Dvin (ancient city)

DvinDuinDwincathedral of Dvin
Dvin (Դուին, Դվին; Δούβιος, or Τίβιον, ; دبيل; also Duin or Dwin in ancient sources) was a large commercial city and the capital of early medieval Armenia.wikipedia
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Yerevan

ErivanYerevan, ArmeniaErevan
It was situated north of the previous ancient capital of Armenia, the city of Artaxata, along the banks of the Metsamor River, 35 km to the south of modern Yerevan.
Under the rule of the Arsacid dynasty of Armenia (54–428 AD), many other cities around Erebuni including Vagharshapat and Dvin flourished.

Armenia

ArmenianRepublic of ArmeniaARM
Dvin (Դուին, Դվին; Δούβιος, or Τίβιον, ; دبيل; also Duin or Dwin in ancient sources) was a large commercial city and the capital of early medieval Armenia.
It was part of the administrative division/emirate Arminiya created by the Arabs, which also included parts of Georgia and Caucasian Albania, and had its centre in the Armenian city, Dvin.

Historical capitals of Armenia

capital13 historic capitals of Armenia12thCapital
Dvin (Դուին, Դվին; Δούβιος, or Τίβιον, ; دبيل; also Duin or Dwin in ancient sources) was a large commercial city and the capital of early medieval Armenia.

Sasanian Empire

SassanidSasanianSassanid Empire
After the fall of the Armenian Kingdom in 428, Dvin became the residence of Sassanid appointed marzpans (governors), Byzantine kouropalates and later Umayyad- and Abbasid-appointed ostikans (governors).
A year earlier, the Sassanid governor of Armenia, Chihor-Vishnasp of the Suren family, built a fire temple at Dvin near modern Yerevan, and he put to death an influential member of the Mamikonian family, touching off a revolt which led to the massacre of the Persian governor and his guard in 571, while rebellion also broke out in Iberia.

Arminiya

ArmeniaEmirate of Armeniapresiding prince of Armenia
Dvin became the center of the province of Arminiya, the Arabs called the city Dabil.
Though the caliphs initially permitted an Armenian prince to represent the province of Arminiya in exchange for tribute and the Armenians' loyalty during times of war, Caliph Abd al-Malik ibn Marwan introduced direct Arab rule of the region, headed by an ostikan with his capital in Dvin.

893 Dvin earthquake

893 earthquake in Dvin893-12-27destroys
During a major earthquake in 893, the city was destroyed, along with most of its 70,000 inhabitants.
It destroyed the city of Dvin in Armenia, causing approximately 30,000 casualties.

Verin Dvin

The site of the ancient city is currently not much more than a large hill located between modern Hnaberd (just off the main road through Hnaberd) and Verin Dvin, Armenia.
The village is built near the ruins of the ancient city of Dvin.

Shaddadids

ShaddadidShaddadid dynastyShadaddid control
Following a devastating Daylamite raid in 1021, which sacked the city, Dvin was captured by the Shaddadids of Ganja, and ruled by Abu'l-Aswar Shavur ibn Fadl, who successfully defended it against three Byzantine attacks in the latter half of the 1040s.
They were established in Dvin.

Abu'l-Aswar Shavur ibn Fadl

Abu'l-Asvar Shavur IAbu'l-Aswar ShavurAbu-l-Aswar Shavur I bin al-Fadl I
Following a devastating Daylamite raid in 1021, which sacked the city, Dvin was captured by the Shaddadids of Ganja, and ruled by Abu'l-Aswar Shavur ibn Fadl, who successfully defended it against three Byzantine attacks in the latter half of the 1040s.
Prior to that, he ruled the city of Dvin (in what is now Armenia and northeastern Turkey) from 1022 as an autonomous lord.

Artaxata

ArtashatArtashat (ancient city)ancient city of Artashat
It was situated north of the previous ancient capital of Armenia, the city of Artaxata, along the banks of the Metsamor River, 35 km to the south of modern Yerevan.
However, after losing its status as a capital to Vagharshapat and later Dvin, Artashat gradually lost its significance.

Sasanian Armenia

Persian ArmeniaArmeniaMarzpanate Armenia
Its prosperity continued even after the partition of Armenia between Romans and Sassanid Persians, when it became the provincial capital of Persian Armenia, and eventually it became a target during the height of the Muslim conquests.
813 of these coins were found in 34 regions in Armenia; being most of them found in Dvin (ancient city) and Gyumri.

Kingdom of Armenia (antiquity)

ArmeniaKingdom of ArmeniaGreater Armenia
After the fall of the Armenian Kingdom in 428, Dvin became the residence of Sassanid appointed marzpans (governors), Byzantine kouropalates and later Umayyad- and Abbasid-appointed ostikans (governors).

Najm ad-Din Ayyub

Ayyubhis fatherNajm ad-Din Ayyub ibn Shadhi
Dvin was the birthplace of Najm ad-Din Ayyub and Asad ad-Din Shirkuh bin Shadhi, Kurdish generals in the service of the Seljuks; Najm ad-Din Ayyub's son, Saladin, was the founder of the Ayyubid dynasty.
al-Malik al-Afdal Najm ad-Din Ayyub ibn Shadhi ibn Marwan (Arabic: الملك ألأفضل نجم الدين أيوب بن شاﺬي بن مروان) (died August 9, 1173) was a Kurdish soldier and politician from Dvin, and the father of Saladin.

Muslim conquest of Armenia

Arab conquest of ArmeniaArmeniaconquest of Armenia
During the Arab conquest of Armenia, Dvin was captured and pillaged in 640, in the first raids.
He then turned towards Lake Van, where the local Armenian princes of Akhlat and Moks submitted, allowing Habib to march onto Dvin, the capital of the former Persian portion of Armenia.

Ayyubid dynasty

AyyubidAyyubidsAyyubid Sultanate
Dvin was the birthplace of Najm ad-Din Ayyub and Asad ad-Din Shirkuh bin Shadhi, Kurdish generals in the service of the Seljuks; Najm ad-Din Ayyub's son, Saladin, was the founder of the Ayyubid dynasty.
Ayyub's ancestors settled in the town of Dvin, in northern Armenia.

Hovhannes Draskhanakerttsi

John V the HistorianHovannes DraskhanakertsiHovhanes Draskhanakertsi
According to Sebeos and Catholicos John V the Historian, Dvin was captured in 640 during the reign of Constans II and Catholicos Ezra.
After returning the Catholicosate to Dvin since it had been reclaimed from the Arabs, he moved it again to Vaspurakan around 924.

Saladin

Salah ad-DinSaladdinSalah ad-Din (Saladin)
Dvin was the birthplace of Najm ad-Din Ayyub and Asad ad-Din Shirkuh bin Shadhi, Kurdish generals in the service of the Seljuks; Najm ad-Din Ayyub's son, Saladin, was the founder of the Ayyubid dynasty.
His family was most likely of Kurdish ancestry, and had originated from the village of Ajdanakan near the city of Dvin in central Armenia.

Shirkuh

Asad ad-Din ShirkuhAsad ad-DinAsad al-Din Shirkuh
Dvin was the birthplace of Najm ad-Din Ayyub and Asad ad-Din Shirkuh bin Shadhi, Kurdish generals in the service of the Seljuks; Najm ad-Din Ayyub's son, Saladin, was the founder of the Ayyubid dynasty.
He was originally from a Kurdish village in Armenia near the town of Dvin.

George III of Georgia

George IIIGiorgi IIIGiorgi
The Shaddadids continued to rule the city as Seljuk vassals until the Georgian King George III conquered the city in 1173.
The capture of Ani and the defeat of the Saltukid-forces enabled the Georgian king to march on Dvin.

Tamar of Georgia

Queen TamarTamarTamar the Great
In 1201-1203, during the reign of Queen Tamar, the city was again under Georgian rule.
Exploiting her success in this battle, between 1203–1205 Georgians seized the town of Dvin and entered Ahlatshah possessions twice and subdued the emir of Kars (vassal of the Saltukids in Erzurum), Ahlatshahs, the emirs of Erzurum and Erzincan.

Ararat Province

AraratArarat RegionArarat (province)
Two former capitals of Armenia are located in the modern-day Ararat Province, Artaxata and Dvin.

Dvin, Armenia

DvinNerkin Dvinvillage of the same name
It is located near the ruins of the ancient city of Dvin.

Khosrov III the Small

Khosrov IIIKhosrov III KotakKhosrov Kotak
The ancient city of Dvin was built by Khosrov III Kotak in 335 on a site of an ancient settlement and fortress from the 3rd millennium BC.
He founded a hunting ground (which was named after him) and the city of Dvin, which later became the Armenian capital.

Zacharias I of Armenia

Zacharias I
*Zacharias I of Armenia
During his reign a severe earthquake rocked Dvin, during which Zacharias offered powerful prayers.

Early Middle Ages

early medievalEarlyearly medieval period
Dvin (Դուին, Դվին; Δούβιος, or Τίβιον, ; دبيل; also Duin or Dwin in ancient sources) was a large commercial city and the capital of early medieval Armenia.