Don Knotts

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Jesse Donald Knotts (July 21, 1924 – February 24, 2006) was an American actor and comedian, best known for his role as Deputy Sheriff Barney Fife on The Andy Griffith Show, a 1960s sitcom for which he earned five Emmy Awards, and for his role as Ralph Furley on the highly rated sitcom Three's Company from 1979 to 1984.wikipedia
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Barney Fife

Dep. Barney FifeDeputy Barney FifeBarney
Jesse Donald Knotts (July 21, 1924 – February 24, 2006) was an American actor and comedian, best known for his role as Deputy Sheriff Barney Fife on The Andy Griffith Show, a 1960s sitcom for which he earned five Emmy Awards, and for his role as Ralph Furley on the highly rated sitcom Three's Company from 1979 to 1984.
Bernard "Barney" Fife is a fictional character in the American television program The Andy Griffith Show, portrayed by comic actor Don Knotts.

The Ghost and Mr. Chicken

He also starred in multiple comedic films, including playing Luther Heggs in The Ghost and Mr. Chicken (1966) and Henry Limpet in The Incredible Mr. Limpet (1964). Knotts then began his Universal five-film contract with The Ghost and Mr. Chicken (1966), The Reluctant Astronaut (1967), The Shakiest Gun in the West (1968), The Love God? (1969) and How to Frame a Figg (1971).
The Ghost and Mr. Chicken is a 1966 American comedy-drama film starring Don Knotts as Luther Heggs, a newspaper typesetter who spends a night in a haunted house, which is located in the fictitious community of Rachel, Kansas.

The Andy Griffith Show

Andy Griffith ShowAndy Of MayberryAndy Griffith
Jesse Donald Knotts (July 21, 1924 – February 24, 2006) was an American actor and comedian, best known for his role as Deputy Sheriff Barney Fife on The Andy Griffith Show, a 1960s sitcom for which he earned five Emmy Awards, and for his role as Ralph Furley on the highly rated sitcom Three's Company from 1979 to 1984.
Other major characters include Andy's inept but well-meaning cousin and deputy, Barney Fife (Don Knotts); Andy's spinster aunt and housekeeper, Bee Taylor (Frances Bavier), and Andy's precocious young son, Opie (Ron Howard).

The Incredible Mr. Limpet

Mr. Limpet
He also starred in multiple comedic films, including playing Luther Heggs in The Ghost and Mr. Chicken (1966) and Henry Limpet in The Incredible Mr. Limpet (1964). Knotts went on to star in a series of film comedies that drew on his high-strung persona from the television series: he had a cameo appearance in United Artists' It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World (1963), and starred in Warner Bros.' The Incredible Mr. Limpet (1964).
Don Knotts plays the title character.

Three's Company

Three’s Company Come and Knock on Our Door
Jesse Donald Knotts (July 21, 1924 – February 24, 2006) was an American actor and comedian, best known for his role as Deputy Sheriff Barney Fife on The Andy Griffith Show, a 1960s sitcom for which he earned five Emmy Awards, and for his role as Ralph Furley on the highly rated sitcom Three's Company from 1979 to 1984.
After Norman Fell and Audra Lindley left the series in 1979 for their own sitcom, Don Knotts joined the cast as the roommates' new building manager, Ralph Furley.

No Time for Sergeants (film)

No Time for Sergeants1958 film versionfilm
In 1958, Knotts appeared for the first time on film with Andy Griffith in the film version of No Time for Sergeants.
No Time for Sergeants is a 1957 American comedy film directed by Mervyn LeRoy starring Andy Griffith and featuring Myron McCormick, Don Knotts and most of the original Broadway cast.

The Shakiest Gun in the West

Knotts then began his Universal five-film contract with The Ghost and Mr. Chicken (1966), The Reluctant Astronaut (1967), The Shakiest Gun in the West (1968), The Love God? (1969) and How to Frame a Figg (1971).
The Shakiest Gun in the West is a 1968 American comedy-western film starring Don Knotts.

How to Frame a Figg

Knotts then began his Universal five-film contract with The Ghost and Mr. Chicken (1966), The Reluctant Astronaut (1967), The Shakiest Gun in the West (1968), The Love God? (1969) and How to Frame a Figg (1971).
How to Frame a Figg is a 1971 comedy film about a bookkeeper's bungling assistant, Hollis Alexander Figg (played by Don Knotts) in the Dalton city hall, who finds himself framed for embezzlement.

Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy SeriesEmmyPrimetime Emmy Award
Knotts's portrayal of the deputy on the popular show earned him five Emmy Awards for Best Supporting Actor in a Television Comedy, three awards for the first five seasons that he played the character.

Spin-off (media)

spin-offspinoffspin-offs
Knotts reprised his role as Barney Fife several times in the 1960s: he made five guest appearances on The Andy Griffith Show (gaining him another two Emmy Awards), and he later appeared once on the spin-off Mayberry RFD, where he was present as best man for the marriage of Andy Taylor and his longtime love, Helen Crump.

The Reluctant Astronaut

Knotts then began his Universal five-film contract with The Ghost and Mr. Chicken (1966), The Reluctant Astronaut (1967), The Shakiest Gun in the West (1968), The Love God? (1969) and How to Frame a Figg (1971).
The Reluctant Astronaut is a 1967 Universal Pictures feature film produced and directed by Edward Montagne and starring Don Knotts in a story about a carnival ride operator who is hired as a janitor at the Manned Spacecraft Center in Houston and is eventually sent into space.

Steve Allen

AllenThe Steve Allen ShowAllen, Steve
He came to fame in 1956 on Steve Allen's variety show, as part of Allen's repertory company, most notably in Allen's mock "Man in the Street" interviews, always as an extremely nervous man.
The show's regulars were Tom Poston, Louis Nye, Bill Dana, Don Knotts, Pat Harrington, Jr., Dayton Allen, and Gabriel Dell.

Tim Conway

The Tim Conway ShowConway
Beginning in 1975, Knotts was teamed with Tim Conway in a series of slapstick films aimed at children, including the Disney film The Apple Dumpling Gang (1975) and its sequel, The Apple Dumpling Gang Rides Again (1979).
Among his more notable roles, he portrayed the inept Ensign Parker in the 1960s World War II TV situation comedy McHale's Navy, was a regular cast member (1975–78) on the TV comedy The Carol Burnett Show where he portrayed his recurrent iconic characters Mister Tudball, Oldest Man and Dumb Private, co-starred with Don Knotts in several films (1979–80), was the title character in the Dorf series of eight sports comedy direct-to-video films (1987–96), and provided the voice of Barnacle Boy in the animated series SpongeBob SquarePants (1999–2012).

No Time for Sergeants

the original novel
From October 20, 1955 through September 14, 1957, Knotts appeared in the Broadway play version of No Time for Sergeants, in which he played two roles, listed on the playbill as a Corporal Manual Dexterity and a Preacher.
Griffith reprised his role, Myron McCormick played Sgt. King, Roddy McDowell played Will's army buddy Ben, and Don Knotts made his Broadway debut as Corporal Manual Dexterity.

Andy Griffith

AndyAndy GrifterGriffith
In 1958, Knotts appeared for the first time on film with Andy Griffith in the film version of No Time for Sergeants.
Griffith later reprised his role for the film version (1958) of No Time for Sergeants; the film also featured Don Knotts, as a corporal in charge of manual-dexterity tests, marking the beginning of a lifelong association between Griffith and Knotts.

The Love God?

The Love God
Knotts then began his Universal five-film contract with The Ghost and Mr. Chicken (1966), The Reluctant Astronaut (1967), The Shakiest Gun in the West (1968), The Love God? (1969) and How to Frame a Figg (1971).
The Love God? is a 1969 Universal Pictures feature film which starred Don Knotts and Edmond O'Brien.

The Private Eyes (1980 film)

The Private EyesThe Private Eyes'' (1980 film)
They also did two independent films, the boxing comedy The Prize Fighter (1979), and the mystery comedy The Private Eyes (1980).
The Private Eyes is a 1980 American comedy mystery film starring Tim Conway and Don Knotts.

Gus (1976 film)

GusGus'' (1976 film)Gus'' (film)
Knotts co-starred in several other Disney films, including Gus (1976), No Deposit, No Return (1976), Herbie Goes to Monte Carlo (1977) and Hot Lead and Cold Feet (1978).
Gus is a 1976 American family comedy film by Walt Disney Productions, directed by Vincent McEveety and starring Ed Asner, Don Knotts and Gary Grimes.

The Apple Dumpling Gang Rides Again

Beginning in 1975, Knotts was teamed with Tim Conway in a series of slapstick films aimed at children, including the Disney film The Apple Dumpling Gang (1975) and its sequel, The Apple Dumpling Gang Rides Again (1979).
Produced by Walt Disney Productions, it is a sequel to The Apple Dumpling Gang (1975), starring the comedy duo of Tim Conway and Don Knotts reprising their respective roles as Amos and Theodore.

The Prize Fighter

They also did two independent films, the boxing comedy The Prize Fighter (1979), and the mystery comedy The Private Eyes (1980).
The Prize Fighter is an American comedy film starring Tim Conway and Don Knotts.

Alpha Psi Omega

Delta Psi Omega
He was a member of Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity and Alpha Psi Omega Honor Society while at WVU.

John Ritter

his fatherJohn
On set, Knotts easily integrated himself to the already-established cast who were, as John Ritter put it, "so scared" of Knotts because of his star status when he joined the cast.
In 2002, Don Knotts called Ritter the "greatest physical comedian on the planet".

Herbie Goes to Monte Carlo

Knotts co-starred in several other Disney films, including Gus (1976), No Deposit, No Return (1976), Herbie Goes to Monte Carlo (1977) and Hot Lead and Cold Feet (1978).
The film stars Dean Jones as returning champion race car driver Jim Douglas, joined by his somewhat cynical and eccentric riding mechanic Wheely Applegate (Don Knotts).

It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World

It's a Mad Mad Mad Mad WorldIt's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad, WorldIt’s a Mad Mad Mad Mad World
Knotts went on to star in a series of film comedies that drew on his high-strung persona from the television series: he had a cameo appearance in United Artists' It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World (1963), and starred in Warner Bros.' The Incredible Mr. Limpet (1964).
Don Knotts originally shot a second scene in which he tries to use a telephone in a diner.

Hot Lead and Cold Feet

Knotts co-starred in several other Disney films, including Gus (1976), No Deposit, No Return (1976), Herbie Goes to Monte Carlo (1977) and Hot Lead and Cold Feet (1978).
Hot Lead and Cold Feet (originally titled Welcome to Bloodshy) is a 1978 American comedy-western film produced by Walt Disney Productions and starring Jim Dale, Karen Valentine, Don Knotts, Jack Elam and Darren McGavin.