Drupe

Diagram of a typical drupe (peach), showing both fruit and seed
The development sequence of a typical drupe, a smooth-skinned (nectarine) type of peach (Prunus persica) over a 7 1⁄2-month period, from bud formation in early winter to fruit ripening in midsummer
Assorted drupes
The peach is a typical drupe (stone fruit)
'Elena', a freestone prune plum
The pit of a nectarine
Unripe drupes of black pepper
'Black Butte' blackberry, a bramble fruit of aggregated drupelets
A ripe areca nut
Ginkgo "fruits", often noted as drupe-like

Indehiscent fruit in which an outer fleshy part (exocarp, or skin, and mesocarp, or flesh) surrounds a single shell (the pit, stone, or pyrena) of hardened endocarp with a seed (kernel) inside.

- Drupe
Diagram of a typical drupe (peach), showing both fruit and seed

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Culinary fruits

Fruit

Seed-bearing structure in flowering plants that is formed from the ovary after flowering.

Seed-bearing structure in flowering plants that is formed from the ovary after flowering.

Culinary fruits
Caraway fruits. A common mistake is to call these and similar ones "seeds".
Pomegranate display of the exocarp (right) and seeds and edible sarcotesta (left)
An arrangement of fruits commonly thought of as culinary vegetables, including corn (maize), tomatoes, and various squash
The development sequence of a typical drupe, the nectarine (Prunus persica) over a 7.5 month period, from bud formation in early winter to fruit ripening in midsummer (see [[:File:Nectarine Fruit Development.jpg|image page]] for further information)
The parts of a flower, showing the stigma-style-ovary system.
An apple is a simple fleshy fruit. Key parts are the epicarp, or exocarp, or outer skin, (not labelled); and the mezocarp and endocarp (labelled).
Insertion point: There are 3 positions of insertion of the ovary at the base of a flower: I superior; II half-inferior; III inferior. The 'insertion point' is where the androecium parts (a), the petals (p), and the sepals (s) all converge and attach to the receptacle (r). (Ovary= gynoecium (g).)
In the noni, flowers are produced in time-sequence along the stem. It is possible to see a progression of flowering, fruit development, and fruit ripening.
Dewberry flowers. Note the multiple pistils, each of which will produce a drupelet. Each flower will become a blackberry-like aggregate fruit.
Dewberry fruit
A dry simple fruit: milkweed (Asclepias syriaca); dehiscence of the follicular fruit reveals seeds within.
Fruits of four different banana cultivars (Bananas are berries.)
Strawberry, showing achenes attached to surface. Botanically, strawberries are not berries; they are classified as an aggregate accessory fruit.
Flower of Magnolia × wieseneri showing the many pistils making up the gynoecium in the middle of the flower. The fruit of this flower is an aggregation of follicles.
Detail of the raspberry flower: there is a clustering of pistils at the center of the flower. (A pistil consists of stigma, style, and ovary.) The stigma is the apical (at the apex) nodule that receives pollen; the style is the stem-like column that extends down to the ovary, which is the basal part that contains the seed-forming ovule.
Lilium unripe capsule fruit; an aggregate fruit.
The fruit of a pineapple includes tissue from the sepals as well as the pistils of many flowers. It is a multiple-accessory fruit.
Picking blackberries in Oklahoma
Comparing fresh fruits for fiber, potassium (K), and vitamin C. Each disk-point refers to a 100 g serving of the fresh fruit named. The size of the disk represents the amount of fiber (as percentage of the recommended daily allowance, RDA) in a serving of fruit (see key at upper right). The amount of vitamin C (as percent RDA) is plotted on the x–axis and the amount of potassium (K), in mg on the y–axis. + Bananas are high in value for fiber and potassium, and oranges for fiber and vitamin C. (Apricots are highest in potassium; strawberries are rich in vitamin C.) Watermelon, providing low levels of both K and vitamin C and almost no fiber, is of least value for the three nutrients together.
Porcelain vine is usually planted for its showy, colourful berries.

As the ovules develop into seeds, the ovary begins to ripen and the ovary wall, the pericarp, may become fleshy (as in berries or drupes), or it may form a hard outer covering (as in nuts).

Chestnuts are both botanical and culinary nuts.

Nut (fruit)

Fruit consisting of a hard or tough nutshell protecting a kernel which is usually edible.

Fruit consisting of a hard or tough nutshell protecting a kernel which is usually edible.

Chestnuts are both botanical and culinary nuts.
Some common "culinary nuts": hazelnuts, which are also botanical nuts; Brazil nuts, which are not botanical nuts, but rather the seeds of a capsule; and walnuts, pecans, and almonds (which are not botanical nuts, but rather the seeds of drupes)
Nuts being sold in a market
Raw mixed nuts, sold as a snack food.

Also widely known as nuts are dry drupes, which include pecans (Carya illinoensis), almonds (Prunus amygdalus), macadamia (Macadamia integrifolia), candlenut (Aleurites moluccanus), water caltrop (Trapa bicornis) and walnuts (Juglans regia).

Pistachio

Small tree originating from Central Asia and the Middle East.

Small tree originating from Central Asia and the Middle East.

Leaves of a pistachio tree in Syria.
Dormant Kerman pistachio trees in California.
Pistachio fruit, Torbat-e Heydarieh, Razavi Khorasan, Iran
Pistachio nuts from Iran
Pistachio Turkish delight

The fruit is a drupe, containing an elongated seed, which is the edible portion.

Bramble in August. Unripe fruit visible on second-year side shoots in the background with late flowers from the tip-flowering of first-year growth.

Bramble

Any rough, tangled, prickly shrub, usually in the genus Rubus, which grows blackberries, raspberries, or dewberries.

Any rough, tangled, prickly shrub, usually in the genus Rubus, which grows blackberries, raspberries, or dewberries.

Bramble in August. Unripe fruit visible on second-year side shoots in the background with late flowers from the tip-flowering of first-year growth.
Pink blackberry flower, Wellington, New Zealand
Blackberry fruit from a bramble
Scything woodland brambles in Kent, England, preparatory to poisoning emerging new spring shoots

Each small unit is called a drupelet.

Prunus spinosa

Species of flowering plant in the rose family Rosaceae.

Species of flowering plant in the rose family Rosaceae.

Plant in flower in early spring
Blackthorn shrub in the Vogelsberg
Sloe flower, fruit, seed and leaves illustrated by Otto Wilhelm Thomé (1885)
Pocket plum gall on blackthorn, caused by the fungus Taphrina pruni
Blackthorn in blossom
Global plum and sloe output in 2005
Grafted blackthorn tree; called a husband and wife tree

The fruit, called a "sloe", is a drupe 10 – in diameter, black with a purple-blue waxy bloom, ripening in autumn and harvested – traditionally, at least in the UK – in October or November after the first frosts.

Pecan

Species of hickory native to the southern United States and northern Mexico in the region of the Mississippi River.

Species of hickory native to the southern United States and northern Mexico in the region of the Mississippi River.

An old-growth pecan tree
A gigantic pecan tree in Oklahoma
Pecan trees being irrigated in Anthony, New Mexico
A cluster of pecan fruit is exposed as hulls dry out and split open
Pecan sprouting in moist wood-chip mulch in Eastern Oklahoma
Bud
Immature pecan fruits
Ripe pecan nuts on tree
Carya illinoinensis, MHNT
Shelled and unshelled pecans
Pecan halves
Pecan pie
thumb|Pecan tree in Oklahoma loaded with fruits

A pecan, like the fruit of all other members of the hickory genus, is not truly a nut, but is technically a drupe, a fruit with a single stone or pit, surrounded by a husk.

Blackberry

Edible fruit produced by many species in the genus Rubus in the family Rosaceae, hybrids among these species within the subgenus Rubus, and hybrids between the subgenera Rubus and Idaeobatus.

Edible fruit produced by many species in the genus Rubus in the family Rosaceae, hybrids among these species within the subgenus Rubus, and hybrids between the subgenera Rubus and Idaeobatus.

Second-year flowering, fruiting floricanes to the left. First-year primocanes without flowers or fruit growing on the right.
A tree bumblebee (Bombus hypnorum) pollinating blackberries
A wild blackberry harvest
Black Butte blackberry
The pale pink blackberry blossom

Botanically it is termed an aggregate fruit, composed of small drupelets.

Blackthorn, Prunus spinosa

Berry

Small, pulpy, and often edible fruit.

Small, pulpy, and often edible fruit.

Blackthorn, Prunus spinosa
Rubus berries have been cultivated by crossbreeding to create a diverse range of brambleberries with desirable traits
Cloudberry, common flowering plant in the cool temperate regions, alpine and arctic tundra and boreal forest.
Example of color contrast in (mostly inedible) wild berries
Mixed frozen berries
A slice of blueberry pie
Elderberry jam on bread
Various dried berries
Japanese barberries
Bilberry
Red currants
Honeysuckle
Gooseberries
Cloudberry
Highbush blueberries
Blackberries

The fruits of blackthorn may be called "sloe berries", but botanically are small stone fruits or drupes, like plums or apricots.

Hickory

Common name for trees composing the genus Carya, which includes around 18 species.

Common name for trees composing the genus Carya, which includes around 18 species.

Roasted Carya cathayensis (Chinese hickory)
Nuts of Carya texana (black hickory)
Foliage of Carya cordiformis (bitternut hickory)
Finished hickory in a cabinet
Comparison of North American Carya nuts
Ripe hickory nuts ready to fall
Autumn foliage

Hickory nuts (Carya) and walnuts (Juglans) in the Juglandaceae family grow within an outer husk; these fruits are sometimes considered to be drupes or drupaceous nuts, rather than true botanical nuts.

Display of various foods

Food

Any substance consumed to provide nutritional support for an organism.

Any substance consumed to provide nutritional support for an organism.

Display of various foods
A typical aquatic food web
Foods from plant sources
Various raw meats
Structure of sucrose
Salt mounds in Bolivia
Typical Balinese cuisine in Indonesia
A French basil salmon terrine, with eye-appealing garnishes
A refrigerator helps to keep foods fresh.
Many types of fish ready to be eaten, including salmon and tuna
Cooking with a wok in China
A stainless steel frying pan
A traditional asado (barbecue)
Café Procope in Paris was founded in 1686
The Allyn House restaurant menu (5 March 1859)
SeaWiFS image for the global biosphere
Global average daily calorie consumption in 1995
Food imports in 2005
Population density by country
A tractor pulling a chaser bin
Packaged household food items
Packaged food aisles of supermarket in Portland, Oregon, United States of America
Some essential food products including bread, rice and pasta
MyPlate replaced MyPyramid as the USDA nutrition guide.
Salmonella bacteria is a common cause of foodborne illness, particularly in undercooked chicken and chicken eggs.

Fleshy fruits (distinguishable from dry fruits like grain, seeds and nuts) can be further classified as stone fruits (cherries and peaches), pome fruits (apples, pears), berries (blackberry, strawberry), citrus (oranges, lemon), melons (watermelon, cantaloupe), Mediterranean fruits (grapes, fig), tropical fruits (banana, pineapple).