Official portrait, 2017
Clinton in 2016
Trump at the New York Military Academy in 1964
Mementos of Hillary Rodham's early life, shown at the William J. Clinton Presidential Center
Trump (far right) and wife Ivana in the receiving line of a state dinner for King Fahd of Saudi Arabia in 1985, with U.S. president Ronald Reagan and First Lady Nancy Reagan
Rodham in Maine South High School's 1965 yearbook
Trump Tower in Midtown Manhattan
Rodham (center) campaigning for Wellesley College Government President in 1968, an election which she later won
Entrance of the Trump Taj Mahal in Atlantic City
Hillary and Bill lived in this house in Little Rock's Hillcrest neighborhood while he was Arkansas Attorney General (1977–1979).
Trump and New Jersey Generals quarterback Doug Flutie at a 1985 press conference in the lobby of Trump Tower
Bill and Hillary Clinton with President Ronald and First Lady Nancy Reagan
Trump's star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame
Clinton in 1992
Trump at a New York Mets baseball game in 2009
Clinton presenting her health care plan, September 1993
Trump and President Bill Clinton in June 2000
Hillary Clinton speaks about the 1993 health care plan at GWU Hospital.
Trump speaking at CPAC 2011
Read Across America Day in Maryland, 1998
Trump campaigning in Arizona, March 2016.
Inauguration Day walk down Pennsylvania Avenue to start Bill's second term as president, January 20, 1997
2016 electoral vote results. Trump won 304–227
Results of the 2000 United States Senate election in New York. Clinton won the counties in blue.
Women's March in Washington on January 21, 2017
Reenactment of Hillary Rodham Clinton's swearing-in as a U.S. senator by Vice President Al Gore in the Old Senate Chamber, as Bill and Chelsea look on
Trump is sworn in as president by Chief Justice John Roberts
Official photo as U.S. senator
Trump speaks to automobile workers in Michigan, March 2017
Clinton listens as the chief of naval operations, Admiral Michael Mullen, responds to a question during his 2007 confirmation hearing with the Senate Armed Services Committee
Trump and group of officials and advisors on the way from White House complex to St. John's Church
Clinton at the 2007 CDA National Convention
Trump examines border wall prototypes in Otay Mesa, California.
Clinton campaigning at Augsburg College in Minneapolis, Minnesota, two days before Super Tuesday, 2008
Trump with the other G7 leaders at the 45th summit in France, 2019
State-by-state popular votes in the Democratic primaries and caucuses, shaded by percentage won: Obama in purple, Clinton in green. (Popular vote winners and delegate winners differed in New Hampshire, Nevada, Missouri, Texas and Guam.)
Trump and Xi Jinping at 2018 G20 Summit.
Clinton speaks on behalf of her former rival, Barack Obama, during the second night of the 2008 Democratic National Convention
Trump, King Salman of Saudi Arabia, and Egyptian president Abdel Fattah el-Sisi at the 2017 Riyadh summit in Saudi Arabia
Official secretary of state portrait, 2009
U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo meeting with Taliban delegation in Qatar in September 2020
Associate Judge Kathryn Oberly of the D.C. Court of Appeals administers the oath of office of secretary of state to Hillary Rodham Clinton as her husband Bill Clinton holds the Bible
Trump meets Kim Jong-un at the Singapore summit, June 2018
Clinton and Obama at the 21st NATO summit, April 2009
Putin and Trump shaking hands at the G20 Osaka summit, June 2019
Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov and Clinton hold a "reset button", March 2009
Trump and his third Supreme Court nominee, Amy Coney Barrett.
Greeting service members at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam, October 2010
Trump conducts a COVID-19 press briefing with members of the White House Coronavirus Task Force on March 15, 2020
The London meeting to discuss NATO military intervention in Libya, March 29, 2011
Poland's president Andrzej Duda visited the White House on June 24, 2020, the first foreign leader to do so since the start of the pandemic.
Clinton with Nobel Peace Prize laureate Aung San Suu Kyi during her December 2011 visit to Myanmar
Trump boards helicopter for COVID-19 treatment on October 2, 2020
Clinton, along with members of the national security team, receive an update on Operation Neptune Spear in the White House Situation Room on May 1, 2011. Everyone in the room is watching a live feed from drones operating over the Osama bin Laden complex.
Trump discharged on October 5, 2020, from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center
Obama and Clinton honor the Benghazi attack victims at the Transfer of Remains Ceremony, held at Andrews Air Force Base on September 14, 2012
Members of House of Representatives vote on two articles of impeachment, December 18, 2019
Clinton addressing email controversy with the media at the UN Headquarters on March 10, 2015
Trump displaying the front page of The Washington Post reporting his acquittal by the Senate
Clinton in September 2014
Trump at a 2020 campaign rally in Arizona
Clinton campaigning for president in Manchester, New Hampshire, in October 2016, with Massachusetts senator Elizabeth Warren (seated)
2020 Electoral College results, Trump lost 232–306
Clinton, accepting Senator Bernie Sanders' endorsement in New Hampshire, July 2016
Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi signing the second impeachment of Trump
Clinton delivering her concession speech
Trump speaks at the "Rally to Protect Our Elections" in Phoenix, Arizona, July 2021.
The Clintons at Donald Trump's inauguration
Trump talking to the press, March 2017
Clinton and her husband attend a wreath laying ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Arlington National Cemetery after the inauguration of Joe Biden
Fact-checkers from The Washington Post, the Toronto Star, and CNN compiled data on "false or misleading claims" (orange background), and "false claims" (violet foreground), respectively.
Copies of What Happened at an event on Clinton's book tour promoting the memoir
2016 presidential campaign logo
Clinton worked at Rose Law Firm for fifteen years. Her professional career and political involvement set the stage for public reaction to her as the first lady.
Clinton in April 2015

A member of the Democratic Party, she was the party's nominee for president in the 2016 presidential election, becoming the first woman to win a presidential nomination by a major U.S. political party; Clinton won the popular vote, but lost the Electoral College vote, thereby losing the election to Donald Trump.

- Hillary Clinton

He won the 2016 United States presidential election as the Republican nominee against Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton but lost the popular vote, becoming the first U.S. president with no prior military or government service.

- Donald Trump
Official portrait, 2017

18 related topics

Alpha

2016 United States presidential election

The 58th quadrennial presidential election, held on Tuesday, November 8, 2016.

The 58th quadrennial presidential election, held on Tuesday, November 8, 2016.

The incumbent in 2016, Barack Obama. His second term expired at noon on January 20, 2017.
Campaign signs of third-party candidates Jill Stein and Gary Johnson, October 2016 in St. Johnsbury, Vermont
map
map
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A general election ballot, listing the presidential and vice presidential candidates
Trump campaigns in Phoenix, Arizona, October 29, 2016
Clinton campaigns in Raleigh, North Carolina, October 22, 2016
President Barack Obama casting his vote early in Chicago on October 7, 2016
Vote margin swing by state 2012 to 2016. Only twelve states (as well as the District of Columbia and Nebraka's 2nd congressional district) shifted more Democratic. The large swing in Utah is mostly due to the votes for third candidate Evan McMullin and the 2012 candidacy of Utah's Mitt Romney.
Final polling averages for the 2016 election by state. Polls from lightly shaded states are older than September 1, 2016.
Results by state, shaded according to winning candidate's percentage of the vote
Results by vote distribution among states. The size of each state's pie chart is proportional to its number of electoral votes.
Results by county. Red denotes counties that went to Trump; blue denotes counties that went to Clinton.
Results by county, shaded according to winning candidate's percentage of the vote
A discontinuous cartogram of the 2016 United States presidential election
A continuous cartogram of the 2016 United States presidential election
A discretized cartogram of the 2016 United States presidential election using squares
A discretized cartogram of the 2016 United States presidential election using hexagons
Results of election by congressional district, shaded by winning candidate's percentage of the vote
County swing from 2012 to 2016
Results by county, shaded according to percentage of the vote for Johnson
Results by county, shaded according to percentage of the vote for Jill Stein
Results by state, shaded according to margin of victory

The Republican ticket of businessman Donald Trump and Indiana governor Mike Pence defeated the Democratic ticket of former secretary of state Hillary Clinton and U.S. senator from Virginia Tim Kaine, in what was considered one of the greatest upsets in American history.

Official portrait, 2021

Joe Biden

American politician who is the 46th and current president of the United States.

American politician who is the 46th and current president of the United States.

Official portrait, 2021
Biden at Archmere Academy in the 1950s
Biden in the Syracuse 1968 yearbook
Results of the 1972 U.S. Senate election in Delaware
Biden and his second wife, Jill, met in 1975 and married in 1977
Biden with President Jimmy Carter, 1979
Biden shaking hands with President Ronald Reagan, 1984
Biden speaking at the signing of the 1994 Crime Bill with President Bill Clinton in 1994
Senator Biden accompanies President Clinton and other officials to Bosnia and Herzegovina, December 1997
Biden addresses the press after meeting with Prime Minister Ayad Allawi in Baghdad in 2004.
Biden at the White House in 1987
Biden campaigns at a house party in Creston, Iowa, July 2007
Biden speaks at the August 23, 2008, vice presidential announcement at the Old State Capitol in Springfield, Illinois
Biden being sworn in as vice president on January 20, 2009
President Obama congratulates Biden for his role in shaping the debt ceiling deal which led to the Budget Control Act of 2011.
Biden during a visit to Baghdad
Biden, Obama and the national security team gathered in the White House Situation Room to monitor the progress of the May 2011 mission to kill Osama bin Laden
Biden and Obama, July 2012
Official vice president portrait, 2013
Biden with Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu in Jerusalem, March 9, 2016
Biden with Vice President-elect Mike Pence on November 10, 2016
Biden with Barack Obama and Donald Trump, at the latter's inauguration on January 20, 2017
Biden at his presidential kickoff rally in Philadelphia, May 2019
Biden takes the oath of office administered by Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. at the Capitol, January 20, 2021
Biden with his Cabinet, July 2021
Biden meeting with Secretary General of NATO Jens Stoltenberg in the Oval Office, June 7, 2021
Biden in a video conference with Vice President Harris and the U.S. National Security team, discussing the Fall of Kabul on August 15, 2021
Percent change from a year earlier
Biden, UK prime minister Boris Johnson and UN secretary-general António Guterres at the opening ceremony of the COP26 climate summit in Glasgow on November 1, 2021
Biden with Ketanji Brown Jackson in the Oval Office
Biden with refugees from Ukraine in Warsaw, March 2022
President Barack Obama and Biden talk with Xi Jinping, February 14, 2012
President Obama presents Biden with the Presidential Medal of Freedom with Distinction, January 12, 2017

Biden and his running mate Kamala Harris defeated incumbent president Donald Trump and vice president Mike Pence in the 2020 presidential election.

Biden had difficulty raising funds, struggled to draw people to his rallies, and failed to gain traction against the high-profile candidacies of Obama and Senator Hillary Clinton.

Democratic Party (United States)

One of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States.

One of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States.

Andrew Jackson was the seventh president of the United States (1829–1837) and the first Democratic president.
Martin Van Buren was the eighth president of the United States (1837–1841) and the second Democratic president.
Senator Stephen A. Douglas
The 1885 inauguration of Grover Cleveland, the only president with non-consecutive terms
Leaders of the Democratic Party during the first half of the 20th century on 14 June 1913: Secretary of State William J. Bryan, Josephus Daniels, President Woodrow Wilson, Breckinridge Long, William Phillips, and Franklin D. Roosevelt
Franklin D. Roosevelt and Harry S. Truman, 32nd and 33rd presidents of the United States (1933–1945; 1945–1953), featured on a campaign poster for the 1944 presidential election
John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson, 35th and 36th presidents of the United States (1961–1963, 1963–1969)
Jimmy Carter, 39th president of the United States (1977–1981), delivering the State of the Union Address in 1979
Bill Clinton, 42nd president of the United States (1993–2001), at The Pentagon in 1998
Barack Obama speaking to College Democrats of America in 2007
President Barack Obama meeting with the Blue Dog Coalition in the State Dining Room of the White House in 2009
Eleanor Roosevelt at the 1956 Democratic National Convention in Chicago
President Barack Obama signing the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act into law at the White House on March 23, 2010
Secretary of State John Kerry addressing delegates at the United Nations before signing the Paris Agreement on April 22, 2016
Shirley Chisholm was the first major-party African American candidate to run nationwide primary campaigns.
President Lyndon B. Johnson signing the Immigration Act of 1965 as Vice President Hubert Humphrey, Senators Edward M. Kennedy and Robert F. Kennedy and others look on
Then-Senator Barack Obama shaking hands with an American soldier in Basra, Iraq in 2008
President Jimmy Carter and Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin in 1978
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu meeting with President Barack Obama at Ben Gurion Airport in 2013
Self-identified Democrats (blue) versus self-identified Republicans (red) (January–June 2010 data)
Higher percentages of Democrats than Republicans are members of union households.
Elected at age 33, Jon Ossoff is currently the youngest member of the U.S. Senate.
Hillary Clinton was the first woman to be nominated for president by a major party.
Secretary of Transportation Pete Buttigieg
Vice President Kamala Harris
Julián Castro served as Secretary of Housing and Urban Development.
U.S. Senator Tammy Duckworth
Secretary of the Interior Deb Haaland
Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi
U.S. Senator Kyrsten Sinema
Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer
U.S. opinion on gun control issues is deeply divided along political lines, as shown in this 2021 survey.

After the 2016 election of Donald Trump, the Democratic Party transitioned into the role of an opposition party and held neither the presidency nor the Senate but won back a majority in the House in the 2018 midterm elections.

Suzan DelBene is the chair of the coalition, and former senator and 2016 Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton was a member while in Congress.

Republican Party (United States)

One of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with its main historic rival, the Democratic Party.

One of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with its main historic rival, the Democratic Party.

Abraham Lincoln, 16th president of the United States (1861–1865) and the first Republican to hold the office
Charles R. Jennison, an anti-slavery militia leader associated with the Jayhawkers from Kansas and an early Republican politician in the region
Ulysses S. Grant, 18th president of the United States (1869–1877)
James G. Blaine, 28th & 31st Secretary of State (1881; 1889–1892)
William McKinley, 25th president of the United States (1897–1901)
Theodore Roosevelt, 26th president of the United States (1901–1909)
Herbert Hoover, 31st president of the United States (1929–1933)
Ronald Reagan, 40th president of the United States (1981–1989)
Donald Trump, 45th president of the United States (2017–2021)
Calvin Coolidge, 30th president of the United States (1923–1929)
Arnold Schwarzenegger, 38th governor of California (2003–2011)
John McCain, United States senator from Arizona (1987–2018)
Donald Rumsfeld, 21st United States Secretary of Defense (2001–2006)
Colin Powell, 65th United States Secretary of State (2001–2005)
Newt Gingrich, 50th Speaker of the House of Representatives (1995–1999)
Annual population growth in the U.S. by county - 2010s
This map shows the vote in the 2020 presidential election by county.
Political Spectrum Libertarian Left    Centrist   Right  Authoritarian
U.S. opinion on gun control issues is deeply divided along political lines, as shown in this 2021 survey.

Its most recent presidential nominee was Donald Trump, who served as the 45th president of the United States from 2017 to 2021.

Trump's defeat of Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton was unexpected, as polls had shown Clinton leading the race.

President of the United States

Head of state and head of government of the United States of America.

Head of state and head of government of the United States of America.

George Washington, the first president of the United States
President Franklin D. Roosevelt delivers a radio address, 1933
President Lyndon B. Johnson signs the 1964 Civil Rights Act as Martin Luther King Jr. and others look on
President Donald Trump delivers his 2018 State of the Union Address, with Vice President Mike Pence and Speaker of the House Paul Ryan
President George H. W. Bush and Russian President Gorbachev sign the 1990 Chemical Weapons Accord in the White House.
Abraham Lincoln, the 16th president of the United States, successfully preserved the Union during the American Civil War.
President Barack Obama with his Supreme Court appointee Justice Sotomayor, 2009
President Ronald Reagan reviews honor guards during a state visit to China, 1984
President Woodrow Wilson throws out the ceremonial first ball on Opening Day, 1916
President Jimmy Carter (left) debates Republican nominee Ronald Reagan on October 28, 1980.
Map of the United States showing the number of electoral votes allocated following the 2010 census to each state and the District of Columbia for the 2012, 2016 and 2020 presidential elections; it also notes that Maine and Nebraska distribute electors by way of the congressional district method. 270 electoral votes are required for a majority out of 538 votes possible.
Franklin D. Roosevelt won a record four presidential elections (1932, 1936, 1940 and 1944), leading to the adoption of a two-term limit.
President William McKinley and his successor, Theodore Roosevelt
President Reagan surrounded by Secret Service
From left: George H. W. Bush, Barack Obama, George W. Bush, Bill Clinton, and Jimmy Carter. Photo taken in the Oval Office on January 7, 2009; Obama formally took office thirteen days later.
Presidents Barack Obama, George W. Bush, Bill Clinton, George H.W. Bush, and Jimmy Carter at the dedication of the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum in Dallas, 2013
White House, the official residence
Camp David, the official retreat
Blair House, the official guest house
The presidential limousine, dubbed "The Beast"
The presidential plane, called Air Force One when the president is on board
Marine One helicopter, when the president is aboard

Presidential elections in the 21st century have reflected this continuing polarization, with no candidate except Obama in 2008 winning by more than five percent of the popular vote and two — George W. Bush and Donald Trump — winning in the Electoral College while losing the popular vote.

Clinton was active politically since his presidential term ended, working with his wife Hillary on her 2008 and 2016 presidential bids and President Obama on his 2012 reelection campaign.

Electoral votes, out of 538, allocated to each state and the District of Columbia for presidential elections to be held in 2024 and 2028, based on representation, which depends on population data from the 2020 census. Every jurisdiction is entitled to at least 3.

United States Electoral College

Group of presidential electors required by the Constitution to form every four years for the sole purpose of appointing the president and vice president.

Group of presidential electors required by the Constitution to form every four years for the sole purpose of appointing the president and vice president.

Electoral votes, out of 538, allocated to each state and the District of Columbia for presidential elections to be held in 2024 and 2028, based on representation, which depends on population data from the 2020 census. Every jurisdiction is entitled to at least 3.
In the 2020 presidential election (held using 2010 census data) Joe Biden received 306 and Donald Trump 232 of the total 538 electoral votes.
In Maine (upper-right) and Nebraska (center), the small circled numbers indicate congressional districts. These are the only two states to use a district method for some of their allocated electors, instead of a complete winner-takes-all.
Cases of certificates of the electoral college votes confirming the results of the 2020 US election, after they had been removed from the House Chambers by congressional staff during the 2021 U.S. Capitol attack.
After the popular election in November, a state's Certificate of Ascertainment officially announces the state's electors for the Electoral College. The appointed Electoral College members later meet in the state capital in December to cast their votes.
Population per electoral vote for each state and Washington, D.C. (2010 census). By 2020 estimates, a single elector could represent more than 700,000 people or under 200,000.
When the state's electors meet in December, they cast their ballots and record their vote on a Certificate of Vote, which is then sent to the U.S. Congress. (From the election of 1876)
This cartogram shows the number of electors from each state for the 2012, 2016 and 2020 presidential elections. Following the 2010 Census, New York and Ohio lost two electoral votes, 8 states lost one, 6 states gained one, Florida gained two, and Texas gained four.
This graphic demonstrates how the winner of the popular vote can still lose in an electoral college system similar to the U.S. Electoral College.
Bar graph of popular votes in presidential elections (through 2020). Black stars mark the five cases where the winner did not have the plurality of the popular vote. Black squares mark the two cases where the electoral vote resulted in a tie, or the winner did not have the majority of electoral votes. An H marks each of two cases where the election was decided by the House; an S marks the one case where the election was finalized by the Supreme Court.
These maps show the amount of attention given to each state by the Bush and Kerry campaigns (combined) during the final five weeks of the 2004 election: each waving hand (purple map) represents a visit from a presidential or vice presidential candidate; each dollar sign (green map) represents one million dollars spent on TV advertising.
Half the U.S. population lives in 143 urban / suburban counties out of 3,143 counties or county equivalents (2019 American Community Survey)

In the 2020 election, there were two objections, and the proceeding was interrupted by an attack on the U.S. Capitol by supporters of outgoing President Donald Trump. Objections to the votes from Arizona and Pennsylvania were each raised by a House member and a Senator, and triggered separate debate in each chamber, but were soundly defeated. A few House members raised objections to the votes from Georgia, Michigan, Nevada, and Wisconsin, but they could not move forward because no Senator joined in those objections.

2016: Clinton received 48.2% of the vote, Trump received 46.1%

Front page for June 10, 2020

The Washington Post

American daily newspaper published in Washington, D.C. It is the most-widely circulated newspaper within the Washington metropolitan area and has a large international audience.

American daily newspaper published in Washington, D.C. It is the most-widely circulated newspaper within the Washington metropolitan area and has a large international audience.

Front page for June 10, 2020
Front page for June 10, 2020
The previous headquarters of The Washington Post on 15th Street NW in Washington, D.C.
The Washington Post building the week after the 1948 Presidential election. The "Crow-Eaters" sign is addressed to Harry Truman, after his surprise re-election.
The Washington Post and Union masthead, April 16, 1878
The Monday, July 21, 1969, edition, with the headline The Eagle Has Landed'Two Men Walk on the Moon"
Demolition of the 15th Street headquarters in April 2016
One Franklin Square, the current home of the Post
Two United States soldiers and one South Vietnamese soldier waterboard a captured North Vietnamese prisoner of war. The publication of the image on the front cover of The Washington Post on 21 January 1968 led to the court-martial of one of the United States soldiers, although The Washington Post described waterboarding as "fairly common".

The Post editorial board endorsed Barack Obama in 2008 and 2012; Hillary Clinton in 2016; and Joe Biden for 2020.

Former President Donald Trump repeatedly railed against the Washington Post on his Twitter account, having "tweeted or retweeted criticism of the paper, tying it to Amazon more than 20 times since his campaign for president" by August 2018.

James Comey

American lawyer who was the 7th director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) from 2013 until his dismissal in May 2017.

American lawyer who was the 7th director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) from 2013 until his dismissal in May 2017.

Comey as a US Attorney
Comey, President Obama, and outgoing FBI Director Robert Mueller at Comey's nomination to become FBI Director, June 21, 2013
Comey at the Oval Office following the San Bernardino attack, December 3, 2015
Obama receives an update from Comey and Homeland Security Advisor Lisa Monaco on the Orlando nightclub shooting, June 12, 2016
Comey at annual FBI and Birmingham Civil Rights Institute conference, May 25, 2016
Comey's October letter

President Donald Trump fired Comey on May 9, 2017.

On July 10, 2015, the FBI opened a criminal investigation into Hillary Clinton's use of a private email server while she was Secretary of State.

Nominees
Trump and Pence

2016 Republican National Convention

Held July 18–21, 2016, at Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio.

Held July 18–21, 2016, at Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio.

Nominees
Trump and Pence
Nominees
Trump and Pence
Quicken Loans Arena, the site of the 2016 Republican National Convention
Protestors against the Obergefell v. Hodges decision, outside the Supreme Court, in June 2015. Conservative views on social issues, especially centering around homosexuality, were adopted by the platform committee, including, but not limited to, an opposition to Obergefell v. Hodges.
"Hard count" of pledged delegates going into the convention:
Melania Trump, wife of Donald Trump, speaking on the first night
Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, the chairman of the convention, spoke on the second night
The theme of Wednesday night was "Make America First Again"
Vice presidential nominee Mike Pence gave a speech on the third night of the convention
The theme of Thursday was "Make America One Again"
Ivanka Trump introducing her father, Donald Trump, immediately before his speech
Trump making a speech on the final day of the RNC, July 2016

On July 19, 2016, the convention formally nominated Donald Trump for president and Indiana Governor Mike Pence for vice president.

Trump and Pence went on to win the general election, defeating the Democratic ticket of Hillary Clinton and Tim Kaine.

The President and White House staff react to the House of Representatives passing the bill on March 21, 2010.

Affordable Care Act

Landmark U.S. federal statute enacted by the 111th United States Congress and signed into law by President Barack Obama on March 23, 2010.

Landmark U.S. federal statute enacted by the 111th United States Congress and signed into law by President Barack Obama on March 23, 2010.

The President and White House staff react to the House of Representatives passing the bill on March 21, 2010.
Jim Clyburn and Nancy Pelosi celebrate after the House passes the amended bill on March 21.
President Obama signs the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act on March 23, 2010.
John Chafee
Mitt Romney's Massachusetts went from 90% of its residents insured to 98%, the highest rate in the nation.
President Obama addressing Congress regarding healthcare reform, September 9, 2009
Tea Party protesters at the Taxpayer March on Washington, September 12, 2009
U.S. health insurance coverage by source in 2016. CBO estimated ACA/Obamacare was responsible for 23 million persons covered via exchanges and Medicaid expansion.
This chart illustrates several aspects of the Affordable Care Act, including number of persons covered, cost before and after subsidies, and public opinion.
Excise taxes percentage 2015
States that expanded Medicaid under ACA had a lower uninsured rate in 2018 at various income levels.
The distributional impact of the Affordable Care Act (ACA or Obamacare) during 2014. ACA raised taxes mainly on the top 1% to fund approximately $600 in benefits on average for the bottom 40% of families.
Coverage rate, employer market cost trends, budgetary impact, and income inequality aspects of the Affordable Care Act
Congressional Democrats celebrate the 6th anniversary of the Affordable Care Act on the steps of the Capitol.
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Tax Cuts and Jobs Act—number of additional persons uninsured

President Donald Trump rescinded the federal tax penalty for violating the individual mandate through the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017, starting in 2019.

As the race narrowed, attention focused on the plans presented by the two leading candidates, Hillary Clinton and the eventual nominee, Barack Obama.