No Results Found!
1,023 Related Articles

Cambridge, Massachusetts

CambridgeCambridge, MACambridge, Mass.
Founded in 1630, just a few months before the founding of the city of Boston, Dorchester now covers a geographic area approximately equivalent to nearby Cambridge.
Located at the first convenient Charles River crossing west of Boston, Newe Towne was one of a number of towns (including Boston, Dorchester, Watertown, and Weymouth) founded by the 700 original Puritan colonists of the Massachusetts Bay Colony under Governor John Winthrop.

Columbia Point, Boston

Columbia PointHarbor Point
May 30, 1630, Captain Squib of the ship Mary and John entered Boston Harbor and on June 17, 1630, landed a boat with eight men on the Dorchester shore, at what was then a narrow peninsula known as Mattapan or Mattaponnock, and today is known as Columbia Point (more popularly since 1984 as Harbor Point).
Columbia Point, in the Dorchester neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts sits on a peninsula jutting out from the mainland of eastern Dorchester into the bay.

Boston

Boston, MassachusettsBoston, MABoston, United States
Dorchester (colloquially referred to as Dot) is a Boston neighborhood comprising more than 6 mi2 in the City of Boston, Massachusetts, United States.
The city annexed the adjacent towns of South Boston (1804), East Boston (1836), Roxbury (1868), Dorchester (including present-day Mattapan and a portion of South Boston) (1870), Brighton (including present-day Allston) (1874), West Roxbury (including present-day Jamaica Plain and Roslindale) (1874), Charlestown (1874), and Hyde Park (1912).

William Phelps (colonist)

William Phelps
Those aboard the ship who founded the town included William Phelps, Roger Ludlowe, John Mason, John Maverick, Nicholas Upsall, Capt. Roger Fyler, William Gaylord, Henry Wolcott and other men who would become prominent in the founding of a new nation.
1593—July 14, 1672) was a Puritan who emigrated from Crewkerne, England in 1630, one of the founders of both Dorchester, Boston Massachusetts and Windsor, Connecticut, and one of eight selected to lead the first democratic town government in the American colonies in 1637.

Massachusetts Avenue (metropolitan Boston)

Massachusetts AvenueMass AveMassachusetts Ave.
The original settlement founded in 1630 was at what is now the intersection of Columbia Road and Massachusetts Avenue.
The street begins in the Boston neighborhood of Dorchester and runs southeast-northwest through Boston, paralleling Interstate 93 for a short distance and interchanging with the Massachusetts Turnpike (Interstate 90).

Neighborhoods in Boston

neighborhoodneighborhoods of BostonNeighborhood of Boston
Dorchester (colloquially referred to as Dot) is a Boston neighborhood comprising more than 6 mi2 in the City of Boston, Massachusetts, United States.
Dorchester (divided for planning purposes into Mid Dorchester and Dorchester)

Mattapan

Mattapan neighborhood
May 30, 1630, Captain Squib of the ship Mary and John entered Boston Harbor and on June 17, 1630, landed a boat with eight men on the Dorchester shore, at what was then a narrow peninsula known as Mattapan or Mattaponnock, and today is known as Columbia Point (more popularly since 1984 as Harbor Point).
Historically a section of neighboring Dorchester, Mattapan became a part of Boston when Dorchester was annexed in 1870.

Meeting House Hill

John White has been referred to as the unheralded champion of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, because despite his heroic efforts on its behalf, he remained in England and never emigrated to the Colony he championed.) The town that was founded was centered on the First Parish Church of Dorchester, which still exists as the Unitarian-Universalist church on Meeting House Hill and is the oldest religious organization in present-day Boston.
Meeting House Hill is one of the oldest sections of Boston's historic Dorchester neighborhood.

Neponset River

city lineNeponsetNeponset River Estuary
For generations, they made their home along the Neponset River estuary, which was a plentiful source of food due to the freshwater meeting the salt water.
From there, the Neponset meanders generally northeast for about 29 mi to its mouth at Dorchester Bay between Quincy and the Dorchester section of Boston, near the painted gas tank.

Dorchester Avenue (Boston)

Dorchester AvenueC37Dorchester Ave
(Even though Dorchester was annexed over 100 years ago into the city of Boston, this founding is still celebrated every year on Dorchester Day, which includes festivities and a parade down Dorchester Avenue).
Dorchester Avenue (sometimes called Dot Ave) is a street in Boston, Massachusetts, running from downtown south via South Boston and Dorchester to the border with Milton, where it ends.

Dorchester, Dorset

DorchesterDorchester Holy TrinityDorchester, England
Originally, Dorchester was a separate town, founded by Puritans who emigrated in 1630 from Dorchester, Dorset, England to the Massachusetts Bay Colony.
In the 17th century the town was at the centre of Puritan emigration to America, and the local rector, John White, organised the settlement of Dorchester, Massachusetts.

First Parish Church of Dorchester

First ChurchFirst Church in DorchesterFirst Parish Church
John White has been referred to as the unheralded champion of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, because despite his heroic efforts on its behalf, he remained in England and never emigrated to the Colony he championed.) The town that was founded was centered on the First Parish Church of Dorchester, which still exists as the Unitarian-Universalist church on Meeting House Hill and is the oldest religious organization in present-day Boston.
First Parish Dorchester is a Unitarian Universalist church in Dorchester, Massachusetts.

The Mather School

Mather Schoolfirst elementary school
Dorchester is the birthplace of the first public elementary school in America, the Mather School, established in 1639.
It is located in the Dorchester region of Boston, Massachusetts and was named after Richard Mather.

Cutshamekin

The Massachusett leader, Chickatawbut, negotiated with the first settlers, but he died of smallpox in 1633, and his brother, Cutshamekin deeded further land to the settlers.
Cutshamekin (died in 1654) (also spelled Kitchamakin or Cutshumaquin) was a Native American leader, who was a sachem of the Massachusett tribe based along the Neponset River and Great Blue Hill in what is now Dorchester, Massachusetts and Milton, Massachusetts before becoming one of the first leaders of the praying Indian town of Natick, Massachusetts.

Dorchester-Milton Lower Mills Industrial District

Lower MillsDorchester Lower MillsDorchester Mills
They soon after opened America's first chocolate mill and factory in the Lower Mills section of Dorchester.
The Dorchester-Milton Lower Mills Industrial District is a historic district on both sides of the Neponset River in the Dorchester area of Boston and in the town of Milton, Massachusetts.

JFK/UMass station

JFK/UMassColumbiaColumbia station
The station was originally called Crescent Avenue or Crescent Avenue Depot as an Old Colony Railroad station, then called Columbia until December 1, 1982, and then again changed to JFK/UMASS.
It is at the intersection of Columbia Road and Morrissey Boulevard in the Dorchester neighborhood.

Stoughton, Massachusetts

StoughtonStoughton, MAWest Stoughton, Massachusetts
Additional parts of Dorchester were ceded to Quincy (in 1792, 1814, 1819, and 1855) and portions of the original town of Dorchester became the separate towns of Hyde Park (1868 and later annexed to Boston in 1912), Milton (1662), and Stoughton (1726, itself later subdivided).
Stoughton was settled in 1713 and officially incorporated in 1726, from the southwestern portion of the large town of Dorchester.

Richard Callicott (New England colonist)

Richard CallicotRichard CallicottRichard Collicott
In 1634 Israel Stoughton built one of the earliest grist mills in America on the Neponset River, and Richard Callicott founded a trading post nearby.
He settled in Massachusetts in 1631/32 in the area which was then known as Dorchester, Massachusetts and now known as Milton, Massachusetts near where Israel Stoughton built his grist mill in 1634.

Roxbury Conglomerate

Roxbury puddingstonePuddingstoneRoxbury
The American poet Oliver Wendell Holmes, wrote a poem called "The Dorchester Giant" in 1830, and referred to the special kind of stone, "Roxbury puddingstone", also quarried in Dorchester, which was used to build churches in the Boston area, most notably the Central Congregational Church (later called the Church of the Covenant) in Boston's Back Bay neighborhood.
The bedrock formation extends well beyond the limits of Roxbury, underlying part or all of Quincy, Canton, Milton, Dorchester, Dedham, Jamaica Plain, Brighton, Brookline, Newton, Needham, and Dover.

Red Line (MBTA)

Red LineMBTA Red LineRed
It is a Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority rail line station for both the Red Line subway and the Plymouth/Kingston, Middleborough/Lakeville and Greenbush commuter rail lines.
It then crosses over the Longfellow Bridge into downtown Boston, where it connects with the Green Line at Park Street, the Orange Line at Downtown Crossing, the Silver Line at South Station, as well as Amtrak and commuter rail at the South Station surface terminal before passing through South Boston and Dorchester.

Edward Everett Square

The oldest surviving home in the city of Boston, the James Blake House, is located at Edward Everett Square, which is the historic intersection of Columbia Road, Boston Street, and Massachusetts Avenue, a few blocks from the Dorchester Historical Society.
Edward Everett Square, in Dorchester, Boston, is an intersection of Columbia Road, Massachusetts Avenue, East Cottage Street and Boston Street, that was named in 1894 after a former Governor of Massachusetts, Edward Everett.

Roger Ludlow

Those aboard the ship who founded the town included William Phelps, Roger Ludlowe, John Mason, John Maverick, Nicholas Upsall, Capt. Roger Fyler, William Gaylord, Henry Wolcott and other men who would become prominent in the founding of a new nation.
They settled at Dorchester, Massachusetts, where they remained for five years.

Dorchester, South Carolina

Dorchester
In 1695, a party was dispatched to found the town of Dorchester, South Carolina, which lasted barely a half-century before being abandoned.
Situated on the Ashley River about 18 mi from Charleston, it was founded in February 1696 by the followers of Reverend Joseph Lord from Dorchester, Massachusetts, who gave it the same name as the town from which they had emigrated (which was in turn named after the English town Dorchester).

Edward M. Kennedy Institute for the United States Senate

Edward M. Kennedy InstituteKennedy Institute for the United States Senate
On March 30, 2015, the Edward M. Kennedy Institute for the United States Senate was dedicated by President Barack Obama.
The Edward M. Kennedy Institute for the United States Senate (also known as the EMK Institute) is a specialty museum and non-profit educational institution on Columbia Point in the Dorchester neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts, next to the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum on the University of Massachusetts Boston campus.

Quincy, Massachusetts

QuincyQuincy, MAMount Wollaston
Additional parts of Dorchester were ceded to Quincy (in 1792, 1814, 1819, and 1855) and portions of the original town of Dorchester became the separate towns of Hyde Park (1868 and later annexed to Boston in 1912), Milton (1662), and Stoughton (1726, itself later subdivided).
First settled in 1625, Quincy was briefly part of Dorchester and Boston before becoming the north precinct of Braintree in 1640.