Dutch Gold Coast

Gold CoastDutchDutch GuineaDutch colonial outposts(Dutch) Gold CoastDutch colonial rule on the Gold CoastDutch colonization of the Gold CoastDutch presence on the Gold CoastGuineaNetherlands
The Dutch Gold Coast or Dutch Guinea, officially Dutch possessions on the Coast of Guinea (Dutch: Nederlandse Bezittingen ter Kuste van Guinea) was a portion of contemporary Ghana that was gradually colonized by the Dutch, beginning in 1598.wikipedia
296 Related Articles

Ghana

GhanaianRepublic of GhanaGHA
The Dutch Gold Coast or Dutch Guinea, officially Dutch possessions on the Coast of Guinea (Dutch: Nederlandse Bezittingen ter Kuste van Guinea) was a portion of contemporary Ghana that was gradually colonized by the Dutch, beginning in 1598.
By 1598, the Dutch had joined the Portuguese in the gold trade, establishing the Dutch Gold Coast (Nederlandse Bezittingen ter Kuste van Guinea) and building forts at Fort Komenda and Kormantsi.

Fort Nassau, Ghana

Fort NassauFort Nassau (Ghana)Nassau
In 1612, after gaining permission of the local rulers through the Treaty of Asebu, he built Fort Nassau near Moree, on the site of an original Dutch trading post that had been burned down by the Portuguese.
Fort Nassau, near Moree, Ghana, was the first fort that the Dutch established on what would become the Dutch Gold Coast.

Gold Coast (British colony)

Gold CoastGold Coast ColonyBritish Gold Coast
Whereas Swedish presence on the Gold Coast turned out to be only temporary, British and Danish settlement in the area proved to be permanent.
They purchased and incorporated the Danish Gold Coast in 1850 and the Dutch Gold Coast, including Fort Elmina, in 1872.

Portuguese Gold Coast

Gold CoastSao Jorge da MinaCoast of the Mine
The Portuguese position on the Gold Coast, known as Portuguese Gold Coast, remained secure for over a century.
On 9 January 1642 the whole colony was ceded to the Dutch, who made it part of their Dutch Gold Coast colony.

Ashanti Empire

Ashanti ConfederacyAshantiKingdom of Ashanti
After the Battle of Feyiase (1701), the Ashanti Empire replaced the Denkyira as the dominant power, and the Dutch began paying tribute to the Ashanti instead.
In 1701, the Ashanti army conquered Denkyira, giving the Ashanti access to the Gulf of Guinea and the Atlantic Ocean coastal trade with Europeans, notably the Dutch.

Fort Saint Anthony

Fort Santo AntonioFort St. AnthonyFort St Anthony
Fort San Sebastian at Shama and Fort Santo Antonio at Axim followed in 1640 and 1642 respectively.
In 1642, the Dutch captured the fort and subsequently made it part of the Dutch Gold Coast.

Fort Batenstein

After the Dutch managed to dislodge the Swedes from Butre and began building Fort Batenstein at that site, the leaders of the Dutch West India Company thought it beneficial to negotiate a treaty with the local political leadership in order to establish a peaceful long-term relationship in the area.
Fort Batenstein was a fort and trading post established by the Dutch on the Gold Coast in 1656.

Barent Eriksz

After Barent Eriksz successfully sailed to the Gold Coast in 1591, Dutch merchants began trading in the area.
Barent Eriksz (also known as Barent Erickzen and Bernard Ericks) was a Dutch trader from Medemblik, who is considered the initiator of Dutch trade with the Gold Coast in Africa.

Treaty of Butre

Treaty of Butre (1656)
The local Ahanta leaders found it equally beneficial to enter into such an agreement, and thus on 27 August 1656, the Treaty of Butre was signed.
The Treaty of Butre between the Netherlands and Ahanta was signed at Butre (historical spelling: Boutry), Dutch Gold Coast on 27 August 1656.

Axim

Axim, GhanaPortuguese Gold Coast
Fort San Sebastian at Shama and Fort Santo Antonio at Axim followed in 1640 and 1642 respectively.
Between 1642 and 1872, the fort was expanded and altered by the Dutch, who "ruled" during that period.

Gold Coast (region)

Gold CoastGold Coast regionthe Gold Coast
By 1471, they had reached the area that was to become known as the Gold Coast because it was an important source of gold.
The Dutch arrived in 1598 and in 1642 incorporated the Portuguese territory into the Dutch Gold Coast.

Shirley's Gold Coast expedition

Shirley launched an unsuccessful attackBattle of Fort Elmina (1782)attempt to capture
On 18 February 1782, as part of the Fourth Anglo-Dutch War, the British attacked Elmina.
As part of its offensive strategy, the British organized an expedition against Dutch colonial outposts on the Gold Coast of Africa (present-day Ghana).

Dutch West India Company

Dutch West Indies CompanyWICWest India Company
After the Twelve Years's Truce ended in 1621, the Dutch West India Company was established, which tried to seize the Portuguese colonies in Africa and America as part of the Groot Desseyn plan.
In 1612, a Dutch fortress was built in Mouree (present day Ghana), along the Dutch Gold Coast.

Treaty of Asebu

sign a treaty
In 1612, after gaining permission of the local rulers through the Treaty of Asebu, he built Fort Nassau near Moree, on the site of an original Dutch trading post that had been burned down by the Portuguese.
The treaty was the first among several concluded between the Dutch and the peoples of the Gold Coast, and marked the beginning of a 260-year period of Dutch presence on the Gold Coast.

Pieter de Marees

Pieter de Marees's publications greatly increased the interest of merchants in the region.
Pieter de Marees was a Dutch trader and explorer who is notable for writing an extensive report about his trip to the Gold Coast in 1602.

Anglo-Dutch Gold Coast Treaty (1867)

Anglo-Dutch Gold Coast Treatya large trade of forts between Britain and the NetherlandsConvention between Great Britain and the Netherlands for an Interchange of Territory on the Gold Coast of Africa
In 1867, the Convention between Great Britain and the Netherlands for an Interchange of Territory on the Gold Coast of Africa was signed, in which all Dutch forts to the east of Elmina were handed over to Britain, while the British forts west of Elmina were handed over to the Netherlands.
The Anglo-Dutch Gold Coast Treaty of 1867 redistributed forts along the Dutch and British Gold Coasts in order to concentrate the parties' areas of influence.

Cornelis Nagtglas

Cornelis Johannes Marius Nagtglas
The Dutch governor of Elmina, Cornelis Nagtglas, tried to persuade the Elminese to relinquish their city to the British.
Cornelis Johannes Marius Nagtglas (16 May 1814 – 19 January 1897) was a Dutch politician and civil servant, who made a career in the administration on the Dutch Gold Coast.

Groot Desseyn

Grand Design
After the Twelve Years's Truce ended in 1621, the Dutch West India Company was established, which tried to seize the Portuguese colonies in Africa and America as part of the Groot Desseyn plan.
The Dutch would still succeed in their original Groot Desseyn attempt in 1637 by conquering both the previous two targets and much of the nearby lands; the rich West African (Dutch) Gold Coast and Brazilian New Holland included.

Dutch language

DutchDutch-languagenl
The Dutch Gold Coast or Dutch Guinea, officially Dutch possessions on the Coast of Guinea (Dutch: Nederlandse Bezittingen ter Kuste van Guinea) was a portion of contemporary Ghana that was gradually colonized by the Dutch, beginning in 1598.
The Dutch colonial presence elsewhere in Africa, notably Dutch Gold Coast, was too ephemeral not to be wiped out by prevailing colonizing European successors.

Belanda Hitam

Zwarte HollandersAfrican IndonesiansAshanti recruits
This recruitment of the so-called Belanda Hitam (Indonesian for "Black Dutchmen") started in 1831 as an emergency measure as the Dutch army lost thousands of European soldiers and a much larger number of "native" soldiers in the Java War (1825–1830), and at the same time saw its own population base diminished by the independence of Belgium (1830).
Between 1831 and 1872, over three thousand Africans were recruited from the Dutch Gold Coast for service as colonial troops in the Dutch East Indies.

Dutch–Ahanta War

rebelled against the Dutch governmentAhanta insurrectionAhanta War
When the Dutch decided to recruit soldiers for the Dutch East Indies Army in 1836, the government was strengthened again, something which was reinforced in the wake of the destastrous Ahanta War of 1838.
Beginning with a mere economic dispute between the Ahanta and the Dutch, who were based at the Dutch Gold Coast, the conflict ended with the hanging of Ahanta king Badu Bonsu II and the reorganization of the Ahanta state, establishing a Dutch protectorate over the Ahanta.

Moree, Ghana

MoreeMouriMouree
In 1612, after gaining permission of the local rulers through the Treaty of Asebu, he built Fort Nassau near Moree, on the site of an original Dutch trading post that had been burned down by the Portuguese.
Moree developed around Fort Nassau, which was the original fort on their Gold Coast taken over by the Dutch West India Company when this was founded in 1621.

Fort San Sebastian

Fort San Sebastian wreck
Fort San Sebastian at Shama and Fort Santo Antonio at Axim followed in 1640 and 1642 respectively.
The fort was ceded with the entire Dutch Gold Coast to Britain in 1872.

Colony

coloniescolonialcolonized
Daendels tried to redevelop the rather dilapidated Dutch possessions as an African plantation colony driven by legitimate trade.

Brandenburger Gold Coast

Groß FriedrichsburgPrussian Gold CoastBrandenburg African Company
In addition, Brandenburgers also had forts in the area from 1682 onwards, until they were bought out by the Dutch in 1717.
In 1721 the rights to the colony were sold to the Dutch, who renamed it Hollandia, as part of their larger Dutch Gold Coast colony.