Donald Winnicott

D. W. WinnicottWinnicottD.W. WinnicottDonald W. WinnicottDonald Woods WinnicottWinnicottiansubjective omnipotenceWinnicott, D. W.Winnicott’
Donald Woods Winnicott (7 April 1896 – 25 January 1971) was an English paediatrician and psychoanalyst who was especially influential in the field of object relations theory and developmental psychology.wikipedia
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True self and false self

false selfreal selftrue self
Winnicott is best known for his ideas on the true self and false self, the "good enough" parent, and the transitional object.
The concepts were introduced into psychoanalysis in 1960 by Donald Winnicott.

Object relations theory

object relationsobjectobject relation
Donald Woods Winnicott (7 April 1896 – 25 January 1971) was an English paediatrician and psychoanalyst who was especially influential in the field of object relations theory and developmental psychology.
British psychologists Melanie Klein, Donald Winnicott, Harry Guntrip, Scott Stuart, and others extended object relations theory during the 1940s and 1950s.

Good enough parent

good enough parentinggood enough" parentgood-enough parent
Winnicott is best known for his ideas on the true self and false self, the "good enough" parent, and the transitional object.
Good enough parent is a concept deriving from the work of D. W. Winnicott, in his efforts to provide support for what he called "the sound instincts of normal parents...stable and healthy families".

Psychoanalysis

psychoanalystpsychoanalyticpsychoanalytical
Donald Woods Winnicott (7 April 1896 – 25 January 1971) was an English paediatrician and psychoanalyst who was especially influential in the field of object relations theory and developmental psychology.
In order for an adult to be able to experience "Warm-ETHICS" (warmth, empathy, trust, holding environment (Winnicott), identity, closeness, and stability) in relationships (see Blackman, 101 Defenses: How the Mind Shields Itself, 2001), the teenager must resolve the problems with identity and redevelop self and object constancy.

British Independent Group (psychoanalysis)

Middle GroupIndependent Group Independent Group
He was a leading member of the British Independent Group of the British Psychoanalytical Society, President of the British Psychoanalytical Society twice (1956–1959 and 1965–1968), and a close associate of Marion Milner. Out of the Controversial discussions during World War II, a compromise was established with three more-or-less amicable groups of the psychoanalytic movement: the Freudians, the Kleinians, and the "Middle Group" of the British Psychoanalytical Society (later called the "Independent Group"), to which Winnicott belonged, along with Ronald Fairbairn, Michael Balint, Masud Khan, John Bowlby, Marion Milner, and Margaret Little.
On the one side, were the followers of Melanie Klein, on the other those of Anna Freud, and 'in between, as a kind of buffer zone, were the British group who came to be known as "Independents" – Sylvia Payne, Marjorie Brierley, Ronald Fairbairn and Ella Freeman Sharpe, and eventually Donald Winnicott and Paula Heimann, who moved away from the Kleinian group'.

Comfort object

security blankettransitional objecttransitional objects
Winnicott is best known for his ideas on the true self and false self, the "good enough" parent, and the transitional object.
Donald Woods Winnicott introduced the concepts of "transitional objects" and "transitional experience" in reference to a particular developmental sequence.

Alice Buxton Winnicott

Winnicott completed his medical studies in 1920, and in 1923, the same year as his first marriage to the artist Alice Buxton Winnicott (born Taylor).
In 1923 she married the newly qualified doctor, Donald Winnicott, on 7 July 1923 in St Mary's Church, Frensham.

Masud Khan

Raja Masud Raza Khan
Out of the Controversial discussions during World War II, a compromise was established with three more-or-less amicable groups of the psychoanalytic movement: the Freudians, the Kleinians, and the "Middle Group" of the British Psychoanalytical Society (later called the "Independent Group"), to which Winnicott belonged, along with Ronald Fairbairn, Michael Balint, Masud Khan, John Bowlby, Marion Milner, and Margaret Little.
His training analyst was Donald Winnicott.

British Psychoanalytical Society

British Psycho-Analytical SocietyBritish Psychoanalytic SocietyInstitute of Psychoanalysis
He was a leading member of the British Independent Group of the British Psychoanalytical Society, President of the British Psychoanalytical Society twice (1956–1959 and 1965–1968), and a close associate of Marion Milner. Out of the Controversial discussions during World War II, a compromise was established with three more-or-less amicable groups of the psychoanalytic movement: the Freudians, the Kleinians, and the "Middle Group" of the British Psychoanalytical Society (later called the "Independent Group"), to which Winnicott belonged, along with Ronald Fairbairn, Michael Balint, Masud Khan, John Bowlby, Marion Milner, and Margaret Little.
With the resolution of the controversial discussions, the society became dominated by independent psychoanalysts such as Donald Winnicott, Michael Balint or Wilfred Bion.

Clare Winnicott

Clare Britton
During the war, he met and worked with Clare Britton, a psychiatric social worker who became his colleague in treating children displaced from their homes by wartime evacuation.
Besides publishing some sixteen articles in her own right, she worked with, inspired, married, and edited the writings of D. W. Winnicott.

Joan Riviere

Winnicott's second analysis, beginning in 1936, was with Joan Riviere.
She became a training analyst in 1930 and was the analyst of Susan Isaacs, John Bowlby, and Donald Winnicott and supervised Hanna Segal, Herbert Rosenfeld, and Henri Rey.

Margaret Little

Out of the Controversial discussions during World War II, a compromise was established with three more-or-less amicable groups of the psychoanalytic movement: the Freudians, the Kleinians, and the "Middle Group" of the British Psychoanalytical Society (later called the "Independent Group"), to which Winnicott belonged, along with Ronald Fairbairn, Michael Balint, Masud Khan, John Bowlby, Marion Milner, and Margaret Little.
Little's second analysis was with Ella Freeman Sharpe, and her third with D. W. Winnicott; and it was out of her experiences as analysand that she wrote her seminal article of 1951 on 'Counter-transference and the patient's response to it'.

R. D. Laing

R.D. LaingRonald David LaingLaing
Among contemporaries influenced by Winnicott was R. D. Laing, who wrote to Winnicott in 1958 acknowledging his help.
At this time, he was associated with John Bowlby, D. W. Winnicott and Charles Rycroft.

John Bowlby

BowlbyDr John BowlbyE. J. M. Bowlby
Out of the Controversial discussions during World War II, a compromise was established with three more-or-less amicable groups of the psychoanalytic movement: the Freudians, the Kleinians, and the "Middle Group" of the British Psychoanalytical Society (later called the "Independent Group"), to which Winnicott belonged, along with Ronald Fairbairn, Michael Balint, Masud Khan, John Bowlby, Marion Milner, and Margaret Little.

Controversial discussions

Out of the Controversial discussions during World War II, a compromise was established with three more-or-less amicable groups of the psychoanalytic movement: the Freudians, the Kleinians, and the "Middle Group" of the British Psychoanalytical Society (later called the "Independent Group"), to which Winnicott belonged, along with Ronald Fairbairn, Michael Balint, Masud Khan, John Bowlby, Marion Milner, and Margaret Little.
The "Middle Group", who tried to apply a moderating force included Ella Freeman Sharpe, James Strachey, Sylvia Payne, Donald Winnicott, William Gillespie, Marjorie Brierley, and later, Michael Balint.

Janet Quigley

Winnicott was lecturing after the war and Janet Quigley and Isa Benzie of the BBC asked him to give over sixty talks on the radio between 1943 and 1966.
She contacted Donald Winnicott who had worked with Clare Britton, a psychiatric social worker treating children who had become evacuees.

Omnipotence

omnipotentall-powerfulalmighty
A good-enough parent is well enough attuned and responsive to protect the baby with an illusion of omnipotence, or being all-powerful.
D. W. Winnicott took a more positive view of a belief in early omnipotence, seeing it as essential to the child's well-being; and "good-enough" mothering as essential to enable the child to 'cope with the immense shock of loss of omnipotence' - as opposed to whatever 'prematurely forces it out of its narcissistic universe'.

Introjection

introjectsintrojecting
Winnicott thought that the "False Self" developed through a process of introjection, (a concept developed early on by Freud) in or internalising one's experience of others.

Adam Phillips (psychologist)

Adam PhillipsPhilips, Adam
His influences include D.W. Winnicott, Roland Barthes, Stanley Cavell and W.H. Auden.

Pediatrics

pediatricianpediatricpaediatrics
Donald Woods Winnicott (7 April 1896 – 25 January 1971) was an English paediatrician and psychoanalyst who was especially influential in the field of object relations theory and developmental psychology.

Developmental psychology

developmental psychologistchild psychologychild psychologist
Donald Woods Winnicott (7 April 1896 – 25 January 1971) was an English paediatrician and psychoanalyst who was especially influential in the field of object relations theory and developmental psychology.

Marion Milner

Joanna Field
He was a leading member of the British Independent Group of the British Psychoanalytical Society, President of the British Psychoanalytical Society twice (1956–1959 and 1965–1968), and a close associate of Marion Milner. Out of the Controversial discussions during World War II, a compromise was established with three more-or-less amicable groups of the psychoanalytic movement: the Freudians, the Kleinians, and the "Middle Group" of the British Psychoanalytical Society (later called the "Independent Group"), to which Winnicott belonged, along with Ronald Fairbairn, Michael Balint, Masud Khan, John Bowlby, Marion Milner, and Margaret Little.

Plymouth

Plymouth, EnglandPlymouth, DevonPlymouth City Council
Winnicott was born on 7 April 1896 in Plymouth, Devon, to Elizabeth Martha (Woods) Winnicott and her husband Sir John Frederick Winnicott.

Devon

DevonshireDevon, EnglandCounty of Devon
Winnicott was born on 7 April 1896 in Plymouth, Devon, to Elizabeth Martha (Woods) Winnicott and her husband Sir John Frederick Winnicott.

The Leys School

Leys SchoolThe LeysThe Leys School, Cambridge
He first thought of studying medicine while at The Leys School, a boarding school in Cambridge, after fracturing his clavicle and recording in his diary that he wished he could treat himself.