No Results Found!
253 Related Articles

Augmentation Research Center

AugmentAugmented Human Intellect Research Center
He is best known for his work on founding the field of human–computer interaction, particularly while at his Augmentation Research Center Lab in SRI International, which resulted in creation of the computer mouse, and the development of hypertext, networked computers, and precursors to graphical user interfaces.
SRI International's Augmentation Research Center (ARC) was founded in the 1960s by electrical engineer Douglas Engelbart to develop and experiment with new tools and techniques for collaboration and information processing.

The Mother of All Demos

Mother of All Demos1968 presentationdemonstrates
These were demonstrated at The Mother of All Demos in 1968. Engelbart showcased the chorded keyboard and many more of his and ARC's inventions in 1968 at The Mother of All Demos.
"The Mother of All Demos" is a name retroactively applied to a landmark computer demonstration, given at the Association for Computing Machinery / Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (ACM/IEEE)—Computer Society's Fall Joint Computer Conference in San Francisco, which was presented by Douglas Engelbart on December 9, 1968.

Engelbart's law

Engelbart's law, the observation that the intrinsic rate of human performance is exponential, is named after him.
The law is named after Douglas Engelbart, whose work in augmenting human performance was explicitly based on the realization that although we make use of technology,

SRI International

Stanford Research InstituteSRIStanford Research Institute International
He is best known for his work on founding the field of human–computer interaction, particularly while at his Augmentation Research Center Lab in SRI International, which resulted in creation of the computer mouse, and the development of hypertext, networked computers, and precursors to graphical user interfaces.
Douglas Engelbart, the founder of SRI's Augmentation Research Center (ARC), was the primary force behind the design and development of the multi-user oN-Line System (or NLS), featuring original versions of modern computer-human interface elements including bit-mapped displays, collaboration software, hypertext, and precursors to the graphical user interface such as the computer mouse.

List of Internet pioneers

Internet pioneerBirth of the InternetBirth of the Internet" plaque
Douglas Carl Engelbart (January 30, 1925 – July 2, 2013) was an American engineer and inventor, and an early computer and Internet pioneer.
Elizabeth J. "Jake" Feinler (born 1931) was a staff member of Doug Engelbart's Augmentation Research Center at SRI and PI for the Network Information Center (NIC) for the ARPANET and the Defense Data Network (DDN) from 1972 until 1989.

Hypertext

hypertextualityhypertext markupmetatext
He is best known for his work on founding the field of human–computer interaction, particularly while at his Augmentation Research Center Lab in SRI International, which resulted in creation of the computer mouse, and the development of hypertext, networked computers, and precursors to graphical user interfaces.
Douglas Engelbart independently began working on his NLS system in 1962 at Stanford Research Institute, although delays in obtaining funding, personnel, and equipment meant that its key features were not completed until 1968.

The Doug Engelbart Institute

Bootstrap Alliance/Doug Engelbart Institute
In 1988, Engelbart and his daughter Christina launched the Bootstrap Institute – later known as The Doug Engelbart Institute – to promote his vision, especially at Stanford University; this effort did result in some DARPA funding to modernize the user interface of Augment.
The Doug Engelbart Institute, previously known as The Bootstrap Alliance, is a collaborative organization founded in 1988 by the late Douglas Engelbart and his daughter Christina Engelbart, to research into the enhancement of human ability to solve complex, urgent problems.

Graphical user interface

GUIgraphicalgraphical interface
He is best known for his work on founding the field of human–computer interaction, particularly while at his Augmentation Research Center Lab in SRI International, which resulted in creation of the computer mouse, and the development of hypertext, networked computers, and precursors to graphical user interfaces.
In the late 1960s, researchers at the Stanford Research Institute, led by Douglas Engelbart, developed the On-Line System (NLS), which used text-based hyperlinks manipulated with a then new device: the mouse.

NLS (computer system)

NLSoN-Line SystemAugment
The ARC became the driving force behind the design and development of the oN-Line System (NLS).
Designed by Douglas Engelbart and implemented by researchers at the Augmentation Research Center (ARC) at the Stanford Research Institute (SRI), the NLS system was the first to employ the practical use of hypertext links, the mouse, raster-scan video monitors, information organized by relevance, screen windowing, presentation programs, and other modern computing concepts.

Franklin High School (Portland, Oregon)

Franklin High SchoolBenjamin Franklin High SchoolFranklin
He graduated from Portland's Franklin High School in 1942.
Douglas Engelbart, inventor of the computer mouse

DARPA

ARPADefense Advanced Research Projects AgencyAdvanced Research Projects Agency
This led to funding from DARPA to launch his work.
DARPA also funded the development of the Douglas Engelbart's NLS computer system and The Mother of All Demos; and the Aspen Movie Map, which was probably the first hypermedia system and an important precursor of virtual reality.

Computer mouse

mousemicecomputer mice
He is best known for his work on founding the field of human–computer interaction, particularly while at his Augmentation Research Center Lab in SRI International, which resulted in creation of the computer mouse, and the development of hypertext, networked computers, and precursors to graphical user interfaces. Engelbart applied for a patent in 1967 and received it in 1970, for the wooden shell with two metal wheels (computer mouse – ), which he had developed with Bill English, his lead engineer, sometime before 1965.
Douglas Engelbart of the Stanford Research Institute (now SRI International) has been credited in published books by Thierry Bardini, Paul Ceruzzi, Howard Rheingold, and several others as the inventor of the computer mouse.

Chorded keyboard

Hall Braille Writerchording keyboardChord Keyboard
Engelbart showcased the chorded keyboard and many more of his and ARC's inventions in 1968 at The Mother of All Demos.
Douglas Engelbart introduced the chorded keyset as a computer interface in 1968 at what is often called "The Mother of All Demos".

Personal computer

PCPCspersonal computers
Engelbart saw the future in collaborative, networked, timeshare (client-server) computers, which younger programmers rejected in favor of the personal computer.
In what was later to be called the Mother of All Demos, SRI researcher Douglas Engelbart in 1968 gave a preview of what would become the staples of daily working life in the 21st century: e-mail, hypertext, word processing, video conferencing, and the mouse.

As We May Think

On a small island, in a tiny hut on stilts, he read Vannevar Bush's article "As We May Think", which greatly inspired him.
Doug Engelbart came across the essay shortly after its publication, and keeping the memex in mind, he began work that would eventually result in the invention of the mouse, the word processor, the hyperlink and concepts of new media for which these groundbreaking inventions were merely enabling technologies.

Bill English (computer engineer)

Bill EnglishWilliam English
Engelbart applied for a patent in 1967 and received it in 1970, for the wooden shell with two metal wheels (computer mouse – ), which he had developed with Bill English, his lead engineer, sometime before 1965.
William "Bill" K. English (born 1938) is an American computer engineer who contributed to the development of the computer mouse while working for Douglas Engelbart at SRI International's Augmentation Research Center.

Oregon State University

Oregon StateOregon State CollegeOregon Agricultural College
Midway through his undergraduate years at Oregon State University, near the end of World War II, he was drafted into the United States Navy, serving two years as a radar technician in the Philippines.
Douglas Engelbart, winner National Medal of Technology, known for computer mouse and Mother of all Demos.

Bootstrapping

bootstrapbootstrappedNetwork Bootstrap Program
Engelbart embedded a set of organizing principles in his lab, which he termed "bootstrapping strategy".
The term was also championed by Doug Engelbart to refer to his belief that organizations could better evolve by improving the process they use for improvement (thus obtaining a compounding effect over time).

Collective intelligence

group mindcollectivecollective mind
Engelbart attended the Program for the Future 2010 Conference where hundreds of people convened at The Tech Museum in San Jose and online to engage in dialog about how to pursue his vision to augment collective intelligence.
Writers who have influenced the idea of collective intelligence include Francis Galton, Douglas Hofstadter (1979), Peter Russell (1983), Tom Atlee (1993), Pierre Lévy (1994), Howard Bloom (1995), Francis Heylighen (1995), Douglas Engelbart, Louis Rosenberg, Cliff Joslyn, Ron Dembo, Gottfried Mayer-Kress (2003).

Hewitt Crane

Hew Crane
He worked for Hewitt Crane on magnetic devices and miniaturization of electronics; Engelbart and Crane became close friends.
Douglas Engelbart worked with Crane on magnetic logic devices beginning in 1957, before Engelbart moved on to work on hypermedia and augmenting the human intellect with computers, and before Crane began research on replicating human functions with digital computers.

Vannevar Bush

Bush, Vannevar Bush, VannevarBush
On a small island, in a tiny hut on stilts, he read Vannevar Bush's article "As We May Think", which greatly inspired him.
Shortly after "As We May Think" was originally published, Douglas Engelbart read it, and with Bush's visions in mind, commenced work that would later lead to the invention of the mouse.

Valerie Landau

Valerie
Other books on Engelbart and his laboratory include Bootstrapping: Douglas Engelbart, Coevolution, and the Origins of Personal Computing by Thierry Bardini and The Engelbart Hypothesis: Dialogs with Douglas Engelbart, by Valerie Landau and Eileen Clegg in conversation with Douglas Engelbart.
She has filed two patents along with her colleague and mentor Douglas Engelbart.

University of California, Berkeley

BerkeleyUC BerkeleyUniversity of California
Soon after, Engelbart left Ames to pursue graduate studies at the University of California, Berkeley.
In particular, the Alto used a computer mouse, which had been invented by Doug Engelbart (B.Eng 1952, Ph.D. 1955).

Franklin Institute Awards

Benjamin Franklin MedalJohn Scott MedalHoward N. Potts Medal
Engelbart was awarded The Franklin Institute's Certificate of Merit in 1996 and the Benjamin Franklin Medal in 1999 in Computer and Cognitive Science.

CALDIC

As a graduate student at Berkeley, he assisted in the construction of CALDIC.
Morton oversaw the design and construction with a team comprising electrical engineering graduate and undergraduate students at the university, more than 35 in total, including Doug Engelbart (who later invented the computer mouse) and Al Hoagland (a pioneer of the computer disk industry).