Dysthymia

chronic depressiondysthymic disorderdysthymicpersistent depressive disorderchronicdepresseddepressiondysthymic disorder (now pervasive depressive disorder in DSM-5),mild depressionNeurotic depression
Dysthymia, also known as persistent depressive disorder (PDD), is a mood disorder consisting of the same cognitive and physical problems as depression, with less severe but longer-lasting symptoms.wikipedia
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Mood disorder

depressionmood disordersdepressive disorder
Dysthymia, also known as persistent depressive disorder (PDD), is a mood disorder consisting of the same cognitive and physical problems as depression, with less severe but longer-lasting symptoms.
There are several sub-types of depressive disorders or psychiatric syndromes featuring less severe symptoms such as dysthymic disorder (similar to but milder than MDD) and cyclothymic disorder (similar to but milder than BD).

Major depressive disorder

depressionclinical depressionmajor depression
Dysthymia, also known as persistent depressive disorder (PDD), is a mood disorder consisting of the same cognitive and physical problems as depression, with less severe but longer-lasting symptoms. Dysthymia is less acute and severe than major depressive disorder.
It was a split of the previous depressive neurosis in the DSM-II, which also encompassed the conditions now known as dysthymia and adjustment disorder with depressed mood.

DSM-5

DSM-Vmental health disordersDiagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
In the DSM-5, dysthymia is replaced by persistent depressive disorder.

Mental disorder

mental illnessnervous breakdownmentally ill
Dysthymia often co-occurs with other mental disorders.
Milder but still prolonged depression can be diagnosed as dysthymia.

Major depressive episode

depressive episodedepressionmajor depressive episodes
Up to 25% of people who experience a major depressive episode have a pre-existing dysthymic disorder.

Tricyclic antidepressant

tricyclic antidepressantsTCAsTCA
The first line of pharmacotherapy is usually SSRIs due to their purported more tolerable nature and reduced side effects compared to the irreversible monoamine oxidase inhibitors or tricyclic antidepressants.
The TCAs are used primarily in the clinical treatment of mood disorders such as major depressive disorder (MDD), dysthymia, and treatment-resistant variants.

Monoamine oxidase inhibitor

MAOImonoamine oxidase inhibitorsMAOIs
The first line of pharmacotherapy is usually SSRIs due to their purported more tolerable nature and reduced side effects compared to the irreversible monoamine oxidase inhibitors or tricyclic antidepressants.
RIMAs are used clinically in the treatment of depression and dysthymia.

Amisulpride

Tentative evidence supports the use of amisulpride to treat dysthymia but with increased side effects.
It is also used to treat dysthymia.

Citalopram

CelexaCipramilTalohexal
The most commonly prescribed antidepressants/SSRIs for dysthymia are escitalopram, citalopram, sertraline, fluoxetine, paroxetine, and fluvoxamine.
Citalopram may be used off-label to treat anxiety, and dysthymia, premenstrual dysphoric disorder, body dysmorphic disorder, and obsessive–compulsive disorder.

Generalized anxiety disorder

general anxiety disordergeneralized anxietyanxiety
It is vital to look for signs of major depression, panic disorder, generalised anxiety disorder, alcohol and substance misuse and personality disorder.
However, dysthymia is the most prevalent comorbid diagnosis of GAD clients.

Panic disorder

panicpanic disorderspanic disorde
It is vital to look for signs of major depression, panic disorder, generalised anxiety disorder, alcohol and substance misuse and personality disorder.
Within the sample, adolescents were found to have the following comorbid disorders: major depressive disorder (80%), dysthymic disorder (40%), generalized anxiety disorder (40%), somatoform disorders (40%), substance abuse (40%), and specific phobia (20%).

Fluoxetine

ProzacProzakSarafem
The most commonly prescribed antidepressants/SSRIs for dysthymia are escitalopram, citalopram, sertraline, fluoxetine, paroxetine, and fluvoxamine.
Both the NICE and the Fournier analyses concluded that greater evidence is seen for the efficacy of antidepressants in the treatment of chronic mild depression (dysthymia) than in recent-onset mild depression.

Seasonal affective disorder

winter bluesseasonal depressionSAD
Additionally, if the person also suffers from seasonal affective disorder, light therapy can be useful in helping augment therapeutic effects.
The symptoms of it mimic those of dysthymia or even major depressive disorder.

Atypical depression

Depression
Atypical depression as it has been known in the DSM IV, is depression that shares many of the typical symptoms of the psychiatric syndromes of major depression or dysthymia but is characterized by improved mood in response to positive events.

Double depression

Double depression refers to the co-existence of major depressive disorder (MDD) and persistent depressive disorder (PDD), (the latter was previously referred to as dysthymia).

Depression (mood)

depressiondepressedmelancholy
Depressed mood is a symptom of some mood disorders such as major depressive disorder or dysthymia; it is a normal temporary reaction to life events, such as the loss of a loved one; and it is also a symptom of some physical diseases and a side effect of some drugs and medical treatments.

Substance abuse

drug abusedrug useabuse
Cannabis may trigger panic attacks during intoxication and with continued use, it may cause a state similar to dysthymia.

Paroxetine

PaxilSeroxatparoxetine hydrochloride
The most commonly prescribed antidepressants/SSRIs for dysthymia are escitalopram, citalopram, sertraline, fluoxetine, paroxetine, and fluvoxamine.
Although the evidence is conflicting, paroxetine may be effective for the treatment of dysthymia, a chronic disorder involving depressive symptoms for most days of the year.

Anhedonia

anhedonicinability to experience pleasurelack of deriving enjoyment
Blanchard and colleagues (2011) found individuals with social anhedonia also had elevated rates of lifetime mood disorders including depression and dysthymia compared to controls.

Robert Spitzer (psychiatrist)

Robert SpitzerRobert L. Spitzer
The concept was coined by Robert Spitzer as a replacement for the term "depressive personality" in the late 1970s.

Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders

DSM-IVDSM-IV-TRDSM
In the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV), dysthymia is a serious state of chronic depression, which persists for at least two years (one year for children and adolescents).

Acute (medicine)

acutesubacuteacute disease
Dysthymia is less acute and severe than major depressive disorder.

Ancient Greek

GreekClassical GreekGr.
The term is from Ancient Greek δυσθυμία, meaning bad state of mind.

Insomnia

trouble sleepingsleeplessnessdifficulty sleeping
Dysthymia characteristics include an extended period of depressed mood combined with at least two other symptoms which may include insomnia or hypersomnia, fatigue or low energy, eating changes (more or less), low self-esteem, or feelings of hopelessness.