Donald O. Hebb

Donald HebbDonald Olding HebbHebbD. O. HebbHebbianHebb DOHebb PrizeHebb's lawHebb, Donald Olding
Donald Olding Hebb FRS (July 22, 1904 – August 20, 1985) was a Canadian psychologist who was influential in the area of neuropsychology, where he sought to understand how the function of neurons contributed to psychological processes such as learning.wikipedia
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Hebbian theory

Hebbian learningHebbianHebbian plasticity
He is best known for his theory of Hebbian learning, which he introduced in his classic 1949 work The Organization of Behavior.
It was introduced by Donald Hebb in his 1949 book The Organization of Behavior. The theory is also called Hebb's rule, Hebb's postulate, and cell assembly theory.

Organization of Behavior

The Organization of Behavior
He is best known for his theory of Hebbian learning, which he introduced in his classic 1949 work The Organization of Behavior.
Organization of Behavior is a 1949 book by the psychologist Donald O. Hebb.

Dalhousie University

DalhousieDalhousie CollegeDalhousie Tigers
Those in 9th and 10th grades were permitted to advance despite their failure but there was no 12th grade in Chester.) He entered Dalhousie University aiming to become a novelist.
Other notable graduates of Dalhousie includes Donald O. Hebb, who helped advance the field of neuropsychology, Kathryn D. Sullivan, the first American woman to walk in space and Jeff Dahn, one of the world's foremost researchers in lithium battery chemistry and aging.

McGill University

McGillMcGill CollegeRoyal Institution for the Advancement of Learning
In 1928, he became a graduate student at McGill University.
Sir William Osler, Wilder Penfield, Donald Hebb, Brenda Milner, and others made significant discoveries in medicine, neuroscience and psychology while working at McGill, many at the University's Montreal Neurological Institute.

Quebec

QuébecProvince of QuebecQC
Later, he worked on a farm in Alberta and then traveled around, working as a laborer in Quebec.
William Osler, Wilder Penfield, Donald Hebb, Brenda Milner, and others made significant discoveries in medicine, neuroscience and psychology while working at McGill University in Montreal.

Mortimer Mishkin

Mishkin
Here he once again worked with Penfield, but this time through his students, which included Mortimer Mishkin, Haldor Enger Rosvold, and Brenda Milner, all of whom extended his earlier work with Penfield on the human brain.
Born in Fitchburg, Massachusetts, Mishkin graduated from Dartmouth College in 1946, and took a 1949 M.A. and 1951 Ph.D from McGill University under Donald O. Hebb.

Artificial neural network

artificial neural networksneural networksneural network
While the dominant form of synaptic transmission in the nervous system was later found to be chemical, modern artificial neural networks are still based on the transmission of signals via electrical impulses that Hebbian theory was first designed around.
In the late 1940s, D. O. Hebb created a learning hypothesis based on the mechanism of neural plasticity that became known as Hebbian learning.

Brenda Milner

Brenda Atkinson Milner
Here he once again worked with Penfield, but this time through his students, which included Mortimer Mishkin, Haldor Enger Rosvold, and Brenda Milner, all of whom extended his earlier work with Penfield on the human brain.
In Montreal, she became a Ph.D. candidate in physiological psychology at McGill University, under the direction of Donald Olding Hebb.

Neural network

neural networksnetworksnetwork
He has been described as the father of neuropsychology and neural networks.
In the late 1940s psychologist Donald Hebb created a hypothesis of learning based on the mechanism of neural plasticity that is now known as Hebbian learning.

American Psychological Association

APAAmerican Psychology AssociationAmerican Psychological Association (APA)
Hebb was a member of the American Psychological Association (APA) and was its president in 1960.
Donald O. Hebb, the APA president in 1960 who was awarded the APA Distinguished Scientific Contribution Award in 1961, defended the torture of research subjects, arguing that what was being studied was other nations' methods of brainwashing.

Psychology

psychologicalpsychologistpsychologists
English neuroscientist Charles Sherrington and Canadian psychologist Donald O. Hebb used experimental methods to link psychological phenomena with the structure and function of the brain.

Committee for Skeptical Inquiry

CSICOPCommittee for the Scientific Investigation of Claims of the ParanormalCommittee for Skeptical Inquiry (CSI)
At a meeting of the executive council of the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry (CSI) in Denver, Colorado in April 2011, Hebb was selected for inclusion in CSI's Pantheon of Skeptics.

A/S ratio

Hebb also came up with the A/S ratio, a value that measures the brain complexity of an organism.
It was proposed by Donald Hebb in 1949.

Fellow of the Royal Society

FRSForMemRSFellows of the Royal Society
Donald Olding Hebb FRS (July 22, 1904 – August 20, 1985) was a Canadian psychologist who was influential in the area of neuropsychology, where he sought to understand how the function of neurons contributed to psychological processes such as learning.

Psychologist

psychologistsclinical psychologistresearch psychologist
Donald Olding Hebb FRS (July 22, 1904 – August 20, 1985) was a Canadian psychologist who was influential in the area of neuropsychology, where he sought to understand how the function of neurons contributed to psychological processes such as learning.

Neuropsychology

neuropsychologicalneuropsychologistneuropsychologists
Donald Olding Hebb FRS (July 22, 1904 – August 20, 1985) was a Canadian psychologist who was influential in the area of neuropsychology, where he sought to understand how the function of neurons contributed to psychological processes such as learning.

Neuron

neuronsnerve cellsnerve cell
Donald Olding Hebb FRS (July 22, 1904 – August 20, 1985) was a Canadian psychologist who was influential in the area of neuropsychology, where he sought to understand how the function of neurons contributed to psychological processes such as learning.

Learning

associative learninglearnlearning process
Donald Olding Hebb FRS (July 22, 1904 – August 20, 1985) was a Canadian psychologist who was influential in the area of neuropsychology, where he sought to understand how the function of neurons contributed to psychological processes such as learning.

Review of General Psychology

A Review of General Psychology survey, published in 2002, ranked Hebb as the 19th most cited psychologist of the 20th century.

Chester, Nova Scotia

ChesterChester, NSChester Area Middle School
Donald Hebb was born in Chester, Nova Scotia, the oldest of four children of Arthur M. and M. Clara (Olding) Hebb, and lived there until the age of 16, when his parents moved to Dartmouth, Nova Scotia.

Nova Scotia

NSNova Scotia, CanadaNova Scotian
Donald Hebb was born in Chester, Nova Scotia, the oldest of four children of Arthur M. and M. Clara (Olding) Hebb, and lived there until the age of 16, when his parents moved to Dartmouth, Nova Scotia.

Dartmouth, Nova Scotia

DartmouthDartmouth, NSCity of Dartmouth
Donald Hebb was born in Chester, Nova Scotia, the oldest of four children of Arthur M. and M. Clara (Olding) Hebb, and lived there until the age of 16, when his parents moved to Dartmouth, Nova Scotia.

Maria Montessori

MontessoriDr. Maria MontessoriDr Montessori
Donald's mother was heavily influenced by the ideas of Maria Montessori, and she home-schooled him until the age of 8.

Alberta

Alberta, CanadaABAlberta Transportation
Later, he worked on a farm in Alberta and then traveled around, working as a laborer in Quebec.