Map of the Lower Rhenish–Westphalian Circle around 1560, Duchy of Jülich highlighted in red
Roer (red) besides other departments in the North of the French Empire, 1811
Nideggen Castle
Map of the Roer departement, circa the early 1800s.
View of Tegelen
Map of the Lower Rhenish–Westphalian Circle around 1560, Duchy of Jülich highlighted in red
Coat of arms of the German municipality of Jülich
map of the Duchy of Jülich-Berg from Theater of the World, or a New Atlas of Maps and Representations of All Regions, edited by Willem and Joan Blaeu, 1645
Flag of (the former municipality of) Tegelen
in 1988

The department was formed from the duchies of Jülich and Cleves, the part of the Archbishopric of Cologne left of the Rhine, the Free City of Aachen, the Prussian part of the duchy of Guelders and some smaller territories.

- Roer (department)

After Napoleon was defeated in 1814, the department was divided between the United Kingdom of the Netherlands (left bank of the Meuse and a strip along its right bank including Gennep, Tegelen and Sittard, in present-day Dutch Limburg) and the Kingdom of Prussia (Province of Jülich-Cleves-Berg, now part of North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany).

- Roer (department)

For centuries Tegelen was part of the Duchy of Jülich, while neighbouring Venlo belonged to the Duchy of Guelders.

- Tegelen

In Napoleonic times, the former duchy of Jülich became part of the Roer department.

- Tegelen

In 1794 Revolutionary France occupied the Duchy of Jülich (Duché de Juliers), which became part of the French département of the Roer.

- Duchy of Jülich

In 1815, following the defeat of Napoleon, the duchy became part of the Prussian Province of Jülich-Cleves-Berg (after 1822 part of the Prussian Rhine Province), except for the cities Sittard and Tegelen, which became part of the United Kingdom of the Netherlands.

- Duchy of Jülich

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