Dublin

Dublin, IrelandDublin CityCity of DublinDublin city centreBaile Átha CliathWest Dublincounty borough of DublinDublin 1Dublin 15Dublin 2
Dublin is the capital and largest city of Ireland.wikipedia
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Republic of Ireland

IrelandIrishRepublic
Dublin is the capital and largest city of Ireland.
The capital and largest city is Dublin, which is located on the eastern side of the island.

River Liffey

LiffeyLiffey estuaryLiffey River
Situated on a bay on the east coast, at the mouth of the River Liffey, it lies within the province of Leinster. This tidal pool was located where the River Poddle entered the Liffey, on the site of the castle gardens at the rear of Dublin Castle.
The River Liffey (Irish: An Life) is a river in Ireland that flows through the centre of Dublin.

County Dublin

DublinCo. DublinCounty of Dublin
It has an urban area population of 1,173,179, while the population of the Dublin Region (formerly County Dublin) was 1,347,359.
It is in the province of Leinster, and is named after the city of Dublin, the capital city of Ireland.

Kingdom of Dublin

King of DublinDublinKings of Dublin
Later expanded as a Viking settlement, the Kingdom of Dublin, the city became Ireland's principal settlement following the Norman invasion.
Vikings invaded the territory around Dublin in the 9th century, establishing the Norse Kingdom of Dublin, the earliest and longest-lasting Norse kingdom in Ireland.

Dublin Castle

St. Patrick's HallcastleConstable of Dublin Castle
This tidal pool was located where the River Poddle entered the Liffey, on the site of the castle gardens at the rear of Dublin Castle. The Dubhlinn lay where the Castle Garden is now located, opposite the Chester Beatty Library within Dublin Castle.
It is located off Dame Street in Dublin.

River Poddle

Poddle
This tidal pool was located where the River Poddle entered the Liffey, on the site of the castle gardens at the rear of Dublin Castle. The subsequent Scandinavian settlement centred on the River Poddle, a tributary of the Liffey in an area now known as Wood Quay.
The city of Dublin is named after a "dark pool" (dubh linn, in Irish) that was once on its course.

Leinster

Kingdom of Leinsterprovince of LeinsterLaigin
Situated on a bay on the east coast, at the mouth of the River Liffey, it lies within the province of Leinster.
The Gaelic Kingdom of Leinster before 1171, considerably smaller than the present-day province, usually did not include certain territories such as Meath, Osraige or the Viking cities of Wexford and Dublin.

Hurlford

CrookedholmHurlford-Crookedholm
There are other towns of the same name, such as Àth Cliath in East Ayrshire, Scotland, which is anglicised as Hurlford.
It shares its name in Gaelic, Baile Àtha Cliath ("The Ford of the Hurdles") with the Irish capital Dublin.

Chester Beatty Library

Chester Beatty collectionBeattyBeatty MS
The Dubhlinn lay where the Castle Garden is now located, opposite the Chester Beatty Library within Dublin Castle.
The Chester Beatty is a museum and library in Dublin.

Globalization and World Cities Research Network

GaWCGlobalization and World Cities Study Group and NetworkGlobalization and World Rankings Research Institute
the city was listed by the Globalization and World Cities Research Network (GaWC) as a global city, with a ranking of "Alpha −", which places it amongst the top thirty cities in the world.

Whitefriar Street Carmelite Church

Whitefriar St.Whitefriar St. ChurchWhitefriars Street Carmelite Church, Dublin
Baile Átha Cliath was an early Christian monastery, believed to have been in the area of Aungier Street, currently occupied by Whitefriar Street Carmelite Church.
The Whitefriar Street Carmelite Church is a Roman Catholic church in Dublin, Ireland maintained by the Carmelite order.

Father Mathew Bridge

Fr Mathew BridgeFr. MathewFr. Mathew Bridge
The Viking settlement of about 841, Dyflin, and a Gaelic settlement, Áth Cliath ("ford of hurdles") further up river, at the present day Father Mathew Bridge (also known as Dublin Bridge), at the bottom of Church Street.
Father Mathew Bridge is a road bridge spanning the River Liffey in Dublin, Ireland and joining Merchants Quay to Church Street and the north quays.

Wood Quay

The subsequent Scandinavian settlement centred on the River Poddle, a tributary of the Liffey in an area now known as Wood Quay.
Wood Quay is a riverside area of Dublin that was a site of Viking settlement.

Parliament House, Dublin

Irish Houses of ParliamentParliament HouseHouses of Parliament
Dublin grew even more dramatically during the 18th century, with the construction of many new districts and buildings, such as Merrion Square, Parliament House and the Royal Exchange.
Parliament House in Dublin, Ireland, was home to the Parliament of Ireland, and later housed the Bank of Ireland.

Lord Mayor of Dublin

Mayor of DublinLord MayorMayor
Following the appointment of the first Lord Mayor of Dublin in 1229, the city expanded and had a population of 8,000 by the end of the 13th century.
The Lord Mayor of Dublin (Ardmhéara Bhaile Átha Cliath) is the honorary title of the chairman (Cathaoirleach, ) of Dublin City Council which is the local government body for the city of Dublin, the capital of Ireland.

Georgian Dublin

GeorgianDublinGeorgian architecture
As the city continued to prosper during the 18th century, Georgian Dublin became, for a short period, the second largest city of the British Empire and the fifth largest city in Europe, with the population exceeding 130,000.

Dublin Bay

BayDublin Harbour
The area of Dublin Bay has been inhabited by humans since prehistoric times, but the writings of Ptolemy (the Greco-Roman astronomer and cartographer) in about AD 140 provide possibly the earliest reference to a settlement there.
The bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Temple Bar, Dublin

Temple BarTemple Bar DublinTemple Bar West
The vast majority of Dublin's most notable architecture dates from this period – the Four Courts, the Custom House, Temple Bar and Grafton Street are some of the few remaining areas that were not affected by the wave of Georgian reconstruction and maintained their medieval character.
Temple Bar (Barra an Teampaill) is an area on the south bank of the River Liffey in central Dublin, Ireland.

The Pale

PaleEnglish PaleIrish Pale
Dublin was incorporated into the English Crown as the Pale, which was a narrow strip of English settlement along the eastern seaboard.
It had been reduced by the late 15th century to an area along the east coast stretching from Dalkey, south of Dublin, to the garrison town of Dundalk.

Merrion Square

Merrion Square Park4 Merrion Square West89 Merrion Square
Dublin grew even more dramatically during the 18th century, with the construction of many new districts and buildings, such as Merrion Square, Parliament House and the Royal Exchange.
Merrion Square is a Georgian garden square on the southside of Dublin city centre.

Eblana

earliest map of IrelandEblana Civitas
He called it Eblana polis.
It was traditionally believed by scholars to refer to the same site as the modern city of Dublin.

Dublin Corporation

Corporation of DublinCity CorporationCorporation
The Wide Streets Commission was established in 1757 at the request of Dublin Corporation to govern architectural standards on the layout of streets, bridges and buildings.
Dublin Corporation (Bardas Bhaile Átha Cliath), known by generations of Dubliners simply as The Corpo, is the former name given to the city government and its administrative organisation in Dublin between 1661 and 1 January 2002.

The Custom House

Custom HouseCustom House, DublinCustoms House
The vast majority of Dublin's most notable architecture dates from this period – the Four Courts, the Custom House, Temple Bar and Grafton Street are some of the few remaining areas that were not affected by the wave of Georgian reconstruction and maintained their medieval character.
The Custom House (Teach an Chustaim) is a neoclassical 18th century building in Dublin, Ireland which houses the Department of Housing, Planning and Local Government.

Tudor conquest of Ireland

Tudor conquestTudor reconquest of IrelandEnglish rule in Ireland
The Tudor conquest of Ireland in the 16th century spelt a new era for Dublin, with the city enjoying a renewed prominence as the centre of administrative rule in Ireland.
By conciliation and repression the conquest continued for sixty years, until 1603, when the entire country came under the nominal control of James I, exercised through his privy council at Dublin.

Easter Rising

1916 Rising1916 Easter RisingEaster Uprising
The Easter Rising of 1916, the Irish War of Independence, and the subsequent Irish Civil War resulted in a significant amount of physical destruction in central Dublin.
Members of the Irish Volunteers—led by schoolmaster and Irish language activist Patrick Pearse, joined by the smaller Irish Citizen Army of James Connolly and 200 women of Cumann na mBan—seized key locations in Dublin and proclaimed an Irish Republic.