The great saphenous vein and landmarks along its course
The great saphenous vein and its tributaries.
Small saphenous vein and its tributaries. (Small saphenous vein labeled vertically at center.)
Superficial veins draining into the great saphenous and femoral vein.
Dorsum of Foot. Ankle joint. Deep dissection
Cross-section through middle of leg
Superficial veins of lower limb. Superficial dissection. Anterior view.
Dorsum of Foot. Ankle joint. Deep dissection.
Nerves of the dorsum of the foot
Great saphenous vein. Deep dissection. Anterior view.
Illustration depicting veins of the leg including great saphenous vein (anterior view).

The dorsal venous arch of the foot is a superficial vein that connects the small saphenous vein and the great saphenous vein.

- Dorsal venous arch of the foot

The origin of the small saphenous vein, (SSV) is where the dorsal vein from the fifth digit (smallest toe) merges with the dorsal venous arch of the foot, which attaches to the great saphenous vein (GSV).

- Small saphenous vein

The great saphenous vein originates from where the dorsal vein of the big toe (the hallux) merges with the dorsal venous arch of the foot.

- Great saphenous vein

At the ankle, the great saphenous vein receives branches from the sole of the foot through the medial marginal vein; in the lower leg it anastomoses freely with the small saphenous vein, communicates by perforator veins (Cockett perforators) with the anterior and posterior tibial veins and receives many cutaneous veins; near the knee it communicates with the popliteal vein by the Boyd perforator, in the thigh it communicates with the femoral vein by perforator veins (Dodd perforator) and receives numerous tributaries; those from the medial and posterior parts of the thigh frequently unite to form a large accessory saphenous vein which joins the main vein near the sapheno-femoral junction.

- Great saphenous vein
The great saphenous vein and landmarks along its course

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