Downtown

downtown areadown towncentral citycommercial areacentercentral activities districtcentral business areacentral business districtcentral business districtscentral cities
Downtown is a term primarily used in North America by English-speakers to refer to a city's commercial, cultural and often the historical, political and geographic heart, and is often synonymous with its central business district (CBD).wikipedia
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Central business district

CBDbusiness districtcity centre
Downtown is a term primarily used in North America by English-speakers to refer to a city's commercial, cultural and often the historical, political and geographic heart, and is often synonymous with its central business district (CBD).
Geographically, it often coincides with the "city centre" or "downtown", but the two concepts are separate: many cities have a central business district located away from its commercial or cultural city centre or downtown, or even several CBDs at once.

City centre

City Centerurban corecentre
In British English, the term "city centre" is most often used instead.
In the United States, the term "downtown" is generally used, though a few cities, like Philadelphia, use the term "Center City".

Edge city

edge citiesedge-cityoutlying cities
By the 1990s, many office-oriented businesses began to abandon the tired old downtowns for the suburbs, resulting in what are now known as "edge cities".
"Edge city" is a term that originated in the United States for a concentration of business, shopping, and entertainment outside a traditional downtown or central business district, in what had previously been a suburban residential or rural area.

New Orleans Central Business District

Central Business Districtdowntown New OrleansCBD
New Orleans uses the term Central Business District (or CBD) for their downtown due to the historical French Quarter district taking up what would usually be considered the city's historical downtown district, and another area of the city south of the CBD being referred to as "downtown".
It is the equivalent of what many cities call their downtown, although in New Orleans "downtown" or "down town" was historically used to mean all portions of the city downriver from Canal Street (in the direction of flow of the Mississippi River).

Chicago Loop

Loopdowntown ChicagoThe Loop
And in many cases, the downtown area or central business district, itself began to grow, such as in Manhattan where the business district lower Manhattan and the newer one in midtown began to grow towards each other, or in Chicago, where downtown expanded from the Loop across the Chicago River to Michigan Avenue.
The Loop, one of Chicago's 77 designated community areas, is the central business district in the downtown area of the city.

Suburb

Suburbansuburbssuburbia
This has been attributed to reasons such as slum clearance, construction of the Interstate Highway System, and white flight from urban cores to rapidly expanding suburbs.
Nearly all major city downtowns (such as Downtown Miami, Downtown Detroit, Downtown Philadelphia, Downtown Roanoke, or Downtown Los Angeles) are experiencing a renewal, with large population growth, residential apartment construction, and increased social, cultural, and infrastructural investments, as have suburban neighborhoods close to city centers.

Downtown Brooklyn

downtownBrooklynCivic Center
The other boroughs are wider, and "downtown" there refers to Lower Manhattan, Downtown Brooklyn, or some more local business district.
Downtown Brooklyn is the civic and commercial downtown center of the former City of Brooklyn, which, as of 2010, has 2.6 million residents.

Greater Downtown Miami

Downtown MiamiDowntownGreater Downtown
As of 2009, there are approximately 71,000 year-round residents in Greater Downtown (including Downtown's Brickell, Park West, and Arts & Entertainment District neighborhoods), with close to 200,000 populating the Downtown area during the daytime, making Downtown Miami one of the most populous downtowns in the U.S. after New York City and Chicago.

Downtown New Orleans

downtownDowntown Development District in New Orleansdowntown" or "down town
New Orleans uses the term Central Business District (or CBD) for their downtown due to the historical French Quarter district taking up what would usually be considered the city's historical downtown district, and another area of the city south of the CBD being referred to as "downtown".
Contrary to the common usage of the term downtown in other cities, this historic application of the term excluded the New Orleans Central Business District.

Inner city

inner-cityinner citiescity centers
The term inner city has been used, especially in the US, as a euphemism for lower-income residential districts in the downtown or city centre.

Concentric zone model

Burgess modelconcentric ringsconcentric zone theory
The model is more detailed than the traditional down-mid-uptown divide by which downtown is the CBD, uptown the affluent residential outer ring, and midtown in between.

North America

NorthNorth AmericanNA
Downtown is a term primarily used in North America by English-speakers to refer to a city's commercial, cultural and often the historical, political and geographic heart, and is often synonymous with its central business district (CBD).

English language

EnglishEnglish-languageen
Downtown is a term primarily used in North America by English-speakers to refer to a city's commercial, cultural and often the historical, political and geographic heart, and is often synonymous with its central business district (CBD).

British English

BritishEnglishUK
In British English, the term "city centre" is most often used instead.

Oxford English Dictionary

OEDOxford DictionaryThe Oxford English Dictionary
The Oxford English Dictionary's first citation for "down town" or "downtown" dates to 1770, in reference to the center of Boston.

Boston

Boston, MassachusettsBoston, MABoston, United States
The Oxford English Dictionary's first citation for "down town" or "downtown" dates to 1770, in reference to the center of Boston.

New York City

New YorkNew York, New YorkNew York City, New York
Some have posited that the term "downtown" was coined in New York City, where it was in use by the 1830s to refer to the original town at the southern tip of the island of Manhattan.

Manhattan

Manhattan, New YorkManhattan, New York CityNew York
Some have posited that the term "downtown" was coined in New York City, where it was in use by the 1830s to refer to the original town at the southern tip of the island of Manhattan.

North

NNordNorth Korea
As the town of New York grew into a city, the only direction it could grow on the island was toward the north, proceeding upriver from the original settlement, the "up" and "down" terminology coming from the customary map design in which up was north and down was south.

South

Ssouthboundaustral
As the town of New York grew into a city, the only direction it could grow on the island was toward the north, proceeding upriver from the original settlement, the "up" and "down" terminology coming from the customary map design in which up was north and down was south.

Upper Manhattan

Uptown ManhattanuptownUptown, Manhattan
Thus, anything north of the original town became known as "uptown" (Upper Manhattan), and was generally a residential area, while the original town – which was also New York's only major center of business at the time – became known as "downtown" (Lower Manhattan).

Lower Manhattan

Downtown ManhattanLowerdowntown
Thus, anything north of the original town became known as "uptown" (Upper Manhattan), and was generally a residential area, while the original town – which was also New York's only major center of business at the time – became known as "downtown" (Lower Manhattan).

United States

AmericanU.S.USA
During the late 19th century, the term was gradually adopted by cities across the United States and Canada to refer to the historical core of the city, which was most often the same as the commercial heart of the city.

Canada

CanadianCANCanadians
During the late 19th century, the term was gradually adopted by cities across the United States and Canada to refer to the historical core of the city, which was most often the same as the commercial heart of the city.