Dutch East Indies

Netherlands East IndiesDutch IndiesDutchNetherlands IndiesEast IndiesDutch colonial governmentDutch colonial periodDutch colonial eraIndonesiaDutch colonial
The Dutch East Indies (or Netherlands East-Indies; Nederlands(ch)-Indië; Hindia Belanda) was a Dutch colony consisting of what is now Indonesia.wikipedia
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Dutch Empire

DutchDutch coloniesDutch colony
The Dutch East Indies (or Netherlands East-Indies; Nederlands(ch)-Indië; Hindia Belanda) was a Dutch colony consisting of what is now Indonesia.
Dutch chartered companies often dictated that their possessions be kept as confined as possible in order to avoid unnecessary expense, and while some such as the Dutch Cape Colony (modern South Africa) and Dutch East Indies (today's Indonesia) expanded anyway (due to the pressure of independent-minded Dutch colonists), others remained undeveloped, isolated trading centres dependent on an indigenous host-nation.

Netherlands New Guinea

Dutch New GuineaNew GuineaDutch colony
The Netherlands formally recognized Indonesian sovereignty at the 1949 Dutch–Indonesian Round Table Conference with the exception of the Netherlands New Guinea (Western New Guinea), which was ceded to Indonesia 14 years later in 1963 under the provisions of the New York Agreement.
Until 1949 it was a part of the Dutch East Indies.

Batavia, Dutch East Indies

BataviaBatavia/Jakarta Batavia
A capital was established in Batavia (now Jakarta), which became the center of the VOC's Asian trading network.
Batavia, also called Batauia in the city's Malay vernacular, was the capital of the Dutch East Indies.

Jakarta

Jakarta, IndonesiaBataviaDKI Jakarta
A capital was established in Batavia (now Jakarta), which became the center of the VOC's Asian trading network.
It was the de facto capital of the Dutch East Indies when it was known as Batavia.

Western New Guinea

West PapuaIrian JayaPapua
The Netherlands formally recognized Indonesian sovereignty at the 1949 Dutch–Indonesian Round Table Conference with the exception of the Netherlands New Guinea (Western New Guinea), which was ceded to Indonesia 14 years later in 1963 under the provisions of the New York Agreement.
Following its proclamation of independence in 1945, the Republic of Indonesia took over all the former territories of the Dutch East Indies, including Western New Guinea.

Proclamation of Indonesian Independence

Indonesian independenceIndonesian Declaration of IndependenceIndonesia's independence
Following the Japanese surrender in August 1945, Indonesian nationalists declared independence which they fought to secure during the subsequent Indonesian National Revolution.
The newborn sovereign state was de facto formed during a vacuum of power in the former Dutch East Indies following the surrender of Japan in World War II on 15 August.

Indonesia

Republic of IndonesiaIndonesianIndonesian Republic
The Dutch East Indies (or Netherlands East-Indies; Nederlands(ch)-Indië; Hindia Belanda) was a Dutch colony consisting of what is now Indonesia.
Although sometimes interrupted by the Portuguese, French and British, the Dutch were the foremost European power for much of their 350-year presence in the archipelago.

Java

Java IslandJavaneseJava, Indonesia
The company was formally dissolved in 1800 and its colonial possessions in the Indonesian archipelago (including much of Java, parts of Sumatra, much of Maluku, and the hinterlands of ports such as Makasar, Manado, and Kupang) were nationalized under the Dutch Republic as the Dutch East Indies.
It was the centre of powerful Hindu-Buddhist empires, the Islamic sultanates, and the core of the colonial Dutch East Indies.

Invasion of the Spice Islands

again taken by the British in 1810an invasionBritish invasion
In 1811 Daendels was replaced by Governor-General Jan Willem Janssens, but shortly after his arrival British forces occupied several Dutch East Indies ports including the Spice islands in 1810 and Java the following year - Thomas Stamford Raffles became Lieutenant Governor.
The Invasion of the Spice Islands was a military invasion by British forces that took place between February to August 1810 on and around the Dutch owned Maluku Islands (or Moluccas) also known as the Spice Islands in the Dutch East Indies during the Napoleonic wars.

East Indies

IndiesEastEast Indian
Recognising the potential of the East Indies trade, the Dutch government amalgamated the competing companies into the United East India Company (Vereenigde Oost-Indische Compagnie or VOC).
Dutch-occupied colonies in the area were known for about 300 years as the Dutch East Indies before Indonesian independence, while Spanish-occupied colonies were known as the Spanish East Indies before the American conquest and later Philippine independence.

Aceh

Aceh ProvinceAchehAtjeh
Although Java was dominated by the Dutch, many areas remained independent throughout much of this time, including Aceh, Bali, Lombok and Borneo.
Aceh has a history of political independence and resistance to control by outsiders, including the former Dutch colonists and later the Indonesian government.

Bali

Bali, IndonesiaBalineseBali Island
Although Java was dominated by the Dutch, many areas remained independent throughout much of this time, including Aceh, Bali, Lombok and Borneo.
The royal houses are not recognised by the government of Indonesia; however, they originated before Dutch colonisation.

Srivijaya

Srivijaya EmpireSriwijayaSri Vijaya
(The most important were Srivijaya and Majapahit.) The first Europeans to arrive were the Portuguese in 1512.
In the 20th century, both empires were referred to by nationalistic intellectuals to argue for an Indonesian identity within an Indonesian state that had existed prior to the colonial state of the Dutch East Indies.

Kupang

KoepangCoupangCopang
The company was formally dissolved in 1800 and its colonial possessions in the Indonesian archipelago (including much of Java, parts of Sumatra, much of Maluku, and the hinterlands of ports such as Makasar, Manado, and Kupang) were nationalized under the Dutch Republic as the Dutch East Indies.
Kupang was an important port and trading point during the Portuguese and Dutch colonial eras.

Invasion of Java (1811)

invasion of JavaJavaJava Expedition
In 1811 Daendels was replaced by Governor-General Jan Willem Janssens, but shortly after his arrival British forces occupied several Dutch East Indies ports including the Spice islands in 1810 and Java the following year - Thomas Stamford Raffles became Lieutenant Governor.
After the fall of French colonies in the West Indies in 1809 and 1810, and a successful campaign against French possessions in Mauritius in 1810 and 1811, attention turned to the Dutch East Indies.

Sukarno

SoekarnoPresident SukarnoBung Karno
Following the Japanese surrender in August 1945, nationalist leaders Sukarno and Mohammad Hatta declared Indonesian independence.
He was a prominent leader of Indonesia's nationalist movement during the Dutch colonial period and spent over a decade under Dutch detention until released by the invading Japanese forces in World War II.

Dutch–Indonesian Round Table Conference

Dutch-Indonesian Round Table ConferenceRound Table Conferencerecognition of Indonesia
The Netherlands formally recognized Indonesian sovereignty at the 1949 Dutch–Indonesian Round Table Conference with the exception of the Netherlands New Guinea (Western New Guinea), which was ceded to Indonesia 14 years later in 1963 under the provisions of the New York Agreement.
The Dutch who had been expelled in 1942 by the invading Japanese, viewed the Indonesian leadership as Japanese collaborators, and wanted to regain control of their colony.

Japanese occupation of the Dutch East Indies

Japanese occupationJapanese occupation of IndonesiaDutch East Indies
Japan's World War II occupation dismantled much of the Dutch colonial state and economy.
The Japanese Empire occupied the Dutch East Indies, now Indonesia, during World War II from March 1942 until after the end of the war in September 1945.

Mohammad Hatta

HattaMuhammad HattaMohammed Hatta
Following the Japanese surrender in August 1945, nationalist leaders Sukarno and Mohammad Hatta declared Indonesian independence.
Known as "The Proclamator", he and a number of Indonesians, including the first president of Indonesia, Sukarno, fought for the independence of Indonesia from the Dutch.

New York Agreement

transfertransferred to Indonesia
The Netherlands formally recognized Indonesian sovereignty at the 1949 Dutch–Indonesian Round Table Conference with the exception of the Netherlands New Guinea (Western New Guinea), which was ceded to Indonesia 14 years later in 1963 under the provisions of the New York Agreement.
From 1951, the Indonesian government interpreted the results of the Round Table Conference as giving it sovereignty over all of the former Dutch East Indies, including New Guinea.

Stamford Raffles

Sir Stamford RafflesRafflesThomas Stamford Raffles
In 1811 Daendels was replaced by Governor-General Jan Willem Janssens, but shortly after his arrival British forces occupied several Dutch East Indies ports including the Spice islands in 1810 and Java the following year - Thomas Stamford Raffles became Lieutenant Governor.
He mounted a military expedition against the Dutch and French in Java, in the Dutch East Indies.

Palembang

Palembang, IndonesiaPalembang, South SumatraPalembangese
Other rulers including the Sultans of Tidore in Maluku, Pontianak (Kalimantan), and Palembang in Sumatra, requested Dutch protection from independent neighbours thereby avoiding Dutch military conquest and were able to negotiate better conditions under colonial rule.
Palembang was incorporated into the Dutch East Indies in 1825 after the abolishment of the Palembang Sultanate.

Jan Willem Janssens

JanssensGen. J.W. JanssensGeneral Janssens
In 1811 Daendels was replaced by Governor-General Jan Willem Janssens, but shortly after his arrival British forces occupied several Dutch East Indies ports including the Spice islands in 1810 and Java the following year - Thomas Stamford Raffles became Lieutenant Governor.
Jonkheer Jan Willem Janssens GCMWO (12 October 1762 – 23 May 1838) was a Dutch nobleman, soldier and statesman who served both as the governor of the Cape Colony and governor-general of the Dutch East Indies.

Netherlands

DutchThe NetherlandsHolland
The Netherlands formally recognized Indonesian sovereignty at the 1949 Dutch–Indonesian Round Table Conference with the exception of the Netherlands New Guinea (Western New Guinea), which was ceded to Indonesia 14 years later in 1963 under the provisions of the New York Agreement.
In Asia, the Dutch established the Dutch East Indies (now Indonesia), and the only western trading post in Japan, Dejima.

Dutch intervention in Lombok and Karangasem

annexedmilitary expedition against the Cakranegara royal housecame under Dutch control
However, the island of Lombok came under Dutch control in 1894, and Batak resistance in northern Sumatra was quashed in 1895.
The Dutch intervention in Lombok and Karangasem took place in 1894, and is part of the string of Dutch interventions in and around Bali, Dutch East Indies (now: Indonesia), that led to complete colonization of both Bali and Lombok by the early 20th century.