A report on Dorsal fin and Fin

Dorsal fin of a shark
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Most fish, like this Prussian carp, have one dorsal fin
Fins are used by aquatic animals, such as this orca, to generate thrust and control the subsequent motion
Sharks typically have two dorsal fins
Caudal fin of a great white shark
The yellowfin tuna also has two dorsal fins
Aquatic animals typically use fins for locomotion
(1) pectoral fins (paired), (2) pelvic fins (paired), (3) dorsal fin, (4) adipose fin, (5) anal fin, (6) caudal (tail) fin
Haddocks have three dorsal fins
Comparison between A) the swimming fin of a lobe-finned fish and B) the walking leg of a tetrapod. Bones considered to correspond with each other have the same color.
Differences of dorsal fins of orcas between male and female
In a parallel but independent evolution, the ancient reptile Ichthyosaurus communis developed fins (or flippers) very similar to fish (or dolphins)
The dorsal fin of a white shark contains dermal fibers that work "like riggings that stabilize a ship's mast", and stiffen dynamically as the shark swims faster to control roll and yaw.<ref>Lingham‐Soliar T (2005) "Dorsal fin in the white shark, Carcharodon carcharias: A dynamic stabilizer for fast swimming" Journal of Morphology, 263 (1): 1–11. {{doi|10.1002/jmor.10207}} pdf{{dead link|date=September 2017 |bot=InternetArchiveBot |fix-attempted=yes }}</ref>
In the 1990s the CIA built a robotic catfish called Charlie to test the feasibility of unmanned underwater vehicles
Large retractable dorsal fin of the Indo-Pacific sailfish
Various species of Ichthyosaurs displaying different types of dorsal fins
Dorsal fin of a perch showing the basals and radials of the pterygiophore that support the dorsal fin.
Closeup of the dorsal fin of a common dragonet

A dorsal fin is a fin located on the back of most marine and freshwater vertebrates within various taxa of the animal kingdom.

- Dorsal fin

As they swim, they use other fins, such as dorsal and anal fins, to achieve stability and refine their maneuvering.

- Fin
Dorsal fin of a shark

2 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Cetacea

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Infraorder of aquatic mammals that includes whales, dolphins, and porpoises.

Infraorder of aquatic mammals that includes whales, dolphins, and porpoises.

Dolphin anatomy
Humpback whale fluke
Biosonar
Bubble net feeding
Killer whale porpoising
Two views of the skeletons of Dorudon atrox, extinct for 40 million years, and Maiacetus inuus, extinct for 47.5 million years, in the swimming position for comparison.
Cetaceans display convergent evolution with fish and aquatic reptiles
Fossil of a Maiacetus (red, beige skull) with fetus (blue, red teeth) shortly before the end of gestation
Whales caught 2010–2014, by country
Dominoes made of baleen
A whale as depicted by Conrad Gesner, 1587, in Historiae animalium
"Destruction of Leviathan" engraving by Gustave Doré, 1865
Silver coin with Tarus riding a dolphin
Constellation Cetus
Depiction of baleen whaling, 1840
Stranded sperm whale engraving, 1598
Sea World show featuring bottlenose dolphins and false killer whales
Ulises the orca, 2009
Dawn Brancheau doing a show four years before the incident
SeaWorld pilot whale with trainers

Almost all have a dorsal fin on their backs that can take on many forms depending on the species.

The fluke is set horizontally on the body, unlike fish, which have vertical tails.

Ray fins on a teleost fish, Hector's lanternfish 
(1) pectoral fins (paired), (2) pelvic fins (paired), (3) dorsal fin,
(4) adipose fin, (5) anal fin, (6) caudal (tail) fin

Fish fin

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Ray fins on a teleost fish, Hector's lanternfish 
(1) pectoral fins (paired), (2) pelvic fins (paired), (3) dorsal fin,
(4) adipose fin, (5) anal fin, (6) caudal (tail) fin
Skeleton of a ray-finned fish
Lobe-finned fishes, like this coelacanth, have fins that are borne on a fleshy, lobelike, scaly stalk extending from the body. Due to the high number of fins it possesses, the coelacanth has high maneuverability and can orient their bodies in almost any direction in the water.
The haddock, a type of cod, is ray-finned. It has three dorsal and two anal fins
Cartilaginous fishes, like this shark, have fins that are elongated and supported with soft and unsegmented rays named ceratotrichia, filaments of elastic protein resembling the horny keratin in hair and feathers
Caudal fin of a grey reef shark
Shark fin
Comparison between A) the swimming fin of a lobe-finned fish and B) the walking leg of a tetrapod. Bones considered to correspond with each other have the same color.
In a parallel but independent evolution, the ancient reptile Ichthyosaurus communis developed fins (or flippers) very similar to fish (or dolphins)
Similar adaptations for fully aquatic lifestyle are found both in dolphins and ichthyosaurs
In the 1990s, the CIA built a robotic catfish called Charlie, designed to collect underwater intelligence undetected

Fins are distinctive anatomical features composed of bony spines or rays protruding from the body of a fish.

"This sea-going reptile with terrestrial ancestors converged so strongly on fishes that it actually evolved a dorsal fin and tail fin for improved aquatic locomotion. These structures are all the more remarkable because they evolved from nothing — the ancestral terrestrial reptile had no hump on its back or blade on its tail to serve as a precursor."