Doom (1993 video game)

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Doom (typeset as DOOM in official documents and stylized as DooM in other media) is a 1993 first-person shooter (FPS) video game by id Software.wikipedia
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Doom WAD

WADHacx: Twitch 'n KillWADs
In addition to popularizing the first-person shooter genre, it pioneered immersive 3D graphics, networked multiplayer gaming, and support for customized additions and modifications via packaged files in a data archive known as "WADs". The series started to lose mainstream appeal as the technology of the Doom game engine was surpassed in the mid-1990s, although fans have continued making WADs, speedruns, and modifications to the original.
Doom WAD is the default format of package files for the video game Doom and its sequel Doom II: Hell on Earth, that contain sprites, levels, and game data.

Id Software

idid MobileIdeas From the Deep
Doom (typeset as DOOM in official documents and stylized as DooM in other media) is a 1993 first-person shooter (FPS) video game by id Software.
Wolfenstein 3D is often considered as the first true FPS, Doom was a game that popularized the genre and PC gaming in general, and Quake was id's first true 3D FPS.

Doomguy

an unnamed space marine the same characteranonymous
In Doom, players assume the role of an unnamed space marine, who became popularly known as "Doomguy", fighting his way through hordes of invading demons from Hell.
In the finished product, this nearly happens to the Marine in the final level of the first episode, but he continues his adventure.

First-person shooter

first person shooterFPSfirst-person
Doom (typeset as DOOM in official documents and stylized as DooM in other media) is a 1993 first-person shooter (FPS) video game by id Software.
One such title, and the progenitor of the genre's wider mainstream acceptance and popularity was Doom, one of the most influential games in this genre; for some years, the term Doom clone was used to designate this genre due to Dooms influence.

Doom engine

Doom'' engineid Tech 1Doom
The series started to lose mainstream appeal as the technology of the Doom game engine was surpassed in the mid-1990s, although fans have continued making WADs, speedruns, and modifications to the original.
id Tech 1, also known as Doom engine, is the game engine that powers the id Software games Doom and Doom II: Hell on Earth.

Space marine

marinespace marinesMarines
In Doom, players assume the role of an unnamed space marine, who became popularly known as "Doomguy", fighting his way through hordes of invading demons from Hell.
In computer games, playing a space marine in action games was popularized by id Software's Doom series, first published in 1993.

Final Doom

Dario CasaliStefano and Dario
The Doom franchise was later continued with the follow-up Doom II: Hell on Earth (1994) and numerous expansion packs, including Master Levels for Doom II (1995), and Final Doom (1996).
TNT: Evilution features a new soundtrack, while The Plutonia Experiment uses music from Doom and Doom II.

Doom 3

Doom 3: BFG EditionDoom 3 Collector's Edition
The franchise again received popular attention in 2004 with the release of Doom 3, a retelling of the original game using id Tech 4, with an associated 2005 Doom motion picture.
Critics praised the game's graphics and presentation, although reviewers were divided by how close the gameplay was to that of the original Doom, focusing primarily on simply fighting through large numbers of enemy characters.

DWANGO

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Online multiplayer was later made available a year after launch through the DWANGO service.
Launched in, it was originally known for its compatibility with Doom, for which it functioned as a matchmaking service for online multiplayer.

2.5D

pseudo-3Dthree-dimensional3/4 perspective
While the levels are presented in a 3D perspective, the enemies and objects are instead 2D sprites presented from several set viewing angles, a technique sometimes referred to as 2.5D graphics.
Other examples include early first-person shooters like Wolfenstein 3D, Doom, Hexen and Duke Nukem 3D as well as racing games like Carmageddon and Super Mario Kart.

John Carmack

John D. Carmackthose done
Immediately following its release most of the id Software team began work on a set of episodes for the game, titled Spear of Destiny, while id co-founder and lead programmer John Carmack instead focused on technology research for the company's next game.
Carmack was the lead programmer of the id Software video games Commander Keen, Wolfenstein 3D, Doom, Quake, Rage and their sequels.

John Romero

Ideas From the DeepJohn Romero’s
Additionally, the other two co-founders of id, designer John Romero and lead artist Adrian Carmack, wanted to create something in a darker style than the Keen games.
He is best known as a co-founder of id Software and designer for many of their games, including Wolfenstein 3D, Dangerous Dave, Hexen, Doom, Doom II and Quake.

Cyberdemon

After defeating the titanic Cyberdemon, the marine discovers the vanished moon is floating above Hell.
The Cyberdemon is a fictional character in the Doom gaming-franchise by id Software, where it was introduced in the first-person shooter game Doom in 1993.

Video game culture

gamingvideo gaminggaming culture
With one-third of the game (nine levels) distributed as shareware, Doom was played by an estimated 15–20 million people within two years of its release, popularizing both the business model of online distribution and the mode of gameplay, and spawning a gaming subculture.
1993's Doom caused quite a stir, with its detailed 3D graphics and copious amounts of blood and gore.

Tom Hall

the author of the game
They initially considered making another game in the Commander Keen series, as proposed by co-founder and lead designer Tom Hall, but decided that the platforming gameplay of the series was a poor fit for Carmack's fast-paced 3D engines.
He served as creative director and designer there, working upon games such as the Commander Keen series, Wolfenstein 3D, Spear of Destiny, and Doom.

NeXTSTEP

NeXTNeXT DPSNeXTStep 1.0
Development was done on NeXT computers running the NeXTSTEP operating system.
It was also the platform on which Tim Berners-Lee created the first web browser, and on which id Software developed the video game Doom.

Robert Prince (video game composer)

Bobby PrinceRobert PrinceRobert "Bobby" Prince
Like they had for Wolfenstein 3D, id hired Bobby Prince to create the music and sound effects.
Some of his most notable work includes Wolfenstein 3D, Doom, Doom II, Duke Nukem II and Duke Nukem 3D.

Dave Taylor (game programmer)

Dave Taylor
The team also added a third programmer, Dave Taylor.
Taylor worked for id Software between 1993 and 1996, and was during the time involved with the development of Doom and Quake.

Commander Keen

Commander Keen 4Commander Keen 4–6Commander Keen in Goodbye Galaxy!
They initially considered making another game in the Commander Keen series, as proposed by co-founder and lead designer Tom Hall, but decided that the platforming gameplay of the series was a poor fit for Carmack's fast-paced 3D engines.
The final episode was split off during development into a stand-alone retail title, and plans for a third trilogy were cancelled after the success of Wolfenstein 3D (1992) and development focus on 3D first-person shooters such as Doom (1993).

Speedrun

speedrunningspeedrunsdemo
The series started to lose mainstream appeal as the technology of the Doom game engine was surpassed in the mid-1990s, although fans have continued making WADs, speedruns, and modifications to the original.
December 1993 saw the release of id Software's Doom, which allowed players to record demo files of their playthrough.

Video game controversies

controversyvideo game controversyvideo game violence
Its graphic violence, as well as satanic imagery, made Doom the subject of considerable controversy.
The two were allegedly obsessed with the video game Doom.

Mod (video gaming)

modmodsmodding
Gaining the first large mod-making community, Doom affected the culture surrounding first-person shooters, and also the industry.
Doom (1993) was the first game to have a large modding community.

Tim Willits

Several future professional game designers started their careers making Doom WADs as a hobby, among them Tim Willits, who later became the lead designer at id Software.
Willits has stated in numerous interviews that he was inspired to make video games when he downloaded a shareware version of Doom.

Multiplayer video game

multiplayeronline multiplayertwo-player
In addition to popularizing the first-person shooter genre, it pioneered immersive 3D graphics, networked multiplayer gaming, and support for customized additions and modifications via packaged files in a data archive known as "WADs". Online multiplayer was later made available a year after launch through the DWANGO service. In addition to the main single-player game mode, Doom features two multiplayer modes playable over a local network: "cooperative", in which two to four players team up to play through the main game, and "deathmatch", in which two to four players play against each other.
There followed 1993's Doom, whose first network version allowed four simultaneous players.

Deathmatch

team deathmatchfree for allfree-for-all
In addition to the main single-player game mode, Doom features two multiplayer modes playable over a local network: "cooperative", in which two to four players team up to play through the main game, and "deathmatch", in which two to four players play against each other.
The origin of the term deathmatch in the context of video games is disputed, especially as it is not well-defined; for pointers, the term might have been coined by game designer John Romero while he and lead programmer John Carmack were developing the LAN multiplayer mode for the video game Doom.