Duke Ferdinand of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel

Prince Ferdinand of Brunswick
Duke Ferdinand of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel
Ferdinand's best known victory the Battle of Minden (1759).
″Ferdinand's Gate″ at the entrance to Vechelde palace garden

German-Prussian field marshal (1758–1766) known for his participation in the Seven Years' War.

- Duke Ferdinand of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel
Prince Ferdinand of Brunswick

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The Battle of Minden, unknown painter

Battle of Minden

Major engagement during the Seven Years' War, fought on 1 August 1759.

Major engagement during the Seven Years' War, fought on 1 August 1759.

The Battle of Minden, unknown painter
The river Weser
A map of the battle.
A memorial from 1859 reminds of the Battle of Minden in the Minden quarter of Todtenhausen

An Anglo-German army under the overall command of Prussian Field Marshal Ferdinand of Brunswick defeated a French army commanded by Marshal of France, Marquis de Contades.

Wolfenbüttel

Town in Lower Saxony, Germany, the administrative capital of Wolfenbüttel District.

Town in Lower Saxony, Germany, the administrative capital of Wolfenbüttel District.

The herb liqueur Jägermeister is distilled in Wolfenbüttel
Wolfenbüttel Park in Kenosha
Elisabeth Christine around 1739
Georg Scholz Self-portrait (undated)
The portal above the entrance to the HAB
The residence of Gotthold Lessing when he was librarian at the HAB
Wolfenbüttel's Zeughaus (former armory) now houses part of the HAB's Exhibitions
Klein-Venedig
Beatae Mariae Virginis
Trinity Church
Fachwerk Häuser, a German style of Timber framing in Wolfenbüttel
Halchter, windmill: Windmühle am Bungenstedter Turm

Duke Ferdinand of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel (1721-1792), Prussian field marshal

Ludwig Ernst van Brunswick-Lüneburg-Bevern

Duke Louis Ernest of Brunswick-Lüneburg

Field-marshal in the armies of the Holy Roman Empire and the Dutch Republic, the elected Duke of Courland (1741).

Field-marshal in the armies of the Holy Roman Empire and the Dutch Republic, the elected Duke of Courland (1741).

Ludwig Ernst van Brunswick-Lüneburg-Bevern
Dutch caricature of the Duke
Ludwig, right, with his Scottish-born successor Robert Douglas, painted in 1786 by Jacobus Vrijmoet

Another brother was Duke Ferdinand of Brunswick who led the Allied Anglo-German army during the Seven Years' War.

Frederick and Charles

Battle of Soor

Battle between Frederick the Great's Prussian army and an Austro-Saxon army led by Prince Charles Alexander of Lorraine during the Second Silesian War (part of the War of the Austrian Succession).

Battle between Frederick the Great's Prussian army and an Austro-Saxon army led by Prince Charles Alexander of Lorraine during the Second Silesian War (part of the War of the Austrian Succession).

Frederick and Charles
Map of the Battle of Soor

A bayonet charge led by Prince Ferdinand of Brunswick seized an Austrian battery, and the surprise attack led to the collapse of the Austrian line.

Battle of Rossbach, unknown artist

Battle of Rossbach

The Battle of Rossbach took place on 5November 1757 during the Third Silesian War (1756–1763, part of the Seven Years' War) near the village of Rossbach (Roßbach), in the Electorate of Saxony.

The Battle of Rossbach took place on 5November 1757 during the Third Silesian War (1756–1763, part of the Seven Years' War) near the village of Rossbach (Roßbach), in the Electorate of Saxony.

Battle of Rossbach, unknown artist
The Allied armies were spread out on the plain in front of Rossbach.
Troops maneuver for position
The Trap is set.
The tower of manor house at Rossbach offered Frederick a vantage point from which to watch the Allied army and to command his troops; from here he also watched Seydlitz's cavalry launch its final attack.
Upon learning that the Austrians had slowly retaken parts of Silesia, Frederick and his troops marched east toward Breslau.
alt=Trees break the horizon of a predominantly flat landscape.|Small copses of trees broke the landscape. (Near Reichardtswerben)
alt=Photograph shows rolling hills.|Gentle elevation changes created little natural cover for troop movements. (Near Branderoda)
alt=Low hills, barely higher than the church's steeple, surround a village.|Thomas Carlyle referred to the hills as negligible.
alt=A river flows through a flat landscape; trees and grasslands border the river.|The Saale flowed past Weissenfels, a few miles southeast of Rossbach.
alt=Square monument with battle details.|Monument at Reichardtswerben
alt=Engraved stone commemorating the battle.|Monument at Rossbach
alt=Rectangular monument with details of ownership of the land on which the battle occurred.|Burgwerben Memorial
alt=Old photograph showing men on horseback standing in a field.|In 1903, the Imperial Army conducted maneuvers on part of the old battlefield.
alt=The original site of the battlefield destroyed by a lignite mine.|In the 19th and 20th centuries, the battlefield site was excavated for lignite, and the terrain destroyed. By the end of the 20th century, the Geiseltal covered the battlefield.
alt=Excavation showing the construction of the lake and swimming park that now covers the battle field and an old pit mine constructed on it.|Panorama of the principal location of the battle today; the old pit mine was flooded, creating the Geiseltal See, now a swimming and recreation area.
alt=Excavation showing the construction of the lake and swimming park, known as the Gieseltal See (Giesel Valley Lake) that now covers the old battle field and an old pit mine constructed on it.|Panorama of the principal location of the battle today

Over the next couple of days, the King's brother, Prince Henry, arrived with the main body of the army and his brother-in-law, Duke Ferdinand of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel, arrived from Magdeburg.

Clockwise from top left:The Battle of Plassey (23 June 1757)

The Battle of Carillon (6–8 July 1758)

The Battle of Zorndorf (25 August 1758)

The Battle of Kunersdorf (12 August 1759)

Seven Years' War

Global conflict between Great Britain and France for global pre-eminence.

Global conflict between Great Britain and France for global pre-eminence.

Clockwise from top left:The Battle of Plassey (23 June 1757)

The Battle of Carillon (6–8 July 1758)

The Battle of Zorndorf (25 August 1758)

The Battle of Kunersdorf (12 August 1759)
Map of the British and French settlements in North America in 1750, before the French and Indian War (1754 to 1763), which was part of the Seven Years' War
Europe in the years after the Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle in 1748
Prussian Leibgarde battalion at Kolín, 1757
British raid on French settlement of Miramichi (later called Burnt Church, New Brunswick), 1758
Battle of Lobositz. Austria: blue; Prussia: red
The Battle of Kolín in 1757 in Bohemia (the site is now in the Czech Republic)
The Battle of Rossbach in Saxony
The Battle of Leuthen in Silesia, by Carl Röchling
Frederick the Great and staff at Leuthen
The Battle of Krefeld in Prussia – a map of the area in The Gentleman's Magazine
The Battle of Hochkirch in Saxony
The Battle of Maxen in Saxony
The Battle of Kunersdorf in Prussia
Battle of Quiberon Bay off Brittany
Battle of Liegnitz (1760) in what is now Poland
Operations of Russian army on Polish–Lithuanian territory, 1756–1763
Siege of Kolberg (1761)
Treaty of Hubertusburg
Under William Pitt the Elder's leadership, Britain's position as the leading colonial power was confirmed by the Seven Years' War.
The Death of General Wolfe (1771), on the Plains of Abraham, near Quebec
The bombardment of Morro Castle on Havana, 1763
The Mughal ambassador to France
August 2009 historical re-enactment of the Battle of Warburg fought on 31 July 1760
Map showing British territorial gains in North America following the Treaty of Paris in pink, and Spanish territorial gains after the Treaty of Fontainebleau in yellow

On the right was a column of about 15,000 men under the command of Prince Ferdinand of Brunswick.

Portrait by Christoph Bernhard Francke

Ferdinand Albert II, Duke of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel

Officer in the army of the Holy Roman Empire.

Officer in the army of the Holy Roman Empire.

Portrait by Christoph Bernhard Francke

5) Ferdinand of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel (12 January 1721 – 3 July 1792) died unmarried.

Battle of Krefeld

Battle of Krefeld

Battle fought at Krefeld near the Rhine on 23 June 1758 between a Prussian-Hanoverian army and a French army during the Seven Years' War.

Battle fought at Krefeld near the Rhine on 23 June 1758 between a Prussian-Hanoverian army and a French army during the Seven Years' War.

Battle of Krefeld
The Battle of Krefeld on a painting by Emil Hünten

The Hanoverian army led by Ferdinand, brother of the duke of Brunswick, had driven the French led by the Comte de Clermont back across the Rhine.

Bataille de Willinghausen, print, Frankfurt 1789

Battle of Villinghausen

Bataille de Willinghausen, print, Frankfurt 1789
Monument to the battle

The Battle of Villinghausen (or Vellinghausen, also known as the Battle of Kirchdenkern) was a battle in the Seven Years' War fought on the 15th and 16 July 1761 in the western area of present-day Germany, between a large French army and a combined Prussian-Hanoverian-British force led by Prince Ferdinand of Brunswick.

Lithograph of the battle

Battle of Lobositz

The opening land battle of the Third Silesian War and the wider Seven Years' War.

The opening land battle of the Third Silesian War and the wider Seven Years' War.

Lithograph of the battle
Map of the Battle of Lobositz. Red is Prussian, blue Austrian army.

This time he withdrew to the village of Wchinitz behind his front line and left command of the battle to Bevern and Prince Ferdinand of Brunswick.