Dresden

Dresden, GermanyJohannstadtDreznoMax Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of SolidsAltmarktDrezdencity of DresdenDDDresden - SaxonyDresden City
Dresden (, ; ; Drážďany; Drezno) is the capital city of the German state of Saxony, and with around 550,000 inhabitants, it is the state's second most populous city after Leipzig.wikipedia
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Pirna

Pirna, GermanyGraupaLiebethaler
Dresden is contiguous with Freital, Pirna, Radebeul, Meissen and Coswig, and its urban area has around 780,000 inhabitants, making it the largest in Saxony.
Pirna is located near Dresden and is an important district town as well as a Große Kreisstadt.

Saxony

Free State of SaxonySaxonSachsen
Dresden (, ; ; Drážďany; Drezno) is the capital city of the German state of Saxony, and with around 550,000 inhabitants, it is the state's second most populous city after Leipzig.
Its capital is Dresden, and its largest city is Leipzig.

Meissen

MeißenMeissen, GermanyMeissen porcelain
Dresden is contiguous with Freital, Pirna, Radebeul, Meissen and Coswig, and its urban area has around 780,000 inhabitants, making it the largest in Saxony.
Meissen (in German orthography: Meißen, ) is a town of approximately 30,000 about 25 km northwest of Dresden on both banks of the Elbe river in the Free State of Saxony, in eastern Germany.

Sudetes

Sudeten MountainsSudetenSudetes Mountains
Most of Dresden's population lives in the Elbe Valley, but a large, albeit very sparsely populated area of the city east of the Elbe lies in the West Lusatian Hill Country and Uplands (the westernmost part of the Sudetes) and thus in Lusatia, while many boroughs west of the Elbe lie in the foreland of the Ore Mountains as well as in the valleys of the rivers rising there and flowing through Dresden, the longest of which are the Weißeritz and the Lockwitzbach.
They stretch from the Saxon capital of Dresden in the northwest, to the Głubczyce plateau (Płaskowyż Głubczycki) in Poland and to the Ostrava Basin and Moravian Gate (Moravská brána) in the Czech Republic in the east.

Bombing of Dresden in World War II

bombing of DresdenDresdenfirebombing of Dresden
The controversial American and British bombing of Dresden in World War II towards the end of the war killed approximately 25,000 people, many of whom were civilians, and destroyed the entire city centre.
The bombing of Dresden was a British/American aerial bombing attack on the city of Dresden, the capital of the German state of Saxony, during World War II in the European Theatre.

Freital

DöhlenZauckerodeHainsberg
Dresden is contiguous with Freital, Pirna, Radebeul, Meissen and Coswig, and its urban area has around 780,000 inhabitants, making it the largest in Saxony.
The town is situated on a small river, the Weißeritz, and is 8 km southwest of Dresden.

Dresden Frauenkirche

FrauenkircheFrauenkirche DresdenDresdner Frauenkirche
The most prominent building in the city of Dresden is the Frauenkirche. These include the Zwinger Royal Palace, the Japanese Palace, the Taschenbergpalais, the Pillnitz Castle and the two landmark churches: the Catholic Hofkirche and the Lutheran Frauenkirche.
The Dresden Frauenkirche (Dresdner Frauenkirche, Church of Our Lady) is a Lutheran church in Dresden, the capital of the German state of Saxony.

Radebeul

KötzschenbrodaNiederlößnitzRadebeul-Kötzschenbroda
Dresden is contiguous with Freital, Pirna, Radebeul, Meissen and Coswig, and its urban area has around 780,000 inhabitants, making it the largest in Saxony.
Radebeul is a town (große Kreisstadt) in the Elbe valley in the district of Meißen in Saxony, Germany, a suburb of Dresden.

Saxon Switzerland

SaxonA
Main sights are also the nearby National Park of Saxon Switzerland, the Ore Mountains and the countryside around Elbe Valley and Moritzburg Castle.
Saxon Switzerland (Sächsische Schweiz) is a hilly climbing area and national park around the Elbe valley south-east of Dresden in Saxony, Germany.

Leipzig

Leipzig, GermanyLeipsicLipsia
Dresden (, ; ; Drážďany; Drezno) is the capital city of the German state of Saxony, and with around 550,000 inhabitants, it is the state's second most populous city after Leipzig.
When it was made a terminus of the first German long-distance railway to Dresden (the capital of Saxony) in 1839, Leipzig became a hub of Central European railway traffic, with Leipzig Hauptbahnhof the largest terminal station by area in Europe.

Kingdom of Saxony

SaxonySaxonKing of Saxony
Dresden has a long history as the capital and royal residence for the Electors and Kings of Saxony, who for centuries furnished the city with cultural and artistic splendor, and was once by personal union the family seat of Polish monarchs.
Its capital was the city of Dresden, and its modern successor state is the Free State of Saxony.

Moritzburg Castle

Schloss MoritzburgFasanenschlösschenFasanenschlösslein
Main sights are also the nearby National Park of Saxon Switzerland, the Ore Mountains and the countryside around Elbe Valley and Moritzburg Castle.
Moritzburg Castle (Schloss Moritzburg) or Moritzburg Palace is a Baroque palace in Moritzburg, in the German state of Saxony, about 13 km northwest of the Saxon capital, Dresden.

Dresden Basin

Elbe Valley
Most of Dresden's population lives in the Elbe Valley, but a large, albeit very sparsely populated area of the city east of the Elbe lies in the West Lusatian Hill Country and Uplands (the westernmost part of the Sudetes) and thus in Lusatia, while many boroughs west of the Elbe lie in the foreland of the Ore Mountains as well as in the valleys of the rivers rising there and flowing through Dresden, the longest of which are the Weißeritz and the Lockwitzbach.
The city of Dresden lies in the Dresden Basin.

Green Vault

Grünes GewölbeNew Green VaultThe New Green Vault
Notable examples include the Dresden Porcelain Collection, the Collection of Prints, Drawings and Photographs, the Grünes Gewölbe and the Mathematisch-Physikalischer Salon.
The Green Vault (Grünes Gewölbe) is a museum located in Dresden, Germany, which contains the largest treasure collection in Europe.

Taschenbergpalais

These include the Zwinger Royal Palace, the Japanese Palace, the Taschenbergpalais, the Pillnitz Castle and the two landmark churches: the Catholic Hofkirche and the Lutheran Frauenkirche.
The Hotel Taschenbergpalais Kempinski Dresden is a palace hotel Palace (hotel) and belongs to the Kempinski Group Kempinski.

Mathematisch-Physikalischer Salon

Royal Cabinet of Mathematical and Physical Instruments
Notable examples include the Dresden Porcelain Collection, the Collection of Prints, Drawings and Photographs, the Grünes Gewölbe and the Mathematisch-Physikalischer Salon.
The Mathematisch-Physikalischer Salon (, Royal Cabinet of Mathematical and Physical Instruments) in Dresden, Germany, is a museum of historic clocks and scientific instruments.

Augustus II the Strong

Augustus IIAugustus the StrongAugust the Strong
The Elector and ruler of Saxony Frederick Augustus I became King Augustus II the Strong of Poland in 1697.
He established the Saxon capital of Dresden as a major cultural centre, attracting artists from across Europe to his court.

Kupferstich-Kabinett, Dresden

Kupferstich-KabinettCollection of Prints, Drawings and PhotographsKupferstichkabinett
Notable examples include the Dresden Porcelain Collection, the Collection of Prints, Drawings and Photographs, the Grünes Gewölbe and the Mathematisch-Physikalischer Salon.
The Kupferstich-Kabinett (English: Collection of Prints, Drawings and Photographs) is part of the Staatliche Kunstsammlungen (State Art Collections) of Dresden, Germany.

Dresden Porcelain Collection

Porzellansammlung
Notable examples include the Dresden Porcelain Collection, the Collection of Prints, Drawings and Photographs, the Grünes Gewölbe and the Mathematisch-Physikalischer Salon.
The Dresden Porcelain Collection (Porzellansammlung) is part of the Staatliche Kunstsammlungen (State Art Collections) of Dresden, Germany.

Baroque

Baroque styleBaroque eraBaroque period
The city was known as the Jewel Box, because of its baroque and rococo city centre.
Another work of baroque palace architecture is the Zwinger in Dresden, the former orangerie of the palace of the Dukes of Saxony in the 18th century.

Dresden Cathedral

Katholische HofkircheHofkircheCathedral of the Holy Trinity
These include the Zwinger Royal Palace, the Japanese Palace, the Taschenbergpalais, the Pillnitz Castle and the two landmark churches: the Catholic Hofkirche and the Lutheran Frauenkirche. After the war restoration work has helped to reconstruct parts of the historic inner city, including the Katholische Hofkirche, the Zwinger and the famous Semper Oper.
Dresden Cathedral, or the Cathedral of the Holy Trinity, Dresden, previously the Catholic Church of the Royal Court of Saxony, called in German Katholische Hofkirche and since 1980 also known as Kathedrale Sanctissimae Trinitatis, is the Catholic Cathedral of Dresden.

Battle of Dresden

Dresdenvictory at DresdenBattles of Dresden
During the Napoleonic Wars the French emperor made it a base of operations, winning there the famous Battle of Dresden on 27 August 1813.
The battle took place around the city of Dresden in modern-day Germany.

May Uprising in Dresden

May Uprising1849 RevolutionDresden Uprising
Dresden itself was a centre of the German Revolutions in 1848 with the May Uprising, which cost human lives and damaged the historic town of Dresden.
The May Uprising took place in Dresden, Kingdom of Saxony in 1849; it was one of the last of the series of events known as the Revolutions of 1848.

Warsaw

WarszawaWarsaw, PolandWarschau
In 1730, it was relocated to Warsaw.
The Saxon monarchs brought many renowned German architects, who rebuilt the city in a style similar to Dresden.

Ore Mountains

ErzgebirgeOre MountainKrušné hory
Most of Dresden's population lives in the Elbe Valley, but a large, albeit very sparsely populated area of the city east of the Elbe lies in the West Lusatian Hill Country and Uplands (the westernmost part of the Sudetes) and thus in Lusatia, while many boroughs west of the Elbe lie in the foreland of the Ore Mountains as well as in the valleys of the rivers rising there and flowing through Dresden, the longest of which are the Weißeritz and the Lockwitzbach.
A similar but smaller basin with abandoned coal deposits, the Döhlen Basin, is located southwest of Dresden on the northern edge of the Ore Mountains.