Dracula

novelCarfax AbbeyCount Draculanovel of the same name1897 novelBram Stoker novelBram Stoker's DraculabookBram Stoker's Dracula: The Graphic Novelclassic novel
Dracula is an 1897 Gothic horror novel by Irish author Bram Stoker.wikipedia
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Bram Stoker

StokerAbraham "Bram" StokerAbraham 'Bram' Stoker
Dracula is an 1897 Gothic horror novel by Irish author Bram Stoker.
Abraham "Bram" Stoker (8 November 1847 – 20 April 1912) was an Irish author, best known today for his 1897 Gothic novel Dracula.

Count Dracula

DraculaThe Countthe title role
It introduced the character of Count Dracula, and established many conventions of subsequent vampire fantasy.
Count Dracula is the title character of Bram Stoker's 1897 gothic horror novel Dracula.

Abraham Van Helsing

Van HelsingProfessor Van HelsingDr. Van Helsing
The novel tells the story of Dracula's attempt to move from Transylvania to England so that he may find new blood and spread the undead curse, and of the battle between Dracula and a small group of men and a woman led by Professor Abraham Van Helsing.
Professor Abraham Van Helsing is a fictional character from the 1897 gothic horror novel Dracula.

Vampire literature

vampirevampire fictionvampire genre
It introduced the character of Count Dracula, and established many conventions of subsequent vampire fantasy. Dracula has been assigned to many literary genres including vampire literature, horror fiction, the gothic novel, and invasion literature.
Later influential works include the penny dreadful Varney the Vampire (1847); Sheridan Le Fanu's tale of a lesbian vampire, Carmilla (1872), and the masterpiece of the genre: Bram Stoker's Dracula (1897).

Transylvania

TransylvanianTransilvaniaSiebenbürgen
The novel tells the story of Dracula's attempt to move from Transylvania to England so that he may find new blood and spread the undead curse, and of the battle between Dracula and a small group of men and a woman led by Professor Abraham Van Helsing. The tale begins with Jonathan Harker, a newly qualified English solicitor, visiting Count Dracula at his castle in the Carpathian Mountains on the border of Transylvania, Bukovina, and Moldavia, to provide legal support for a real estate transaction overseen by Harker's employer, Mr Peter Hawkins of Exeter.
The Anglosphere commonly associates Transylvania with vampires, thanks to the dominant influence of Bram Stoker's novel Dracula and the many films the tale inspired.

Jonathan Harker

JonathanHarkerJohn Harker
The tale begins with Jonathan Harker, a newly qualified English solicitor, visiting Count Dracula at his castle in the Carpathian Mountains on the border of Transylvania, Bukovina, and Moldavia, to provide legal support for a real estate transaction overseen by Harker's employer, Mr Peter Hawkins of Exeter.
Jonathan Harker is a fictional character and one of the main protagonists of Bram Stoker's 1897 Gothic horror novel Dracula.

Brides of Dracula

bridesDracula's bridesBride of Dracula
Wandering the Count's castle against Dracula's admonition, Harker encounters three female vampires, called "the sisters", from whom he is rescued by Dracula.
The Brides of Dracula are characters in Bram Stoker's 1897 novel Dracula.

Whitby

Whitby, North YorkshireWhitby, YorkshireWhitby, England
Not long afterward, the ship having weighed anchor at Varna, runs aground on the shores of Whitby in the east coast of England. Harker's fiancée, Mina Murray, is staying with her friend Lucy Westenra, who is holidaying in Whitby.
Its attraction as a tourist destination is enhanced by the proximity of the high ground of the North York Moors national park and the heritage coastline and by association with the horror novel Dracula.

Lucy Westenra

LucyLucy WestonLucy Kisslinger
Harker's fiancée, Mina Murray, is staying with her friend Lucy Westenra, who is holidaying in Whitby.
Lucy Westenra is a fictional character in the novel Dracula (1897) by Bram Stoker.

Invasion literature

invasion novelinvasion novelsfuture German invasion
Dracula has been assigned to many literary genres including vampire literature, horror fiction, the gothic novel, and invasion literature.
Dracula (1897) also tapped into English fears of foreign forces arriving unopposed on its shores, although between 1870 and 1903 the majority of these works assumed that the enemy would be France, rather than Germany.

Horror fiction

horrorHorror novelhorror story
Dracula has been assigned to many literary genres including vampire literature, horror fiction, the gothic novel, and invasion literature.
Dracula can be traced to the Prince of Wallachia Vlad III, whose alleged war crimes were published in German pamphlets.

Castle Dracula

Castle of Draculahis castlethe renowned castle
The tale begins with Jonathan Harker, a newly qualified English solicitor, visiting Count Dracula at his castle in the Carpathian Mountains on the border of Transylvania, Bukovina, and Moldavia, to provide legal support for a real estate transaction overseen by Harker's employer, Mr Peter Hawkins of Exeter.
Castle Dracula is the fictitious Transylvanian residence of Count Dracula, the vampire antagonist in Bram Stoker's 1897 horror novel Dracula.

John Seward

Dr. SewardJack SewardDr. John Seward
Lucy receives three marriage proposals from Dr. John Seward, Quincey Morris, and Arthur Holmwood (the son of Lord Godalming who later obtains the title himself ).
John "Jack" Seward, M.D. is a fictional character appearing in Bram Stoker's 1897 novel Dracula.

Renfield

R. M. RenfieldKnockMilo Renfield
Dracula communicates with Seward's patient, Renfield, an insane man who wishes to consume insects, spiders, birds, and rats to absorb their "life force".
R. M. Renfield is a fictional character that appears in Bram Stoker's 1897 Gothic horror novel Dracula.

Arthur Holmwood

HolmwoodLord GodalmingArthur "The Professor" Holmwood
Lucy receives three marriage proposals from Dr. John Seward, Quincey Morris, and Arthur Holmwood (the son of Lord Godalming who later obtains the title himself ).
Arthur "Art" Holmwood (later Lord Godalming) is a fictional character of Bram Stoker's novel Dracula.

Quincey Morris

Quincy MorrisQuinceyMorris
Lucy receives three marriage proposals from Dr. John Seward, Quincey Morris, and Arthur Holmwood (the son of Lord Godalming who later obtains the title himself ).
Quincey P. Morris is a fictional character in Bram Stoker's horror novel Dracula.

Epistolary novel

epistolaryepistolary formepistolary novels
The story is told in an epistolary format, as a series of letters, diary entries, newspaper articles, and ships' log entries, whose narrators are the novel's protagonists, and occasionally supplemented with newspaper clippings relating events not directly witnessed.
In the late 19th century, Bram Stoker released one of the most widely recognized and successful novels in the epistolary form to date, Dracula.

Mina Harker

Mina MurrayMinaWilhelmina "Mina" Murray
Harker's fiancée, Mina Murray, is staying with her friend Lucy Westenra, who is holidaying in Whitby.
Wilhelmina "Mina" Harker (née Murray) is a fictional character in Bram Stoker's 1897 Gothic horror novel Dracula.

Carmilla

Carmilla Karnsteinnovella of the same nameMircalla Karnstein
("From my grave to wander I am forc’d Still to seek The God’s long-sever’d link, Still to love the bridegroom I have lost, And the life-blood of his heart to drink;) Later Sheridan Le Fanu's 1871 Carmilla, about a lesbian vampire could have inspired Bram Stoker's Dracula, or Varney the Vampire, a lengthy penny dreadful serial from the mid-Victorian period by James Malcolm Rymer. John Polidori created the image of a vampire portrayed as an aristocratic man, like the character of Dracula, in his tale "The Vampyre" (1819). (He wrote Vampyre during a summer which he spent with Frankenstein creator Mary Shelley, her husband poet Percy Bysshe Shelley, and Lord Byron in 1816.)
Carmilla is an 1872 Gothic novella by Irish author Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu and one of the early works of vampire fiction, predating Bram Stoker's Dracula (1897) by 26 years.

Emily Gerard

Gerard, Emily
Before writing Dracula, Stoker spent seven years researching European folklore and stories of vampires, being most influenced by Emily Gerard's 1885 essay "Transylvania Superstitions" which includes content about a vampire myth.
(Jane) Emily Gerard (7 May 1849 – 11 January 1905) was a nineteenth-century author best known for the influence her collections of Transylvanian folklore had on Bram Stoker's 1897 novel Dracula.

Henry Irving

Sir Henry IrvingIrving[Henry] Irving
The Lyceum Theatre where Stoker worked between 1878 and 1898 was headed by actor-manager Henry Irving, who was Stoker's real-life inspiration for Dracula's mannerisms and who Stoker hoped would play Dracula in a stage version.
Irving is widely acknowledged to be one of the inspirations for Count Dracula, the title character of the 1897 novel Dracula whose author, Bram Stoker, was business manager of the theatre.

Vlad the Impaler

Vlad III the ImpalerVlad III DraculaVlad Tepes
Some historians are convinced that a historic figure, Vlad III Dracula, often called Vlad the Impaler, was the model for Stoker's Count although there is no supporting evidence.
Vlad's reputation for cruelty and his patronymic inspired the name of the vampire Count Dracula, for whom, however, he did not serve as the general inspiration, in Bram Stoker's 1897 novel Dracula.

Elizabeth Miller (academic)

Elizabeth MillerElizabeth (Russell) Miller
Dracula scholar Elizabeth Miller has remarked that aside from the name and some mention of Romanian history, the background of Stoker's Count bears no resemblance to that of Vlad III Dracula.
Since 1990, her major field of research has been Bram Stoker's novel Dracula, its author, sources and influence.

Kukri

KhukuriKhukrikukri knife
After dispatching many Gypsies who were sworn to protect the Count, Harker shears Dracula through the throat with a kukri knife, while the mortally wounded Quincey stabs the Count in the heart with a Bowie knife.
It gained literary attention in the 1897 novel Dracula by Irish author Bram Stoker.

Nosferatu

Nosferatu, eine Symphonie des GrauensNosferatu, a Symphony of HorrorNosferatu: A Symphony of Horror
But then F. W. Murnau's unauthorized adaptation of the story was released in theatres in 1922 in the form of Nosferatu.
The silent film, shot in 1921 and released the following year, was an unauthorized adaptation of Bram Stoker's Dracula (1897); the Stoker Estate had refused permission.