Drupe

Diagram of a typical drupe (peach), showing both fruit and seed
The development sequence of a typical drupe, a smooth-skinned (nectarine) type of peach (Prunus persica) over a 7 1⁄2-month period, from bud formation in early winter to fruit ripening in midsummer
Assorted drupes
The peach is a typical drupe (stone fruit)
'Elena', a freestone prune plum
The pit of a nectarine
Unripe drupes of black pepper
'Black Butte' blackberry, a bramble fruit of aggregated drupelets
A ripe areca nut
Ginkgo "fruits", often noted as drupe-like

Indehiscent fruit in which an outer fleshy part (exocarp, or skin, and mesocarp, or flesh) surrounds a single shell (the pit, stone, or pyrena) of hardened endocarp with a seed (kernel) inside.

- Drupe
Diagram of a typical drupe (peach), showing both fruit and seed

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Culinary fruits

Fruit

Seed-bearing structure in flowering plants that is formed from the ovary after flowering.

Seed-bearing structure in flowering plants that is formed from the ovary after flowering.

Culinary fruits
Caraway fruits. A common mistake is to call these and similar ones "seeds".
Pomegranate display of the exocarp (right) and seeds and edible sarcotesta (left)
An arrangement of fruits commonly thought of as culinary vegetables, including corn (maize), tomatoes, and various squash
The development sequence of a typical drupe, the nectarine (Prunus persica) over a 7.5 month period, from bud formation in early winter to fruit ripening in midsummer (see [[:File:Nectarine Fruit Development.jpg|image page]] for further information)
The parts of a flower, showing the stigma-style-ovary system.
An apple is a simple fleshy fruit. Key parts are the epicarp, or exocarp, or outer skin, (not labelled); and the mezocarp and endocarp (labelled).
Insertion point: There are 3 positions of insertion of the ovary at the base of a flower: I superior; II half-inferior; III inferior. The 'insertion point' is where the androecium parts (a), the petals (p), and the sepals (s) all converge and attach to the receptacle (r). (Ovary= gynoecium (g).)
In the noni, flowers are produced in time-sequence along the stem. It is possible to see a progression of flowering, fruit development, and fruit ripening.
Dewberry flowers. Note the multiple pistils, each of which will produce a drupelet. Each flower will become a blackberry-like aggregate fruit.
Dewberry fruit
A dry simple fruit: milkweed (Asclepias syriaca); dehiscence of the follicular fruit reveals seeds within.
Fruits of four different banana cultivars (Bananas are berries.)
Strawberry, showing achenes attached to surface. Botanically, strawberries are not berries; they are classified as an aggregate accessory fruit.
Flower of Magnolia × wieseneri showing the many pistils making up the gynoecium in the middle of the flower. The fruit of this flower is an aggregation of follicles.
Detail of the raspberry flower: there is a clustering of pistils at the center of the flower. (A pistil consists of stigma, style, and ovary.) The stigma is the apical (at the apex) nodule that receives pollen; the style is the stem-like column that extends down to the ovary, which is the basal part that contains the seed-forming ovule.
Lilium unripe capsule fruit; an aggregate fruit.
The fruit of a pineapple includes tissue from the sepals as well as the pistils of many flowers. It is a multiple-accessory fruit.
Picking blackberries in Oklahoma
Comparing fresh fruits for fiber, potassium (K), and vitamin C. Each disk-point refers to a 100 g serving of the fresh fruit named. The size of the disk represents the amount of fiber (as percentage of the recommended daily allowance, RDA) in a serving of fruit (see key at upper right). The amount of vitamin C (as percent RDA) is plotted on the x–axis and the amount of potassium (K), in mg on the y–axis. + Bananas are high in value for fiber and potassium, and oranges for fiber and vitamin C. (Apricots are highest in potassium; strawberries are rich in vitamin C.) Watermelon, providing low levels of both K and vitamin C and almost no fiber, is of least value for the three nutrients together.
Porcelain vine is usually planted for its showy, colourful berries.

As the ovules develop into seeds, the ovary begins to ripen and the ovary wall, the pericarp, may become fleshy (as in berries or drupes), or it may form a hard outer covering (as in nuts).

Chestnuts are both botanical and culinary nuts.

Nut (fruit)

Fruit consisting of a hard or tough nutshell protecting a kernel which is usually edible.

Fruit consisting of a hard or tough nutshell protecting a kernel which is usually edible.

Chestnuts are both botanical and culinary nuts.
Some common "culinary nuts": hazelnuts, which are also botanical nuts; Brazil nuts, which are not botanical nuts, but rather the seeds of a capsule; and walnuts, pecans, and almonds (which are not botanical nuts, but rather the seeds of drupes)
Nuts being sold in a market
Raw mixed nuts, sold as a snack food.

Also widely known as nuts are dry drupes, which include pecans (Carya illinoensis), almonds (Prunus amygdalus), macadamia (Macadamia integrifolia), candlenut (Aleurites moluccanus), water caltrop (Trapa bicornis) and walnuts (Juglans regia).

Longitudinal section of a female flower of a squash plant (courgette), showing the ovary, ovules, pistil and petals

Fruit anatomy

Plant anatomy of the internal structure of fruit.

Plant anatomy of the internal structure of fruit.

Longitudinal section of a female flower of a squash plant (courgette), showing the ovary, ovules, pistil and petals
Diagram of a typical drupe (peach), showing both fruit and seed
A schematic picture of an orange hesperidium
A segment of an orange that has been opened to show the pulp (juice vesicles) of the endocarp
Almond endocarp

The types of fleshy fruits are berries, pomes, and drupes.

Seeds of various plants. Row 1: poppy, red pepper, strawberry, apple tree, blackberry, rice, carum, Row 2: mustard, eggplant, physalis, grapes, raspberries, red rice, patchouli, Row 3: figs, lycium barbarum, beets, blueberries, golden kiwifruit, rosehip, basil, Row 4: pink pepper, tomato, radish, carrot, matthiola, dill, coriander, Row 5: black pepper, white cabbage, napa cabbage, seabuckthorn, parsley, dandelion, capsella bursa-pastoris, Row 6: cauliflower, radish, kiwifruit, grenadilla, passion fruit, melissa, tagetes erecta.

Seed

Embryonic plant enclosed in a protective outer covering, along with a food reserve.

Embryonic plant enclosed in a protective outer covering, along with a food reserve.

Seeds of various plants. Row 1: poppy, red pepper, strawberry, apple tree, blackberry, rice, carum, Row 2: mustard, eggplant, physalis, grapes, raspberries, red rice, patchouli, Row 3: figs, lycium barbarum, beets, blueberries, golden kiwifruit, rosehip, basil, Row 4: pink pepper, tomato, radish, carrot, matthiola, dill, coriander, Row 5: black pepper, white cabbage, napa cabbage, seabuckthorn, parsley, dandelion, capsella bursa-pastoris, Row 6: cauliflower, radish, kiwifruit, grenadilla, passion fruit, melissa, tagetes erecta.
Plant ovules: Gymnosperm ovule on left, angiosperm ovule (inside ovary) on right
The inside of a Ginkgo seed, showing a well-developed embryo, nutritive tissue (megagametophyte), and a bit of the surrounding seed coat
The parts of an avocado seed (a dicot), showing the seed coat and embryo
Diagram of the internal structure of a dicot seed and embryo: (a) seed coat, (b) endosperm, (c) cotyledon, (d) hypocotyl
Diagram of a generalized dicot seed (1) versus a generalized monocot seed (2). A. Scutellum B. Cotyledon C. Hilum D. Plumule E. Radicle F. Endosperm
Comparison of monocotyledons and dicotyledons
Seed coat of pomegranate
A collection of various vegetable and herb seeds
Dandelion seeds are contained within achenes, which can be carried long distances by the wind.
The seed pod of milkweed (Asclepias syriaca)
Germinating sunflower seedlings
Microbial transmission from seed to seedling
Phaseolus vulgaris (common bean or green bean) seeds are diverse in size, shape, and color.
The massive fruit of the coco de mer

Different groups of plants have other modifications, the so-called stone fruits (such as the peach) have a hardened fruit layer (the endocarp) fused to and surrounding the actual seed.

Almond

Species of tree native to Iran and surrounding countries, including the Levant.

Species of tree native to Iran and surrounding countries, including the Levant.

Almond in shell, shell cracked open, unshelled and blanched seed
Occasionally two seeds occur
Persian miniature depiction of the almond harvest at Qand-i Badam, Fergana Valley (16th century)
Almond tree with blossoming flowers, Valley of Elah, Israel
Flowering (sweet) almond tree
Blossoming of bitter almond tree
Almond cream cake covered in slivered almonds
Colomba di Pasqua, traditional Italian Easter bread
Danish cream cake covered with marzipan
Almond oil
Green almonds
Almond shell
Blanched almonds
A grove of almond trees
Almond blossoms
Young almond fruit
Mature almond fruit
An almond shaker before and during a harvest of a tree

The fruit of the almond is a drupe, consisting of an outer hull and a hard shell with the seed, which is not a true nut.

Blackberry

Edible fruit produced by many species in the genus Rubus in the family Rosaceae, hybrids among these species within the subgenus Rubus, and hybrids between the subgenera Rubus and Idaeobatus.

Edible fruit produced by many species in the genus Rubus in the family Rosaceae, hybrids among these species within the subgenus Rubus, and hybrids between the subgenera Rubus and Idaeobatus.

Second-year flowering, fruiting floricanes to the left. First-year primocanes without flowers or fruit growing on the right.
A tree bumblebee (Bombus hypnorum) pollinating blackberries
A wild blackberry harvest
Black Butte blackberry
The pale pink blackberry blossom

Botanically it is termed an aggregate fruit, composed of small drupelets.

Longitudinal section of female flower of squash showing pistil (=ovary+style+stigma), ovules, and petals. The petals and sepals are above the ovary; such a flower is said to have an inferior ovary, or the flower is said to be epigynous.

Ovary (botany)

Ovary is a part of the female reproductive organ of the flower or gynoecium.

Ovary is a part of the female reproductive organ of the flower or gynoecium.

Longitudinal section of female flower of squash showing pistil (=ovary+style+stigma), ovules, and petals. The petals and sepals are above the ovary; such a flower is said to have an inferior ovary, or the flower is said to be epigynous.
Cross section of Tulip ovary
Simple fruits are derived from one ovary of a single flower, while aggregate fruits are derived from many ovaries of one flower. Differently, a multiple fruit is derived from multiple ovaries each from their own individual flowers.
The orange is a simple fruit called a hesperidium. It is the mature ovary of a single orange blossom. Though it seems to have sections when cut open, all of these sections together come from a single ovary that develops into different layers.
The raspberry is an aggregate fruit. Each raspberry develops from one flower, but its flower has many ovaries that become the small circular drupes making up the raspberry. There is a seed in each drupe.Longitudinal_section_of_raspberry_flower.gif
The pineapple is a multiple fruit. Each of the purple spikes in this picture are a separate flower, so the whole structure is an inflorescence. This means that the small sections of a pineapple are each a fruit that develop from a separate ovary, and together they make up a multiple fruit.
Ovary insertion: I superior II half-inferior III inferior. a androecium g gynoecium p petals s sepals r receptacle. The insertion point is where a, p, and s converge.
The syncarpous ovary of this melon is made up of four carpels, and has one locule.
In this Peganum harmala, the ovary of a fruit has split into valves.
The seeds in a tomato fruit grow from placental areas at the interior of the ovary. (This is axile placentation in a bi-locular fruit.)
The placentae in Lunaria are along the margins of the fruit, where two carpels fuse. (This is parietal placentation in a bi-locular fruit.)
The valves of Lunaria fruit fall to reveal a septum that was between the two carpels of the ovary.

Further complicating this, culinary nuts are not always botanical nuts; some culinary nuts such as the coconut and almond are another type of fruit called a drupe.

Redcurrants, a type of berry derived from a simple (one-carpel) inferior ovary

Berry (botany)

Redcurrants, a type of berry derived from a simple (one-carpel) inferior ovary
Kiwifruit, a berry derived from a compound (many carpellate) superior ovary
Diagram of a grape berry, showing the pericarp and its layers
Coffee cherries (Coffea arabica) – described as drupes or berries
Cross-section of a cucumber pepo (Cucumis sativus)
Yew "berries" are female conifer cones.
Some fruits classified as bacca (berries) by Gaertner (De Fructibus et Seminibus Plantarum, Tab. 28)
Flowers and berries of Cestrum tomentosum
A type of sapote fruit displayed for sale (Quararibea cordata)
Bottle gourd or calabash used to contain palm wine in Bandundu Province, Democratic Republic of the Congo
Mandarins, here served in a Hong Kong restaurant, are among the oldest cultivated citrus fruits.
Four banana and plantain cultivars
Watermelon
Grapes

In botany, a berry is a fleshy fruit without a stone (pit) produced from a single flower containing one ovary.

Peach

Deciduous tree first domesticated and cultivated in Zhejiang province of Eastern China.

Deciduous tree first domesticated and cultivated in Zhejiang province of Eastern China.

Peach flowers
Dried date, peach, apricot, and stones from Lahun, Fayum, Egypt, Late Middle Kingdom, Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology, London
A peach flower with a bee pollinating it
White peach of the clingstone variety
White nectarines, whole and cut open
The developmental sequence of a nectarine over a 7 1⁄2-month period, from bud formation in early winter to fruit ripening in midsummer
Pierre-Auguste Renoir, A Still Life Painting of Peaches, 1881–82
A peach tree in blossom
Peach blossoms
Incipient fruit development
Peach (cultivar 'Berry') – watercolour, 1895
Claude Monet, A Jar of Peaches, {{circa|1866}}
Girl with Peaches
Still Life Basket of Peaches
Portrait of Isabella and John Stewart
Prunus persica - MHNT
Momotarō emerges from a peach.

Peaches, along with cherries, plums, and apricots, are stone fruits (drupes).

Apricot

Fruit, or the tree that bears the fruit, of several species in the genus Prunus.

Fruit, or the tree that bears the fruit, of several species in the genus Prunus.

Map of the etymology of "apricot" from Latin via Late and Byzantine Greek to Arabic, Spanish and Catalan, Middle French, and so to English
Apricot leaves
Preparing apricots in the grounds of Alchi Monastery, Ladakh, India
David Packard's apricot orchard in Los Altos Hills, preserved by the David and Lucile Packard Foundation, is one of the few remaining in Santa Clara County, where apricots were a major crop before the urban sprawl of Silicon Valley.
Drying apricot fruits (Fergana, Uzbekistan)
Dried date, peach, apricot, and stones. From Lahun, Fayum, Egypt. Late Middle Kingdom. The Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology, London
Blooms of an apricot
Apricot kernel (endocarp and seed)
Dried apricot, with dark color due to absence of sulfur dioxide treatment
Prunus sibirica (Siberian apricot; hardy to {{convert|-50|°C|F}} but with less palatable fruit)
Apricot tree, Turkey
Apricots drying on the ground in Cappadocia
Syrian apricot paste
Packaging apricot fruits in Uzbekistan
Drying apricot fruits

The fruit is a drupe (stonefruit) similar to a small peach, 1.5 – diameter (larger in some modern cultivars), from yellow to orange, often tinged red on the side most exposed to the sun; its surface can be smooth (botanically described as: glabrous) or velvety with very short hairs (botanically: pubescent).