Dual-route hypothesis to reading aloud

DRC modeldual route hypothesis of readingdual route theorydual-route approachdual-route" theory
The dual-route theory of reading aloud was first described in the early 1970s.wikipedia
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Reading

readReading (process)reader
This theory suggests that two separate mental mechanisms, or cognitive routes, are involved in reading aloud, with output of both mechanisms contributing to the pronunciation of a written stimulus.
Reading aloud for one's own use, for better comprehension, is a form of intrapersonal communication: in the early 1970s has been proposed the dual-route hypothesis to reading aloud, accordingly to which there were two separate mental mechanisms, or cognitive routes, that are involved in this case, with output of both mechanisms contributing to the pronunciation of a written stimulus.

Reading for special needs

disordered readingdual-route coding modelreading remediation
The dual-route hypothesis to reading can help explain patterns of data connected to certain types of disordered reading, both developmental and acquired.
The dual-route approach suggests that two separate mechanisms, or routes, can be used in word reading.

Pronunciation

pronouncedpronouncepronouncing
This theory suggests that two separate mental mechanisms, or cognitive routes, are involved in reading aloud, with output of both mechanisms contributing to the pronunciation of a written stimulus.

Pseudoword

nonsense syllablenon-wordnon-words
This route doesn't enable reading of nonwords (example 'zuce').

Speech production

vocalizationproductionSpeech
There is still no conclusive evidence whether the lexical route functions as a direct pathway going from visual word recognition straight to speech production, or a less direct pathway going from visual word recognition to semantic processing and finally to speech production.

Semantics

semanticsemanticallymeaning
There is still no conclusive evidence whether the lexical route functions as a direct pathway going from visual word recognition straight to speech production, or a less direct pathway going from visual word recognition to semantic processing and finally to speech production.

Phoneme

phonemicphonemesphonemically
This is done by identifying the word's constituent parts (letters, phonemes, graphemes) and, applying knowledge of how these parts are associated with each other, for example how a string of neighboring letters sound together.

Grapheme

graphemescharacterscharacter
This is done by identifying the word's constituent parts (letters, phonemes, graphemes) and, applying knowledge of how these parts are associated with each other, for example how a string of neighboring letters sound together.

Orthography

orthographicorthographiesorthographically
A written language is described as transparent when it strongly adheres to spelling-sound rules and contains few exception words.

Dyslexia

dyslexicalexiadevelopmental dyslexia
The dual-route hypothesis to reading can help explain patterns of data connected to certain types of disordered reading, both developmental and acquired.

Computational model

computational modelsmodelanalytics software
A computational model of a cognitive task is essentially a computer program that aims to mimic human cognitive processing This type of model helps bring out the precise parts of a theory and disregards the ambiguous sections, as only the clearly understood parts of the theory can be converted into a computer program.

Sight word

look-sayinitial sight vocabularyLook say
The dual route theory states that the use of sight words as a reading strategy involves out-of-context memorization rather than the development of phonological skills.

Deep dyslexia

The "Morton and Patterson (dual route) model" is based upon the dual route hypothesis of reading.

Psycholinguistics

psycholinguisticpsycholinguistpsychology of language
Computational modelling, such as the DRC model of reading and word recognition proposed by Max Coltheart and colleagues, is another methodology and refers to the practice of setting up cognitive models in the form of executable computer programs.

Max Coltheart

Prof. Max Coltheart
He is noted for developing the "dual-route" theory of reading ) in the late1970s and the two-factor theory of delusional belief in the 2000s as well as contributions to the debate about what can be learned about cognition from functional neuroimaging work