A report on New York City and Duke of York

Arms of the Duke of York
New Amsterdam, centered in the eventual Lower Manhattan, in 1664, the year England took control and renamed it "New York"
Fort George and the City of New York c. 1731. Royal Navy ships of the line are seen guarding what would become New York Harbor.
Columbia University was founded by royal charter in 1754 under the name of King's College.
The Battle of Long Island, the largest battle of the American Revolution, took place in Brooklyn in 1776.
Broadway follows the Native American Wickquasgeck Trail through Manhattan.
The current 5 boroughs of Greater New York as they appeared in 1814. Bronx was in Westchester County, Queens County included modern Nassau County, Kings County had 6 towns, one of which was Brooklyn, New York City is shown by hatching in southern New York County on the island of Manhattan, and Richmond County on Staten Island.
A construction worker atop the Empire State Building as it was being built in 1930. The Chrysler Building is behind him.
Manhattan's Little Italy, Lower East Side, circa 1900
The Stonewall Inn in Greenwich Village, a designated U.S. National Historic Landmark and National Monument, as the site of the June 1969 Stonewall riots and the cradle of the modern gay rights movement
United Airlines Flight 175 hits the South Tower of the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001.
The core of the New York City metropolitan area, with Manhattan Island at its center
Lower and Midtown Manhattan, as seen by a SkySat satellite in 2017
Central Park in Winter by Raymond Speers, in Munsey's Magazine, February 1900
Flushing Meadows–Corona Park was used in both the 1939 and 1964 New York World's Fair, with the Unisphere as the centerpiece of the latter and which remains today.
The Statue of Liberty on Liberty Island in New York Harbor is a symbol of the United States and its ideals of freedom, democracy, and opportunity.
View of The Pond and Midtown Manhattan from the Gapstow Bridge in Central Park, one of the world's most visited tourist attractions, in 2019
California sea lions play at the Bronx Zoo, the world's largest metropolitan zoo.
A map of racial distribution in New York, 2010 U.S. census. Each dot is 25 people:
The landmark Neo-Gothic Roman Catholic St. Patrick's Cathedral, Midtown Manhattan
Ultra-Orthodox Jewish residents in Brooklyn. Brooklyn has the largest Jewish community in the United States, with approximately 600,000 individuals.
The Islamic Cultural Center of New York in Upper Manhattan was the first mosque built in New York City.
Ganesh Temple in Flushing, Queens, is the oldest Hindu temple in the Western Hemisphere.
The New York Stock Exchange, by a significant margin the world's largest stock exchange per market capitalization of its listed companies, at US$23.1 trillion as of April 2018. Pictured is the exchange's building on Wall Street.
The Deutsche Bank Center as viewed from Central Park West
Times Square is the hub of the Broadway theater district and a media center. It also has one of the highest annual attendance rates of any tourist attraction in the world, estimated at 50 million.
The I Love New York logo, designed by Milton Glaser in 1977
Rockefeller Center is home to NBC Studios.
Times Square Studios, home of Good Morning America
Butler Library at Columbia University, described as one of the most beautiful college libraries in the United States
The Washington Square Arch, an unofficial icon of both New York University (NYU) and its Greenwich Village neighborhood
New York-Presbyterian Hospital, affiliated with Columbia University and Cornell University, the largest hospital and largest private employer in New York City and one of the world's busiest
The New York Police Department (NYPD) is the largest police force in the United States.
Police officers of New York Police Department (NYPD)
The Fire Department of New York (FDNY) is the largest municipal fire department in the United States.
The Stephen A. Schwarzman Headquarters Building of the New York Public Library, at 5th Avenue and 42nd Street
The fast-paced streets of New York City, January 2020
Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, part of Museum Mile, is one of the largest museums in the world.
Smorgasburg opened in 2011 as an open-air food market and is part of the Brooklyn Flea.
As of 2012, the city had about 6,000 hybrid taxis (shown) in service, the largest number of any city in North America.
New York City Hall is the oldest City Hall in the United States that still houses its original governmental functions.
The New York County Courthouse houses the New York Supreme Court and other offices.
Eric Adams, the current and 110th Mayor of New York City
New York City is home to the two busiest train stations in the U.S., including Grand Central Terminal.
The New York City Subway is the world's largest rapid transit system by number of stations.
The Port Authority Bus Terminal, the world's busiest bus station, at 8th Avenue and 42nd Street
John F. Kennedy Airport in Queens, the busiest international air passenger gateway to the United States
The Staten Island Ferry shuttles commuters between Manhattan and Staten Island.
Yellow medallion taxicabs are widely recognized icons of the city.
8th Avenue, looking northward ("uptown"). Most streets and avenues in Manhattan's grid plan incorporate a one-way traffic configuration.
The George Washington Bridge, connecting Upper Manhattan (background) from Fort Lee, New Jersey across the Hudson River, is the world's busiest motor vehicle bridge.
The growing skyline of Long Island City, Queens (background),<ref>{{cite web|url=https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-10-30/nyc-s-fastest-growing-neighborhood-gets-180-million-investment|title=NYC's Fastest-Growing Neighborhood Gets $180 Million Investment|first=Henry|last=Goldman|date=October 30, 2018|publisher=Bloomberg L.P|access-date=October 30, 2018}}</ref> facing the East River and Manhattan in May 2017
The Grand Concourse in the Bronx, foreground, with Manhattan in the background in February 2018
St. George, Staten Island as seen from the Staten Island Ferry, the world's busiest passenger-only ferry system, shuttling passengers between Manhattan and Staten Island
The Asia gate entrance to the Bronx Zoo, the world's largest metropolitan zoo.
The Spanish Harlem Orchestra. New York City is home to nearly 3 million Latino Americans, the largest Hispanic population of any city outside Latin America and Spain.
The Financial District of Lower Manhattan including Wall Street, the world's principal financial center

The fifth creation was in favour of James Stuart, the second son of Charles I. New York, its capital Albany, and New York City, were named for this particular Duke of Albany and York.

- Duke of York

In 1664, the city was named in honor of the Duke of York, who would become King James II of England.

- New York City

4 related topics with Alpha

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Portrait by Sir Peter Lely

James II of England

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King of England and Ireland as James II, and King of Scotland as James VII from the death of his elder brother, Charles II, on 6 February 1685.

King of England and Ireland as James II, and King of Scotland as James VII from the death of his elder brother, Charles II, on 6 February 1685.

Portrait by Sir Peter Lely
James with his father, Charles I, by Sir Peter Lely, 1647
Henri de La Tour d'Auvergne, Viscount of Turenne, James's commander in France
James and Anne Hyde in the 1660s, by Sir Peter Lely
James in the 1660s by John Riley
Wedding suit of James II, 1673, in the Victoria and Albert Museum
The Duke of Monmouth was involved in plots against James.
Coronation procession of King James II and Queen Mary, 1685
James portrayed c. 1685 in his role as head of the army, wearing a general officer's state coat
Laurence Hyde, 1st Earl of Rochester, once a supporter of James, turned against him by 1688.
1686 statue of James II by Peter Van Dievoet in Trafalgar Square, London
James's nephew and son-in-law, William of Orange, was invited to "save the Protestant religion".
Louis XIV greeting the exiled James II in 1689 ("La Reception faite au Roy d'Angleterre par le Roy à St. Germain en Laye le VIIe janvier 1689", engraving by Nicolas Langlois, 1690)
Battle of the Boyne between James II and William III, 11 July 1690, Jan van Huchtenburg
The Château de Saint-Germain-en-Laye, James's home during his final exile
Tomb of James II in the parish church of Saint-Germain-en-Laye, commissioned in 1828 by George IV when the church was rebuilt.
James's son was known as "James III and VIII" to his supporters, and "The Old Pretender" to his enemies.
Macaulay wrote in the Whig tradition.
Belloc was a notable apologist for James II.
Half crown coin of James II, 1686

He was designated Duke of York at birth, invested with the Order of the Garter in 1642, and formally created Duke of York in January 1644.

Following its capture by the British, the former Dutch territory of New Netherland and its principal port, New Amsterdam, were named the Province and City of New York in James's honour.

The Castello Plan, a 1660 map of New Amsterdam (the top right corner is roughly north). The fort gave The Battery its name, the large street going from the fort past the wall became Broadway, and the city wall (right) gave Wall Street its name.

New Amsterdam

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17th-century Dutch settlement established at the southern tip of Manhattan Island that served as the seat of the colonial government in New Netherland.

17th-century Dutch settlement established at the southern tip of Manhattan Island that served as the seat of the colonial government in New Netherland.

The Castello Plan, a 1660 map of New Amsterdam (the top right corner is roughly north). The fort gave The Battery its name, the large street going from the fort past the wall became Broadway, and the city wall (right) gave Wall Street its name.
The Rigging House, 120 William St., in 1846; the last remaining building of Dutch New Amsterdam, it was a Methodist church in the 1760s, then a secular building again before its destruction in the mid-19th century.
1882 depiction of the ship Mayflower sailing from England to America in 1620, in Plymouth Harbor
1626 letter in Dutch by Pieter Schaghen stating the purchase of Manhattan for 60 gulden.
A map of the Hudson River Valley c. 1635 (north is to the right)
The First Slave Auction at New Amsterdam in 1655, by Howard Pyle
New Amsterdam in 1664 (looking approximately due north)
The Fall of New Amsterdam
Redraft of the Castello Plan, drawn in 1916
Depiction of the wall of New Amsterdam on a tile in the Wall Street subway station
The 1954 unveiling of a stained-glass depiction of Peter Stuyvesant in Butler Library at Columbia University. It commemorated the 300th anniversary of the founding of New Amsterdam, though it was actually dedicated on its 329th anniversary according to the date on the Seal of New York City, or on the 301st anniversary of the city receiving municipal rights.
The Wyckoff Farm in Flatbush, Brooklyn. Some of its construction still dates from the Dutch period of what is currently New York City.
13–15 South William Street, constructed in the Dutch Colonial Revival architecture evoking New Amsterdam

In 1664, the English took over New Amsterdam and renamed it New York after the Duke of York (later James II & VII).

In June 1665, New Amsterdam was reincorporated under English law as New York City, named after the Duke of York (later King James II).

Province of New York

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British proprietary colony and later royal colony on the northeast coast of North America.

British proprietary colony and later royal colony on the northeast coast of North America.

Map of the Province of New York
The Van Bergen farm, 1733, near Albany, New York
Map of the Province of New York

In 1664, during the Second Anglo-Dutch War, the Dutch Province of New Netherland in America was awarded by Charles II of England to his brother James, Duke of York.

The final evacuation of all of New York by the British Army was followed by the return of General George Washington's Continental Army on November 25, 1783, in a grand parade and celebration.

Hudson River

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315 mi river that flows from north to south primarily through eastern New York in the United States.

315 mi river that flows from north to south primarily through eastern New York in the United States.

The Hudson River Watershed, including the Hudson and Mohawk rivers
The mouth of the Hudson (yellow), located between Jersey City and New York City
The Hudson River flowing out of Henderson Lake in Tahawus
The river from Poughkeepsie, looking north.
The river between Hudson Waterfront in New Jersey (left) and Manhattan (right)
The bulk carrier Nord Angel breaking ice on the Hudson
Robert Havell, Jr., View of the Hudson River from Tarrytown, c. 1866
The Erie Canal in Amsterdam, New York
The George Washington Bridge links Upper Manhattan and Fort Lee, New Jersey
The Hudson Valley Hot-Air Balloon Festival, 2009
US Airways Flight 1549 after landing on the waters of the Hudson River in January 2009
North River by George Bellows, 1908, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts
The Norrie Point Environmental Center in Staatsburg, headquarters of the Hudson River National Estuarine Research Reserve
Debris floating on the river near the World Trade Center, 1973
A juvenile house sparrow by the Hudson River

It originates in the Adirondack Mountains of Upstate New York and flows southward through the Hudson Valley to the Upper New York Bay between New York City and Jersey City, eventually draining into the Atlantic Ocean at New York Harbor.

New Amsterdam and the colony of New Netherland were renamed New York, after the Duke of York.