first type include limestone, dolomite, marble, chalk, and iceland spar; aragonite beds make up the Bahamas, the Florida Keys, and the Red Sea basins.

Kutnohorite

Solid solution exists between dolomite, the iron-dominant ankerite and the manganese-dominant kutnohorite.
It forms a series with dolomite, and with ankerite.

Sedimentary rock

sedimentarysedimentary rockssediments
The term is also used for a sedimentary carbonate rock composed mostly of the mineral dolomite.
Carbonate rocks dominantly consist of carbonate minerals such as calcite, aragonite or dolomite.

Ankerite

ankeritic
Solid solution exists between dolomite, the iron-dominant ankerite and the manganese-dominant kutnohorite.
In composition it is closely related to dolomite, but differs from this in having magnesium replaced by varying amounts of iron(II) and manganese.

Nicolas Théodore de Saussure

Nicolas-Théodore de SaussureNicolas Theodore de SaussureTheodore de Saussure
Nicolas-Théodore de Saussure first named the mineral (after Dolomieu) in March 1792.
In other research in the physical sciences, he named the mineral dolomite after Déodat Gratet de Dolomieu, in March 1792.

Huntite

The mineral dolomite is closely related to huntite Mg 3 Ca(CO 3 ) 4.
Huntite often occurs in combination with other Mg/Ca carbonates such as dolomite, magnesite, and hydromagnesite.

Iron

FeFe 2+ Fe(III)
Solid solution exists between dolomite, the iron-dominant ankerite and the manganese-dominant kutnohorite.
A flux such as limestone (calcium carbonate) or dolomite (calcium-magnesium carbonate) is also added to the furnace's load.

Limestone

limestonescalcareouslime
Where calcite limestone is uncommon or too costly, dolomite is sometimes used in its place as a flux for the smelting of iron and steel.
A closely related rock is dolomite, which contains a high percentage of the mineral dolomite, CaMg(CO 3 ) 2.

Magnesite

magnasite
Reproducible, inorganic low-temperature syntheses of dolomite and magnesite were published for the first time in 1999.
Magnesite can also be formed by way of metasomatism in skarn deposits, in dolomitic limestones, associated with wollastonite, periclase, and talc.

Dolomitization

dolomitizeddolomitisedaltered
Dolomitization is a geological process by which the carbonate mineral dolomite is formed when magnesium ions replace calcium ions in another carbonate mineral, calcite.

Float glass

float glass processfloat processglass
Large quantities of processed dolomite are used in the production of float glass.
Float glass uses common glass-making raw materials, typically consisting of sand, soda ash (sodium carbonate), dolomite, limestone, and salt cake (sodium sulfate) etc. Other materials may be used as colourants, refining agents or to adjust the physical and chemical properties of the glass.

Ore

oresore depositmineral deposit
It is an important petroleum reservoir rock, and serves as the host rock for large strata-bound Mississippi Valley-Type (MVT) ore deposits of base metals such as lead, zinc, and copper.

Evaporite

evaporitesevaporiticevaporite deposits

Anhydrous

waterlessfree from the presence of water
Dolomite is an anhydrous carbonate mineral composed of calcium magnesium carbonate, ideally CaMg(CO 3 ) 2.

Carl Linnaeus

LinnaeusL.Carl von Linné
Most probably the mineral dolomite was first described by Carl Linnaeus in 1768.

Natural history

naturalistnaturalistsnatural historian
In 1791, it was described as a rock by the French naturalist and geologist Déodat Gratet de Dolomieu (1750–1801), first in buildings of the old city of Rome, and later as samples collected in the mountains now known as the Dolomite Alps of northern Italy.

Geologist

geologistsgeoscientistgeoscientists
In 1791, it was described as a rock by the French naturalist and geologist Déodat Gratet de Dolomieu (1750–1801), first in buildings of the old city of Rome, and later as samples collected in the mountains now known as the Dolomite Alps of northern Italy.

Déodat Gratet de Dolomieu

DolomieuDéodat de DolomieuDeodat Gratet de Dolomieu
In 1791, it was described as a rock by the French naturalist and geologist Déodat Gratet de Dolomieu (1750–1801), first in buildings of the old city of Rome, and later as samples collected in the mountains now known as the Dolomite Alps of northern Italy.

Dolomites

DolomiteDolomite MountainsDolomiti
In 1791, it was described as a rock by the French naturalist and geologist Déodat Gratet de Dolomieu (1750–1801), first in buildings of the old city of Rome, and later as samples collected in the mountains now known as the Dolomite Alps of northern Italy.