A report on Drupe and Prunus spinosa

Diagram of a typical drupe (peach), showing both fruit and seed
The development sequence of a typical drupe, a smooth-skinned (nectarine) type of peach (Prunus persica) over a 7 1⁄2-month period, from bud formation in early winter to fruit ripening in midsummer
Plant in flower in early spring
Assorted drupes
Blackthorn shrub in the Vogelsberg
The peach is a typical drupe (stone fruit)
Sloe flower, fruit, seed and leaves illustrated by Otto Wilhelm Thomé (1885)
'Elena', a freestone prune plum
Pocket plum gall on blackthorn, caused by the fungus Taphrina pruni
The pit of a nectarine
Blackthorn in blossom
Unripe drupes of black pepper
Global plum and sloe output in 2005
'Black Butte' blackberry, a bramble fruit of aggregated drupelets
Grafted blackthorn tree; called a husband and wife tree
A ripe areca nut
Ginkgo "fruits", often noted as drupe-like

The fruit, called a "sloe", is a drupe 10 – in diameter, black with a purple-blue waxy bloom, ripening in autumn and harvested – traditionally, at least in the UK – in October or November after the first frosts.

- Prunus spinosa

Other examples include sloe (Prunus spinosa) and ivy (Hedera helix).

- Drupe
Diagram of a typical drupe (peach), showing both fruit and seed

2 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Damson

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The damson or damson plum (Prunus domestica subsp.

The damson or damson plum (Prunus domestica subsp.

Damson flowers
Comparison of plum stones: Shropshire damson shown top row, second from left (no. 2). From Charles Darwin's Variation of Animals and Plants under Domestication
Shropshire Damson, shown at centre left. Other plums shown are Imperial Gage (labelled 1), Lombard (3), Maynard (4) and Yellow Egg (5).
Slivovitz is a distilled beverage made from damson plums.

insititia, or sometimes Prunus insititia), also archaically called the "damascene", is an edible drupaceous fruit, a subspecies of the plum tree.

insititia is still extremely debatable: it is often thought to have arisen in wild crosses, possibly in Asia Minor, between the sloe, Prunus spinosa, and the cherry plum, Prunus cerasifera.

African Rose plums (Japanese or Chinese plum)

Plum

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Fruit of some species in Prunus subg. Prunus. Dried plums are called prunes.

Fruit of some species in Prunus subg. Prunus. Dried plums are called prunes.

African Rose plums (Japanese or Chinese plum)
Plum flowers
Plum unripe fruits
Prune, a dried plum
Japanese or Chinese plum
Damsons (European plum)
Prune plums (European plum)
Victoria plums (European plum)
Greengages (European plum)
Mirabelles (European plum)
Myrobalan or cherry plums
Sloe or blackthorn, Prunus spinosa
Dried yellow plums
Black Amber Plum (Japanese or Chinese plum)

The plum is a drupe, meaning its fleshy fruit surrounds a single hard fruitstone which encloses the fruit's seed.

In 2019, global production of plums (data combined with sloes) was 12.6 million tonnes, led by China with 56% of the world total (table).