Draco (constellation)

DracoDraco constellationDragoneconstellation DracoDraDraconisDragonconstellation of Draco the DragonCrocodile constellationDraco Nebula
Draco is a constellation in the far northern sky.wikipedia
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Thuban

Alpha Draconisα DraconisAdib
Thuban (α Draconis) was the northern pole star from 3942 BC, when it moved farther north than Theta Boötis, until 1793 BC.
Thuban, designation Alpha Draconis (α Draconis, abbreviated Alpha Dra, α Dra), is a star (or star system) in the constellation of Draco.

Gamma Draconis

Eltaninγ DraEtamin
The brighter of the three, and the brightest star in Draco, is Gamma Draconis, traditionally called Etamin or Eltanin.
Gamma Draconis (γ Draconis, abbreviated Gamma Dra, γ Dra), formally named Eltanin, is a star in the northern constellation of Draco.

Eta Draconis

η Draη Draconis14/η Dra
Eta Draconis (the proper name is Athebyne ) is a double star with a yellow-hued primary of magnitude 2.8 and a white-hued secondary of magnitude 8.2 located south of the primary.
Eta Draconis (η Draconis, abbreviated Eta Dra, η Dra) is a binary star in the northern circumpolar constellation of Draco.

Beta Draconis

β Draβ DraconisRastaban
Nearby Beta Draconis, traditionally called Rastaban, is a yellow giant star of magnitude 2.8, 362 light-years from Earth.
Beta Draconis (β Draconis, abbreviated Beta Dra, β Dra) is a binary star and the third-brightest star in the northern circumpolar constellation of Draco.

Mu Draconis

μ Dra21/μ Draμ Dra (Alrakis)
Mu Draconis, traditionally called Alrakis, is a binary star with two white components.
Mu Draconis (μ Draconis, abbreviated Mu Dra, μ Dra) is a multiple star system near the head of the constellation of Draco.

Nu Draconis

ν 2 Draν Draconisν Dra
Nu Draconis is a similar binary star with two white components, 100 light-years from Earth.
Nu Draconis (also known as ν Dra, ν Draconis, or traditionally as Kuma ) is a double star in the constellation Draco.

Pole star

polar starNorth StarSouth Star
Thuban (α Draconis) was the northern pole star from 3942 BC, when it moved farther north than Theta Boötis, until 1793 BC.
In 3000 BC, the faint star Thuban in the constellation Draco was the North Star, aligning within 0.1° distance from the celestial pole, the closest of any of the visible pole stars.

Kepler-10

Kepler-10dKOI 72
The constellation contains the star recently named Kepler-10, which has been confirmed to be orbited by Kepler-10b, the smallest rocky Earth-sized planet yet detected outside of the Solar System.
Kepler-10, formerly known as KOI-72, is a Sun-like star in the constellation of Draco that lies 187 parsecs (608 light years) from Earth.

Omicron Draconis

ο Draο Draconis
Omicron Draconis is a double star divisible in small telescopes.
Omicron Draconis (Latinised as ο Draconis, abbreviated to ο Dra) is a giant star in the constellation Draco located 322.93 light years from the Earth.

Cat's Eye Nebula

Cat’s Eye Nebula C6NGC 6543
One of deep-sky objects in Draco is the Cat's Eye Nebula (NGC 6543), a planetary nebula approximately 3,000 light-years away that was discovered by English astronomer William Herschel in 1786.
The Cat's Eye Nebula or NGC 6543, is a relatively bright planetary nebula in the northern constellation of Draco, discovered by William Herschel on February 15, 1786.

39 Draconis

39 Drab Dra
39 Draconis is a triple star 188 light-years from Earth, divisible in small amateur telescopes.
39 Draconis is a wide binary star system in the northern circumpolar constellation of Draco.

Kepler-10b

bKepler 10b
The constellation contains the star recently named Kepler-10, which has been confirmed to be orbited by Kepler-10b, the smallest rocky Earth-sized planet yet detected outside of the Solar System.
Kepler-10, the star that hosts Kepler-10b, is located 560 light-years from our solar system in the Draco constellation.

NGC 5866

5866
There are several faint galaxies in Draco, one of which is the lenticular galaxy NGC 5866 (sometimes considered to be Messier Object 102) that bears its name to a small group that also includes the spiral galaxies NGC 5879 and NGC 5907.
NGC 5866 (also called the Spindle Galaxy or Messier 102) is a relatively bright lenticular or spiral galaxy in the constellation Draco.

NGC 5866 Group

groupLGG 396NGC 5907 Group
There are several faint galaxies in Draco, one of which is the lenticular galaxy NGC 5866 (sometimes considered to be Messier Object 102) that bears its name to a small group that also includes the spiral galaxies NGC 5879 and NGC 5907.
The NGC 5866 Group is a small group of galaxies located in the constellation Draco.

Constellation

constellationsEuropean constellationModern constellation
Draco is a constellation in the far northern sky.
The northern constellation Quadrans Muralis survived into the 19th century (when its name was attached to the Quadrantid meteor shower), but is now divided between Boötes and Draco.

Axial precession

precession of the equinoxesprecessionprecession of equinoxes
Due to the effects of precession, it will again be the pole star around the year AD 21000.
On the other hand, Thuban in the constellation Draco, which was the pole star in 3000 BC, is much less conspicuous at magnitude 3.67 (one-fifth as bright as Polaris); today it is invisible in light-polluted urban skies.

Dragon

dragonsdraconicdragon-like
Its name is Latin for dragon.
undefined 120 BC) listed the constellation Draco ("the dragon") as one of forty-six constellations.

NGC 5879

5879
There are several faint galaxies in Draco, one of which is the lenticular galaxy NGC 5866 (sometimes considered to be Messier Object 102) that bears its name to a small group that also includes the spiral galaxies NGC 5879 and NGC 5907.
NGC 5879 is a spiral galaxy in the constellation Draco.

Draco Dwarf

DracoDraco (dwarf galaxy)Draco Dwarf Galaxy
Another is the Draco Dwarf Galaxy, one of the least luminous galaxies with an absolute magnitude of −8.6 and a diameter of only about 3,500 light years, discovered by Albert G. Wilson of Lowell Observatory in 1954.
The Draco Dwarf is situated in the direction of the Draco Constellation at 34.6° above the galactic plane.

Psi Draconis

ψ Dra31/ψ DraDziban
Psi Draconis (the proper name is Dziban ) is a binary star divisible in binoculars and small amateur telescopes, 72 light-years from Earth.

Orbital pole

ecliptic polenorth ecliptic poleecliptic north pole
It is located 9.6 arcminutes away from the north ecliptic pole to the west-northwest.

Abell 2218

2218
One such massive cluster is Abell 2218, located at a distance of 3 billion light-years (redshift 0.171).
Abell 2218 is a cluster of galaxies about 2 billion light-years away in the constellation Draco.

PGC 39058

Another dwarf galaxy found in this constellation is PGC 39058.
PGC 39058 is a dwarf galaxy located 14 million light-years away in the constellation Draco.

Hercules (constellation)

HerculesErcoleHercules constellation
The constellation of Hercules is depicted near Draco.
Hercules is bordered by Draco to the north; Boötes, Corona Borealis, and Serpens Caput to the east; Ophiuchus to the south; Aquila to the southwest; and Sagitta, Vulpecula, and Lyra to the west.

Hercules–Corona Borealis Great Wall

Hercules-Corona Borealis Great WallHer–CrB GWNQ2-NQ4 GRB overdensity
The Hercules–Corona Borealis Great Wall, possibly the largest known structure in the universe, covers a part of the southern region of Draco.
Thus, it lies in the Northern Hemisphere, centered on the border of the constellations Draco and Hercules.