Drama

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Drama is the specific mode of fiction represented in performance: a play, opera, mime, ballet, etc, performed in a theatre, or on radio or television.wikipedia
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Radio drama

drama CDradio playaudio drama
Drama is the specific mode of fiction represented in performance: a play, opera, mime, ballet, etc, performed in a theatre, or on radio or television.
With no visual component, radio drama depends on dialogue, music and sound effects to help the listener imagine the characters and story: "It is auditory in the physical dimension but equally powerful as a visual force in the psychological dimension."

Tragedy

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The term "drama" comes from a Greek word meaning "action" (Classical Greek: δρᾶμα, drama), which is derived from "I do" (Classical Greek: δράω, drao). The two masks associated with drama represent the traditional generic division between comedy and tragedy. The theatrical culture of the city-state of Athens produced three genres of drama: tragedy, comedy, and the satyr play.
Tragedy (from the, tragōidia) is a form of drama based on human suffering that invokes an accompanying catharsis or pleasure in audiences.

Fiction

fictionalrealistic fictionfictitious
Drama is the specific mode of fiction represented in performance: a play, opera, mime, ballet, etc, performed in a theatre, or on radio or television.
More broadly, fiction has come to encompass imaginative storytelling in any format, including writings, theatrical performances, comics, films, television programs, animations, games (most notably, video games and role-playing games), and so on.

Poetry

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Considered as a genre of poetry in general, the dramatic mode has been contrasted with the epic and the lyrical modes ever since Aristotle's Poetics (c. 335 BC)—the earliest work of dramatic theory.
Ancient Greek attempts to define poetry, such as Aristotle's Poetics, focused on the uses of speech in rhetoric, drama, song and comedy.

Theatre

theaterstagetheatrical
Drama is the specific mode of fiction represented in performance: a play, opera, mime, ballet, etc, performed in a theatre, or on radio or television. The enactment of drama in theatre, performed by actors on a stage before an audience, presupposes collaborative modes of production and a collective form of reception.
The theatre of ancient Greece consisted of three types of drama: tragedy, comedy, and the satyr play.

Poetics (Aristotle)

PoeticsAristotle's PoeticsArs Poetica
Considered as a genre of poetry in general, the dramatic mode has been contrasted with the epic and the lyrical modes ever since Aristotle's Poetics (c. 335 BC)—the earliest work of dramatic theory.
In it, Aristotle offers an account of what he calls "poetry" (a term which in Greek literally means "making" and in this context includes verse drama – comedy, tragedy, and the satyr play – as well as lyric poetry and epic poetry).

Ivanov (play)

IvanovInanovIvanov'' (play)
"Drama" in this sense refers to a play that is neither a comedy nor a tragedy—for example, Zola's Thérèse Raquin (1873) or Chekhov's Ivanov (1887).
Ivanov (Иванов: драма в четырёх действиях (Ivanov: drama in four acts)) is a four-act drama by the Russian playwright Anton Chekhov.

Dramatic structure

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The structure of dramatic texts, unlike other forms of literature, is directly influenced by this collaborative production and collective reception.
Dramatic structure is the structure of a dramatic work such as a play or film.

Noh

Noh playNoh theater
Musicals include both spoken dialogue and songs; and some forms of drama have incidental music or musical accompaniment underscoring the dialogue (melodrama and Japanese Nō, for example).
Noh, derived from the Sino-Japanese word for "skill" or "talent", is a major form of classical Japanese musical drama that has been performed since the 14th century.

Literature

literaryLettersliterary work
The structure of dramatic texts, unlike other forms of literature, is directly influenced by this collaborative production and collective reception.
It can be further distinguished according to major forms such as the novel, short story or drama; and works are often categorized according to historical periods or their adherence to certain aesthetic features or expectations (genre).

Dramatic theory

theoreticaltheorist
Considered as a genre of poetry in general, the dramatic mode has been contrasted with the epic and the lyrical modes ever since Aristotle's Poetics (c. 335 BC)—the earliest work of dramatic theory.
Dramatic theory is a term used for works that attempt to form theories about theatre and drama.

Actor

actressfilm actorfilm actress
The enactment of drama in theatre, performed by actors on a stage before an audience, presupposes collaborative modes of production and a collective form of reception.
The exclusively male actors in the theatre of ancient Greece performed in three types of drama: tragedy, comedy, and the satyr play.

Ancient Greek comedy

comedyNew Comedycomic poet
Ancient Greek comedy is traditionally divided between "old comedy" (5th century BC), "middle comedy" (4th century BC) and "new comedy" (late 4th century to 2nd BC).
Ancient Greek comedy was one of the final three principal dramatic forms in the theatre of classical Greece (the others being tragedy and the satyr play).

Satyr play

satyr playssatyric dramasatyr drama
The theatrical culture of the city-state of Athens produced three genres of drama: tragedy, comedy, and the satyr play.
Satyric drama is one of the three varieties of Athenian drama, the other two being tragedy and comedy.

Drama (film and television)

drama filmdramatelevision drama
It is this narrower sense that the film and television industries, along with film studies, adopted to describe "drama" as a genre within their respective media.
All forms of cinema or television that involve fictional stories are forms of drama in the broader sense if their storytelling is achieved by means of actors who represent (mimesis) characters.

Episode

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In re-working the Greek originals, the Roman comic dramatists abolished the role of the chorus in dividing the drama into episodes and introduced musical accompaniment to its dialogue (between one-third of the dialogue in the comedies of Plautus and two-thirds in those of Terence).
An episode is a coherent narrative unit within a larger dramatic work, such as a radio or television series.

Liturgical drama

religious dramadevotional playgospel-drama
Beginning in the early Middle Ages, churches staged dramatised versions of biblical events, known as liturgical dramas, to enliven annual celebrations.
The premodern combination of liturgy, ritual and performance makes it especially difficult to apply the term "Drama".

Agon

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Their origins remain obscure, though by the 5th century BC they were institutionalised in competitions held as part of festivities celebrating the god Dionysus.
In Ancient Greek drama, particularly Old Comedy (fifth century B.C.), agon refers to a contest or debate between two characters - the protagonist and the antagonist - in the highly structured Classical tragedies and dramas.

Opera

opera singeroperasoperatic
Drama is the specific mode of fiction represented in performance: a play, opera, mime, ballet, etc, performed in a theatre, or on radio or television.
This is carried out in detail in the Fach system of German speaking countries, where historically opera and spoken drama were often put on by the same repertory company.

Play (theatre)

playplaysstage play
Drama is the specific mode of fiction represented in performance: a play, opera, mime, ballet, etc, performed in a theatre, or on radio or television.
Drama

Metatheatre

metatheatricalmeta-theatricalmeta-theatricality
The works of both playwrights are, in their different ways, both modernist and realist, incorporating formal experimentation, meta-theatricality, and social critique.
Metatheatre, and the closely related term metadrama, describes the aspects of a play that draw attention to its nature as drama or theatre, or to the circumstances of its performance.

Nineteenth-century theatre

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The pivotal and innovative contributions of the 19th-century Norwegian dramatist Henrik Ibsen and the 20th-century German theatre practitioner Bertolt Brecht dominate modern drama; each inspired a tradition of imitators, which include many of the greatest playwrights of the modern era.
Although monopolies and subsidies were reinstated under Napoleon, theatrical melodrama continued to be more popular and brought in larger audiences than the state-sponsored drama and operas.

Film genre

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It is this narrower sense that the film and television industries, along with film studies, adopted to describe "drama" as a genre within their respective media.
Similarly, while art films are referred to as a genre by film scholar David Bordwell, who states that "art cinema itself is a [film] genre, with its own distinct conventions", an art film can be in a number of genres (e.g., drama, experimental film, black comedy, etc.).

Theatre of ancient Greece

theatreancient Greek theatreGreek
The theatrical culture of the city-state of Athens produced three genres of drama: tragedy, comedy, and the satyr play.
Tragedy (late 500 BC), comedy (490 BC), and the satyr play were the three dramatic genres to emerge there.

Naturalism (theatre)

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Étienne Decroux, a pupil of his, was highly influenced by this and started exploring and developing the possibilities of mime and refined corporeal mime into a highly sculptural form, taking it outside of the realms of naturalism.
Naturalism is a movement in European drama and theatre that developed in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.