Domestic worker

servantdomestic servantdomestic serviceservantsmanservantdomestic servantsdomesticdomestic workersdomestic workdomestic servitude
A domestic worker is a person who works within an employer's household.wikipedia
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Slavery

slaveslavesenslaved
In many jurisdictions, domestic work is poorly regulated and domestic workers are subject to serious abuses, including slavery.
In other areas, slavery (or unfree labour) continues through practices such as debt bondage, the most widespread form of slavery today, serfdom, domestic servants kept in captivity, certain adoptions in which children are forced to work as slaves, child soldiers, and forced marriage.

Housekeeping

cleaninghousekeeperhousehold chores
Domestic helpers perform a variety of household services for an individual or a family, from providing care for children and elderly dependents to housekeeping, including cleaning and household maintenance.
A housekeeper is a person employed to manage a household and the domestic staff.

Edwardian era

EdwardianEdwardian periodEdwardian England
In Britain a highly developed system of domestic service peaked towards the close of the Victorian era, perhaps reaching its most complicated and rigidly structured state during the Edwardian period (a period known in the United States as the Gilded Age and in France as the Belle Époque), which reflected the limited social mobility before World War I.
Below the upper class, the era was marked by significant shifts in politics among sections of society that had largely been excluded from power, such as labourers, servants, and the industrial working class.

Household

householdshead of the householddomestic life
A domestic worker is a person who works within an employer's household.
In feudal societies, the Royal Household and medieval households of the wealthy included servants and other retainers.

Migrant domestic workers

foreign-born domestic workersmigrant domestic workermigrant domestic workers''.
The demand for domestic workers has also become primarily fulfilled by migrant domestic workers from other countries who flock to wealthier nations to fulfill the demand for help at home.
Starting in the mid-19th century, the employment of a domestic worker became a status symbol for bourgeois households and a civilizing mission to young female servants coming from the countryside in search for education, lodging and income.

National Domestic Workers Alliance

National Domestic Workers' Alliance
However, in recent years, advocacy groups like the National Domestic Workers' Alliance have succeeded in passing a Domestic Workers' Bill of Rights into state law in New York, Hawaii, and California.
The National Domestic Workers Alliance is an advocacy organization promoting the rights of domestic workers in the United States.

Domestic Worker's Bill of Rights

Domestic Workers' Bill of RightsDomestic Workers Bill of RightsNew York Domestic Worker's Bill of Rights
However, in recent years, advocacy groups like the National Domestic Workers' Alliance have succeeded in passing a Domestic Workers' Bill of Rights into state law in New York, Hawaii, and California.
A Domestic Workers' Bill of Rights is legislation designed to grant basic labor protections to domestic workers.

Convention on Domestic Workers

Domestic Workers ConventionDomestic Workers Convention, 2011Convention 189 on Domestic Workers
In 2011, the International Labour Organization adopted the Convention Concerning Decent Work for Domestic Workers.
The Convention on Domestic Workers, formally the Convention concerning Decent Work for Domestic Workers is a convention setting labour standards for domestic workers.

Belle Époque

Belle EpoqueLa Belle ÉpoqueBelle-Époque
In Britain a highly developed system of domestic service peaked towards the close of the Victorian era, perhaps reaching its most complicated and rigidly structured state during the Edwardian period (a period known in the United States as the Gilded Age and in France as the Belle Époque), which reflected the limited social mobility before World War I.
The Paris Metro underground railway system joined the omnibus and streetcar in transporting the working population, including those servants who did not live in the wealthy centers of cities.

Restavek

restavec
Usually, in a practice often called “confiage” or entrusting, such as for restaveks in Haiti, parents in the rural poverty make an agreement with someone in the cities who would house and send their child to school in return for domestic work.
A restavek (or restavec) is a child in Haiti who is sent by their parents to work for a host household as a domestic servant because the parents lack the resources required to support the child.

Foreign domestic helpers in Hong Kong

foreign domestic helpersdomestic workersdomestic helper
(See Foreign domestic helpers in Hong Kong)
Foreign domestic helpers in Hong Kong are domestic workers employed by Hongkongers, typically families.

Blouse

silk blouseblousessilk blouses
Female servants wore long, plain, dark-coloured dresses or black skirts with white belts and white blouses, and black shoes, and male servants and butlers would wear something from a simple suit, or a white dress shirt, often with tie, and knickers.
A simple blouse with a plain skirt was the standard dress for the newly expanded female (non-domestic) workforce of the 1890s, especially for those employed in office work.

Butler

stewarddispenserUnder Butler
A butler is a domestic worker in a large household.

Au pair

au-pairAu pairsaupair
The title comes from the French term au pair, meaning "at par" or "equal to", indicating that the relationship is intended to be one of equals: the au pair is intended to become a member of the family, albeit a temporary one, rather than a traditional domestic worker.

Victorian era

VictorianVictorian-eraVictorian period
In Britain a highly developed system of domestic service peaked towards the close of the Victorian era, perhaps reaching its most complicated and rigidly structured state during the Edwardian period (a period known in the United States as the Gilded Age and in France as the Belle Époque), which reflected the limited social mobility before World War I.
Some children undertook work as apprentices to respectable trades, such as building, or as domestic servants (there were over 120,000 domestic servants in London in the mid 19th century).

Between maid

Tweenybetween staffbetween-maid
A between maid (nickname tweeny, also called hall girl particularly in the United States) was a female junior domestic worker in a large household with many staff.

Charwoman

charwomencharladywasherwoman
A charwoman, chargirl, or char, jokingly charlady, is an old-fashioned occupational term, referring to a paid part-time worker who comes into a house or other building to clean it for a few hours of a day or week, as opposed to a maid, who usually lives as part of the household within the structure of domestic service.

Cleaner

cleaningcleaning ladywasherwoman
A cleaner or a cleaning operative is a type of industrial or domestic worker who cleans homes or commercial premises for payment.

Footman

footmenfoot-boyfootman or footboy
A footman or footboy is a male domestic worker.

Amah (occupation)

amahayahayahs
It is a domestic servant role which combines functions of maid and nanny.

Room

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In some cases, they sleep in the kitchen or small rooms, such as a box room, sometimes located in the basement or attic.
Other box rooms may house a live-in domestic worker.

Hall boy

hallboy
The hall boy or hallboy was a position held by a young male domestic worker on the staff of a great house, usually a young teenager.

Maid

housemaidchambermaidhousekeeper
A maid, or housemaid or maidservant, is a female domestic worker.

Houseboy

house boyhouseboihousegirl
A houseboy (alternatively spelled houseboi in earlier colonial contexts) is typically a male domestic worker or personal assistant who performs cleaning and personal chores.

Governess

governessesgouvernanteat home
The governess occupied a uniquely awkward position in the Victorian household, because she was neither a servant nor yet a member of the host family.