Douglas Hogg, 1st Viscount Hailsham

Lord HailshamDouglas HoggThe Viscount HailshamSir Douglas HoggViscount Hailsham The Right Honourable Douglas Hogg 1st '''Baron Hailsham The Right Honourable Douglas Hogg 1st '''Viscount Hailsham(Viscount Hailsham)Douglas Hogg (1st Viscount Hailsham)Douglas Hogg, 1st Baron Hailsham
Douglas McGarel Hogg, 1st Viscount Hailsham, PC (28 February 1872 – 16 August 1950), was a British lawyer and Conservative politician who twice served as Lord Chancellor, in addition to a number of other Cabinet positions.wikipedia
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Attorney General for England and Wales

Attorney GeneralAttorney-GeneralAttorney-General for England and Wales
Hogg, not yet an MP, was appointed Attorney General.
The rule that no Attorney General may be a cabinet minister is a political convention rather than a law, and for a short time the Attorney General did sit in cabinet, starting with Lord Birkenhead in 1915 and ending with Douglas Hogg in 1928.

Cheam School

CheamCheam grammar schoolCheam Preparatory School
He was educated at Cheam School and Eton College, before spending eight years working for the family firm of sugar merchants, spending time in the West Indies and British Guiana.

Quintin Hogg, Baron Hailsham of St Marylebone

Quintin HoggLord HailshamLord Hailsham of St Marylebone
Besides his own reluctance to accept, he was also aware that a peerage might also inhibit the political ambitions of his elder son, Quintin Hogg, who was already active in student politics at Oxford University—as indeed it did.
Born in London, Hogg was the son of Douglas Hogg, 1st Viscount Hailsham, who was Lord Chancellor under Stanley Baldwin, and grandson of Quintin Hogg, a merchant, philanthropist and educational reformer.

1929 Birthday Honours

1929 King's Birthday Honours1929Birthday Honours
In that year's Birthday Honours (3 June) he was promoted to Viscount Hailsham, of Hailsham in the County of Sussex.

Trade Disputes and Trade Unions Act 1927

Trade Disputes and Trade Union Act 1927Trades Disputes ActTrades Disputes Act 1927
As Attorney-General, Hogg guided the Trade Disputes Act of 1927 through the House of Commons.
The Trade Disputes and Trade Unions Act 1927 (17 and 18 Geo V c 22) was a British Act of Parliament passed in response to the General Strike of 1926, introduced by the Attorney General for England and Wales, Sir Douglas Hogg MP.

Stanley Baldwin

BaldwinStanley Baldwin, 1st Earl Baldwin of BewdleySir Stanley Baldwin
Mooted as a possible successor to Stanley Baldwin as party leader for a time in the very early 1930s, he was widely considered to be one of the leading Conservative politicians of his generation.

St Marylebone (UK Parliament constituency)

St MaryleboneSt. MaryleboneCity of Westminster, St Marylebone
Bonar Law arranged for Hogg to be selected as Conservative candidate for the safe seat of St Marylebone.

Quintin Hogg (merchant)

Quintin HoggQ. HoggQuinton Hogg
Born in London, Hogg was the son of the merchant and philanthropist Quintin Hogg and of Alice Anna Hogg, née Graham (d.

Sir James Hogg, 1st Baronet

James HoggJames Weir HoggSir James Hogg
1918). Both of his grandfathers, Sir James Hogg, 1st Baronet, and William Graham, were Members of Parliament.
Hogg's seventh son Quintin Hogg was a merchant and philanthropist and the father of Douglas Hogg, 1st Viscount Hailsham and Sir Malcolm Hogg, who also served on the Council of India, and grandfather of Quintin Hogg, Baron Hailsham of St Marylebone.

National Government (1931–1935)

National GovernmentNational II2nd National Min.
After the October 1931 elections, with the Cabinet restored to a larger size, he joined the second National Government as Secretary of State for War and Leader of the House of Lords.

Leader of the House of Lords

Deputy Leader of the House of LordsLeaderLeaders of the House of Lords
After the October 1931 elections, with the Cabinet restored to a larger size, he joined the second National Government as Secretary of State for War and Leader of the House of Lords.

Campbell Case

The same was true in the debate on the Campbell Case in October 1924, which brought down MacDonald's government.
A year later, in October 1925, after a number of posters had appeared advocating formation of soldiers' and sailors' committees and denouncing the use of troops against workers and further articles in issues of the Workers' Weekly dated 7 and 14 August 1925, the calls of the party for members of the military to resist orders ("If you must shoot, don't shoot the workers") caused the new Attorney General, Douglas Hogg, with the overt encouragement of the Home Secretary, William Joynson Hicks, to authorise a fresh prosecution under the Incitement to Mutiny Act.

Carlton Club

Carltonthe CarltonJunior Carlton
On 14 October 1940, Hailsham was having dinner at the Carlton Club with his son Quintin, who was about to depart for active service as an army officer in North Africa.
The club suffered a direct hit during the Blitz on 14 October 1940, Observers, including the diarist Harold Nicolson, noted Quintin Hogg (then a young Conservative MP, later the 2nd Viscount Hailsham) carrying his elderly, disabled father Lord Hailsham from the building like Aeneas carrying his father Anchises from the Sack of Troy; they had been dining together prior to the former's departure for active service in North Africa.

F. E. Smith, 1st Earl of Birkenhead

Lord BirkenheadF. E. SmithF.E. Smith
Chamberlain agreed, and felt that Churchill and his friend Lord Birkenhead were more likely to agree to serve in a future Hogg government than under Chamberlain (both Hogg and Chamberlain protested unconvincingly to one another that they did not particularly want to be Prime Minister).
According to Neville Chamberlain’s diary (28 March 1928), this was because “he might be seen drunk in the street” (Lord Hailsham was appointed instead).

Secretary of State for War

War SecretarySecretaries of State for WarWar Minister
After the October 1931 elections, with the Cabinet restored to a larger size, he joined the second National Government as Secretary of State for War and Leader of the House of Lords.

Edward Russell, 26th Baron de Clifford

Edward Southwell RussellLord de CliffordThe 26th Baron de Clifford
In December 1935 Hailsham had to preside over the last trial of a peer ‘by his peers’, when he was appointed Lord High Steward to conduct the trial of the 26th Baron de Clifford in the House of Lords for manslaughter.
The trial commenced on 12 December, with the Lord Chancellor, Lord Hailsham, presiding, in the capacity of Lord High Steward appointed by the Crown for the occasion.

Lord President of the Council

Lord PresidentThe Lord President of the CouncilLord President of the Privy Council
He initially continued as Lord Chancellor under Baldwin's successor Neville Chamberlain from May 1937, but in March 1938 he transferred to the sinecure post of Lord President of the Council.

Edward Marjoribanks (Conservative politician)

Edward Marjoribanks
One of these was Edward Marjoribanks (born 1900), who became a Conservative MP in 1929 but committed suicide in 1932.
He died in office on 2 April 1932, committing suicide by shooting himself in the chest while in the billiard room of his stepfather, Lord Hailsham's house in Sussex.

John Sankey, 1st Viscount Sankey

Lord SankeyViscount SankeyJohn Sankey
Hailsham's previous job was not available, as the Labour Lord Chancellor Lord Sankey had joined the National Government; Hailsham was therefore offered, and refused, the sinecure post of Lord Privy Seal.

Patrick Hastings

Sir Patrick HastingsCampbell Casepublic inquiry
Patrick Hastings and Hubert Wallington represented Gruban, while Booth was represented by Rigby Swift KC and Douglas Hogg.

Frederic Maugham, 1st Viscount Maugham

Lord MaughamViscount MaughamFrederic Maugham
He was offered the role because there were very few obvious available choices amongst the ranks of parliamentary supporters of the National Government to replace the ailing Lord Hailsham—for the obvious successor, Sir Thomas Inskip, could not be moved from the position of Minister for Coordination of Defence.

Lord High Steward

High StewardLord High Steward of EnglandStewardship
In December 1935 Hailsham had to preside over the last trial of a peer ‘by his peers’, when he was appointed Lord High Steward to conduct the trial of the 26th Baron de Clifford in the House of Lords for manslaughter.