Donald Knuth

Donald E. KnuthKnuthDon KnuthD. E. KnuthDonald Ervin KnuthKnuth, DonaldKnuth, Donald E.Knuth, D.E.D. KnuthDonald E. Knuth, Ph.D.
Donald Ervin Knuth (born January 10, 1938) is an American computer scientist, mathematician, and professor emeritus at Stanford University.wikipedia
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TeX

TeX Users GroupTUGPlain TeX
In addition to fundamental contributions in several branches of theoretical computer science, Knuth is the creator of the TeX computer typesetting system, the related METAFONT font definition language and rendering system, and the Computer Modern family of typefaces.
TeX (, see below), stylized within the system as Te X, is a typesetting system (or a "formatting system") which was designed and mostly written by Donald Knuth and released in 1978.

Literate programming

literate programLiterateliterate script
As a writer and scholar, Knuth created the WEB and CWEB computer programming systems designed to encourage and facilitate literate programming, and designed the MIX/MMIX instruction set architectures.
Literate programming is a programming paradigm introduced by Donald Knuth in which a computer program is given an explanation of its logic in a natural language, such as English, interspersed with snippets of macros and traditional source code, from which compilable source code can be generated.

MIX

MIXAL
As a writer and scholar, Knuth created the WEB and CWEB computer programming systems designed to encourage and facilitate literate programming, and designed the MIX/MMIX instruction set architectures.
MIX is a hypothetical computer used in Donald Knuth's monograph, The Art of Computer Programming (TAOCP).

Computer Modern

Latin ModernCMU familyComputer Modern italic
In addition to fundamental contributions in several branches of theoretical computer science, Knuth is the creator of the TeX computer typesetting system, the related METAFONT font definition language and rendering system, and the Computer Modern family of typefaces.
It was created by Donald Knuth with his Metafont program, and was most recently updated in 1992.

CWEB

As a writer and scholar, Knuth created the WEB and CWEB computer programming systems designed to encourage and facilitate literate programming, and designed the MIX/MMIX instruction set architectures.
CWEB is a computer programming system created by Donald Knuth and Silvio Levy as a follow-up to Knuth's WEB literate programming system, using the C programming language (and to a lesser extent the C++ and Java programming languages) instead of Pascal.

MMIX

As a writer and scholar, Knuth created the WEB and CWEB computer programming systems designed to encourage and facilitate literate programming, and designed the MIX/MMIX instruction set architectures.
MMIX (pronounced em-mix) is a 64-bit reduced instruction set computing (RISC) architecture designed by Donald Knuth, with significant contributions by John L. Hennessy (who contributed to the design of the MIPS architecture) and Richard L. Sites (who was an architect of the Alpha architecture).

WEB

WEAVE
As a writer and scholar, Knuth created the WEB and CWEB computer programming systems designed to encourage and facilitate literate programming, and designed the MIX/MMIX instruction set architectures.
WEB is a computer programming system created by Donald E. Knuth as the first implementation of what he called "literate programming": the idea that one could create software as works of literature, by embedding source code inside descriptive text, rather than the reverse (as is common practice in most programming languages), in an order that is convenient for exposition to human readers, rather than in the order demanded by the compiler.

Concrete Mathematics

Concrete Mathematics: A Foundation for Computer Science
Concrete Mathematics: A Foundation for Computer Science 2nd ed., which originated with an expansion of the mathematical preliminaries section of Volume 1 of TAoCP, has also been published.
Concrete Mathematics: A Foundation for Computer Science, by Ronald Graham, Donald Knuth, and Oren Patashnik, first published in 1989, is a textbook that is widely used in computer-science departments as a substantive but light-hearted treatment of the analysis of algorithms.

Analysis of algorithms

computational complexitycomplexity analysiscomputationally expensive
Knuth has been called the "father of the analysis of algorithms".
The term "analysis of algorithms" was coined by Donald Knuth.

The Art of Computer Programming

Art of Computer ProgrammingTAOCPKnuth
He is the author of the multi-volume work The Art of Computer Programming.
The Art of Computer Programming (TAOCP) is a comprehensive monograph written by computer scientist Donald Knuth that covers many kinds of programming algorithms and their analysis.

Surreal number

surreal numbers(surreal) numbersurcomplex number
Knuth is also the author of Surreal Numbers, a mathematical novelette on John Conway's set theory construction of an alternate system of numbers.
Conway's construction was introduced in Donald Knuth's 1974 book Surreal Numbers: How Two Ex-Students Turned on to Pure Mathematics and Found Total Happiness.

Things a Computer Scientist Rarely Talks About

Subsequently, he was invited to give a set of lectures on his 3:16 project, resulting in another book, Things a Computer Scientist Rarely Talks About, where he published the lectures "God and Computer Science".
Things a Computer Scientist Rarely Talks About (2001) is a book by Donald E. Knuth, published by CSLI Publications of Stanford, California.

Herbert Wilf

Herbert S. WilfHerbert Saul WilfWilf
In 1995, Knuth wrote the foreword to the book A=B by Marko Petkovšek, Herbert Wilf and Doron Zeilberger.
His collaborators include Doron Zeilberger and Donald Knuth.

Metafont

In addition to fundamental contributions in several branches of theoretical computer science, Knuth is the creator of the TeX computer typesetting system, the related METAFONT font definition language and rendering system, and the Computer Modern family of typefaces.
Metafont was devised by Donald Knuth as a companion to his TeX typesetting system.

John Horton Conway

John H. ConwayJohn ConwayConway
Knuth is also the author of Surreal Numbers, a mathematical novelette on John Conway's set theory construction of an alternate system of numbers.
He invented a new system of numbers, the surreal numbers, which are closely related to certain games and have been the subject of a mathematical novelette by Donald Knuth.

Milwaukee Lutheran High School

Milwaukee LutheranLutheran High School
His father had two jobs: running a small printing company and teaching bookkeeping at Milwaukee Lutheran High School.

Hexadecimal

hex0x16
Knuth used to pay a finder's fee of $2.56 for any typographical errors or mistakes discovered in his books, because "256 pennies is one hexadecimal dollar", and $0.32 for "valuable suggestions".
Donald Knuth introduced the use of a particular typeface to represent a particular radix in his book The TeXbook.

Knuth reward check

monetary awardsreward
According to an article in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Technology Review, these Knuth reward checks are "among computerdom's most prized trophies".
Knuth reward checks are checks or check-like certificates awarded by computer scientist Donald Knuth for finding technical, typographical, or historical errors, or making substantial suggestions for his publications.

Pascal (programming language)

PascalPascal programming languageISO 7185
The same WEB source is used to weave a TeX file, and to tangle a Pascal source file.
The typesetting system TeX by Donald E. Knuth was written in WEB, the original literate programming system, based on DEC PDP-10 Pascal.

Grace Murray Hopper Award

ACM Grace Murray Hopper AwardGrace Hopper AwardGrace Murray Hopper Award for Outstanding Young Computer Professionals
In 1971, Knuth was the recipient of the first ACM Grace Murray Hopper Award.

LaTeX

LaTeX2HTMLHlineLaTeX2e
Around the same time, LaTeX, the now-widely-adopted macro package based on TeX, was first developed by Leslie Lamport, who later published its first user manual in 1986.
The characters T, E, X in the name come from the Greek capital letters tau, epsilon, and chi, as the name of TeX derives from the τέχνη (skill, art, technique); for this reason, TeX's creator Donald Knuth promotes a pronunciation of (that is, with a voiceless velar fricative as in Modern Greek, similar to the ch in loch).

California Institute of Technology

CaltechCalifornia Institute of Technology (Caltech)Cal Tech
In 1963, with mathematician Marshall Hall as his adviser, he earned a PhD in mathematics from the California Institute of Technology.
Donald Knuth (PhD 1963), the "father" of the analysis of algorithms, wrote The Art of Computer Programming and created the TeX computer typesetting system, which is commonly used in the scientific community.

Numberphile

See list for moreThe Numberphile Podcast
Knuth has also appeared in a number of Numberphile and Computerphile videos on YouTube where he has discussed topics from writing Surreal Numbers to why he doesn't use email.

Turing Award

ACM Turing AwardA.M. Turing AwardA. M. Turing Award
He is the 1974 recipient of the ACM Turing Award, informally considered the Nobel Prize of computer science.

IBM 650

650Symbolic Optimal Assembly ProgramIBM model 650
While studying physics at the Case Institute of Technology, Knuth was introduced to the IBM 650, one of the early mainframes.
Donald Knuth's series of books The Art of Computer Programming is famously dedicated to a 650.