Draco (lawgiver)

DracodraconianDraconCouncil of the Four HundredDr'''a'''conianDraconian lawDraconian legislation
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Ancient Greece

Greekancient Greekancient Greeks
Draco (, Drakōn; fl. c. 7th century BC), also called Drako or Drakon, was the first recorded legislator of Athens in Ancient Greece.
The Archon (chief magistrate) Draco made severe reforms to the law code in 621 BC (hence "draconian"), but these failed to quell the conflict.

Draconian constitution

constitution of AthensDraconian codeDraconian law code
The laws (θεσμοί - thesmoi) that he laid were the first written constitution of Athens.
The Draconian constitution, or Draco's code, was a written law code created by Draco near the end of the 7th century BC in response to the unjust interpretation and modification of oral law by Athenian aristocrats.

Capital punishment

death penaltyexecutionexecuted
The death penalty was the punishment for even minor offences, such as stealing a cabbage.
A further example comes from Ancient Greece, where the Athenian legal system replacing customary oral law was first written down by Draco in about 621 BC: the death penalty was applied for a particularly wide range of crimes, though Solon later repealed Draco's code and published new laws, retaining capital punishment only for intentional homicide, and only with victim's family permission.

Homicide

homicideshomicide detectivehomicidal
All his laws were repealed by Solon in the early 6th century BC, with the exception of the homicide law.

Manslaughter

involuntary manslaughterintoxication manslaughterinvoluntary homicide
The distinction between murder and manslaughter is sometimes said to have first been made by the ancient Athenian lawmaker Draco in the 7th century BC.

Athenian democracy

democracydemocraticAthens
Draco introduced the lot-chosen Council of Four Hundred, distinct from the Areopagus, which evolved in later constitutions to play a large role in Athenian democracy.
In 621 BC, Draco replaced the prevailing system of oral law by a written code to be enforced only by a court of law.

Solon

Solon of AthensSolonianSólon
All his laws were repealed by Solon in the early 6th century BC, with the exception of the homicide law.
Originally the axones recorded laws enacted by Draco in the late 7th Century (traditionally 621 BC).

Ancient Greek law

ancient Greeklawsole lawgiver
We know little about Draco and the code, with the homicide law being the only one known due to it surviving the Solonian reforms.

Legislator

representativelawmakerlegislators
Draco (, Drakōn; fl. c. 7th century BC), also called Drako or Drakon, was the first recorded legislator of Athens in Ancient Greece.

Athens

Athens, GreeceAthenianAthenians
Draco (, Drakōn; fl. c. 7th century BC), also called Drako or Drakon, was the first recorded legislator of Athens in Ancient Greece.

Oral law

oral traditionits traditionJewish oral law
He replaced the prevailing system of oral law and blood feud by a written code to be enforced only by a court of law.

Feud

vendettablood feudvendettas
He replaced the prevailing system of oral law and blood feud by a written code to be enforced only by a court of law.

Code of law

legal codecodelaw code
He replaced the prevailing system of oral law and blood feud by a written code to be enforced only by a court of law.

Court

court of lawcourtscourts of law
He replaced the prevailing system of oral law and blood feud by a written code to be enforced only by a court of law.

History of citizenship

Athenian citizencitizenship
Draco was the first democratic legislator, requested by the Athenian citizens to be a lawgiver for the city-state, but the citizens were fully unaware that Draco would establish laws characterized by their harshness.

City-state

city statecity-statescity states
Draco was the first democratic legislator, requested by the Athenian citizens to be a lawgiver for the city-state, but the citizens were fully unaware that Draco would establish laws characterized by their harshness.

Greek language

GreekAncient GreekModern Greek
Since the 19th century, the adjective draconian (Greek: δρακόντειος drakónteios) refers to similarly unforgiving rules or laws, in Greek, English and other European languages.

English language

EnglishEnglish-languageen
Since the 19th century, the adjective draconian (Greek: δρακόντειος drakónteios) refers to similarly unforgiving rules or laws, in Greek, English and other European languages.

Olympiad

Cultural OlympiadOlympiadsfour years
During the 39th Olympiad, in 622 or 621 BC, Draco established the legal code with which he is identified.

Attica

AtticAttikiAttika
He may have belonged to the Greek nobility of Attica, with which the 10th-century Suda text records him as contemporaneous, prior to the period of the Seven Sages of Greece.

Suda

SuidasSoudaSuida
He may have belonged to the Greek nobility of Attica, with which the 10th-century Suda text records him as contemporaneous, prior to the period of the Seven Sages of Greece.

Seven Sages of Greece

Seven Sagesseven wise menSeven Wise Men of Greece
He may have belonged to the Greek nobility of Attica, with which the 10th-century Suda text records him as contemporaneous, prior to the period of the Seven Sages of Greece.

Folklore

folk talefolktalefolk
It also relates a folkloric story of his death in the Aeginetan theatre.