E-textiles

smart textileselectronic textilesmart fabricsmart fabricssmart textileintelligent textiles
Electronic textiles, also known as smart garments, smart clothing, smart textiles, or smart fabrics, are fabrics that enable digital components such as a battery and a light (including small computers), and electronics to be embedded in them.wikipedia
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Wearable computer

wearable computingwearableswearable
Many smart clothing, wearable technology, and wearable computing projects involve the use of e-textiles. In the mid 1990s a team of MIT researchers led by Steve Mann, Thad Starner, and Sandy Pentland began to develop what they termed wearable computers.
electronic textiles and fashion design, e.g. Microsoft's 2011 prototype "The Printing Dress".

Textile

textilesfabriccloth
Electronic textiles, also known as smart garments, smart clothing, smart textiles, or smart fabrics, are fabrics that enable digital components such as a battery and a light (including small computers), and electronics to be embedded in them.
Smart textiles

Wearable technology

wearablewearable devicewearable devices
Many smart clothing, wearable technology, and wearable computing projects involve the use of e-textiles.
E-textiles

Hexoskin

Hexoskin
Hexoskin embeds physiological sensors in smart textiles materials, and is a connected object in the sense of the Internet of things concept.

Heart rate monitor

heart monitorheart rate monitorsheart rate sensor
Heart rate monitor
E-textiles

Digital electronics

digital circuitdigitaldigital technology
Electronic textiles, also known as smart garments, smart clothing, smart textiles, or smart fabrics, are fabrics that enable digital components such as a battery and a light (including small computers), and electronics to be embedded in them.

Computer

computerscomputer systemdigital computer
Electronic textiles, also known as smart garments, smart clothing, smart textiles, or smart fabrics, are fabrics that enable digital components such as a battery and a light (including small computers), and electronics to be embedded in them.

Elizabeth I of England

Elizabeth IQueen Elizabeth IQueen Elizabeth
Many of Queen Elizabeth I's gowns, for example, were embroidered with gold-wrapped threads.

Goldwork (embroidery)

goldworkgold threadgold and silver thread
Many of Queen Elizabeth I's gowns, for example, were embroidered with gold-wrapped threads.

Electroluminescence

electroluminescentELelectroluminescent panel
Particularly noteworthy in this collection was the work of Diana Dew, a designer who created a line of electronic fashion, including electroluminescent party dresses and belts that could sound alarm sirens.

Identification friend or foe

IFFidentification, friend or foeidentification friend or foe (IFF)
Additional smart fabric technologies were unveiled by Wainwright at two Flextech Flexible Display conferences held in Phoenix, AZ, showing infrared digital displays machine-embedded into fabrics for IFF (Identification of Friend or Foe) which were submitted to BAE Systems for evaluation in 2006 and won an "Honorable Mention" award from NASA in 2010 on their Tech Briefs, "Design the Future" contest.

Steve Mann

Prof. Steve MannSteve Mann’sSteven Mann
In the mid 1990s a team of MIT researchers led by Steve Mann, Thad Starner, and Sandy Pentland began to develop what they termed wearable computers.

Thad Starner

In the mid 1990s a team of MIT researchers led by Steve Mann, Thad Starner, and Sandy Pentland began to develop what they termed wearable computers.

Alex Pentland

Alex "Sandy" PentlandSandy PentlandAlex (Sandy) Pentland
In the mid 1990s a team of MIT researchers led by Steve Mann, Thad Starner, and Sandy Pentland began to develop what they termed wearable computers.

Cotton

cotton woolcotton industrycotton fiber
Printed sensors for both physiological and environmental monitoring have been integrated into textiles including cotton, Gore-Tex, and neoprene.

Gore-Tex

GoreGortexteflon-coated
Printed sensors for both physiological and environmental monitoring have been integrated into textiles including cotton, Gore-Tex, and neoprene.

Neoprene

polychloropreneneoprene rubberChloroprene Rubber
Printed sensors for both physiological and environmental monitoring have been integrated into textiles including cotton, Gore-Tex, and neoprene.

Integrated circuit

integrated circuitsmicrochipchip
E-textiles with classical electronic devices such as conductors, integrated circuits, LEDs, OLEDs and conventional batteries embedded into garments.

Light-emitting diode

LEDLEDslight emitting diodes
E-textiles with classical electronic devices such as conductors, integrated circuits, LEDs, OLEDs and conventional batteries embedded into garments.

Conductive textile

conductive fiberelectrically conductive fabric
Just as in classical electronics, the construction of electronic capabilities on textile fibers requires the use of conducting and semi-conducting materials such as a conductive textile.
E-textiles

Metallic fiber

metal threadmetallicMetallic fibers
There are a number of commercial fibers today that include metallic fibers mixed with textile fibers to form conducting fibers that can be woven or sewn.

Semiconductor

semiconductorssemiconductingsemiconductor material
However, because both metals and classical semiconductors are stiff material, they are not very suitable for textile fiber applications, since fibers are subjected to much stretch and bending during use.

Organic electronics

plastic electronicsorganic electronicorganic
A new class of electronic materials that are more suitable for e-textiles is the class of organic electronics materials, because they can be conducting, as well as semiconducting, and designed as inks and plastics.

Monitoring (medicine)

monitoringmonitormonitored
Health monitoring of vital signs such as heart rate, respiration rate, temperature, activity, and posture.