Earl Marshal

Lord MarshalMarshal of EnglandEarl Marshal of EnglandEarl Marshal of the United KingdomLord Marshal of EnglandEarls MarshalLord MarshallCountess MarshalDeputy Earl MarshalDeputy Marshal of England
Earl Marshal (alternatively Marschal or Marischal) is a hereditary royal officeholder and chivalric title under the sovereign of the United Kingdom used in England (then, following the Act of Union 1800, in the United Kingdom).wikipedia
345 Related Articles

Lord High Constable of England

Lord High ConstableConstable of EnglandConstable
He is the eighth of the Great Officers of State in the United Kingdom, ranking beneath the Lord High Constable and above the Lord High Admiral.
The Lord High Constable of England is the seventh of the Great Officers of State, ranking beneath the Lord Great Chamberlain and above the Earl Marshal.

State funerals in the United Kingdom

state funeralstate funeralsceremonial funeral
As a result of the decline of chivalry and sociocultural change, the position of Earl Marshal has evolved and among his responsibilities today is the organisation of major ceremonial state occasions like the monarch's coronation in Westminster Abbey and state funerals.
In the United Kingdom, a state funeral is usually reserved for a monarch and the Earl Marshal is in charge.

College of Arms

Royal LicenceCollege of HeraldsThe College of Arms
He is also a leading officer of arms and oversees the College of Arms. When chivalry declined in importance, the constable's post declined and the Earl Marshal became the head of the College of Arms, the body concerned with all matters of genealogy and heraldry.
The entire corporation is overseen by the Earl Marshal, a hereditary office held by the Duke of Norfolk, currently Edward Fitzalan-Howard, 18th Duke of Norfolk.

Great Officer of State

Great Officers of StateRoyal householdGreat Office
He is the eighth of the Great Officers of State in the United Kingdom, ranking beneath the Lord High Constable and above the Lord High Admiral.
The marshal of England assumed the place of the constable of England in the royal palace in the command of the royal armies.

Duke of Norfolk

Dukes of NorfolkDukedom of NorfolkDuke of Norfolk (1483)
After passing through his daughter's husband to the Earls of Norfolk, the post evolved into "Earl Marshal" and the title remained unchanged, even after the earldom of Norfolk became a dukedom.
The Duke of Norfolk is, moreover, the Earl Marshal and Hereditary Marshal of England.

High Court of Chivalry

Court of ChivalryChivalrylaws
In conjunction with the Lord High Constable, he had held a court, known as the Court of Chivalry, for the administration of justice in accordance with the law of arms, which was concerned with many subjects relating to military matters, such as ransom, booty and soldiers' wages, and including the misuse of armorial bearings.
The sole judge is now the hereditary Earl Marshal of England, the Duke of Norfolk, though if not a professional lawyer, he normally appoints a professional lawyer as his lieutenant or surrogate.

Earl Marischal

Earl Marischal (1458)MarischalWilliam Keith, 3rd Earl Marischal
There was formerly an Earl Marshal of Ireland and Earl Marischal of Scotland.
The role of regulation of heraldry carried out by the English Earl Marshal is carried out in Scotland by the Lord Lyon King of Arms.

Earl of Norfolk

Earl of Norfolk (1140)Earl of Norfolk (1312)earldom of Norfolk
After passing through his daughter's husband to the Earls of Norfolk, the post evolved into "Earl Marshal" and the title remained unchanged, even after the earldom of Norfolk became a dukedom.
Due to the Bigods' descent in the female line from William Marshal, they inherited the hereditary office of Earl Marshal, still held by the Dukes of Norfolk today.

Law of heraldic arms

law of armsLaws of Armsare protected by law
In conjunction with the Lord High Constable, he had held a court, known as the Court of Chivalry, for the administration of justice in accordance with the law of arms, which was concerned with many subjects relating to military matters, such as ransom, booty and soldiers' wages, and including the misuse of armorial bearings.
In England, Wales and Northern Ireland, the authority to grant arms is delegated to the Kings of Arms of the College of Arms, under the direction of the Earl Marshal.

Heraldry

heraldicheraldistarms
When chivalry declined in importance, the constable's post declined and the Earl Marshal became the head of the College of Arms, the body concerned with all matters of genealogy and heraldry.
The college currently consists of three Kings of Arms, assisted by six Heralds, and four Pursuivants, or junior officers of arms, all under the authority of the Earl Marshal; but all of the arms granted by the college are granted by the authority of the crown.

Lord Great Chamberlain

master chamberlainLord Great Chamberlain of EnglandAmiredjibi
The exception is the office of Lord Great Chamberlain, which is notionally higher than Earl Marshal and also hereditary, but as it is currently held by a marquess (Marquess of Cholmondeley), is consequently lower in the general order of precedence.
The House of Lords Act 1999 removed the automatic right of hereditary peers to sit in the House of Lords, but the Act provided that a hereditary peer exercising the office of Lord Great Chamberlain (as well as the Earl Marshal) be exempt from such a rule, in order to perform ceremonial functions.

William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke

William MarshalWilliam MarshallWilliam Marshal, Earl of Pembroke
In England, the office became hereditary under John FitzGilbert the Marshal (served c.1130–1165) after The Anarchy, and rose in prominence under his second son, William Marshal, later Earl of Pembroke.
Because he was an Earl, and also known as the Marshal, the term "Earl Marshal" was commonly used and this later became an established hereditary title in the English Peerage.

Anselm Marshal

6th
Anselm Marshal, 6th Earl of Pembroke 1245
Had he lived longer, he would have become Earl of Pembroke and Earl Marshal upon the death of his brother Walter on 24 November 1245.

Nicholas Seagrave

Nicolas de Seagrave
Nicholas Seagrave 1308–1316
Nicholas Seagrave (after 1256 – 25 November 1321), lord of Stowe in Northamptonshire, was Marshal of England from 1308 to 1316.

Marshal

city marshalmarshalstown marshal
The office of royal marshal existed in much of Europe, involving managing horses and protecting the monarch.
This office was often made hereditary in the high nobility, e.g., the English Earl Marshal, or the Scots Earl Marischal.

Thomas de Morley, 4th Baron Morley

Thomas de Morley, 4th Baron Morley (died 1416)
Thomas de Morley, 4th Baron Morley, KG (c. 1354 – 24 September 1416) was a baron in the Peerage of England, Lord of Morley, Hingham, Hockering, &c., in Norfolk, de jure Lord Marshall, hereditary Earl Marshal of Ireland, and a Privy Councillor.

Henry Percy, 1st Earl of Northumberland

Earl of NorthumberlandHenry PercyHenry Percy, Earl of Northumberland
Henry Percy, Lord Percy 1377
Henry Percy, 1st Earl of Northumberland, 4th Baron Percy, titular King of Mann, KG, Lord Marshal (10 November 1341 – 20 February 1408) was the son of Henry de Percy, 3rd Baron Percy, and a descendant of Henry III of England.

John FitzAlan, 1st Baron Arundel

John FitzalanSir John ArundelSir John FitzAlan
John FitzAlan, 1st Baron Arundel, Lord Maltravers 1377–1383 (died 1379)
John FitzAlan (D' Arundel), 1st Baron Arundel (c. 1348 – 16 December 1379) was a Lord Marshal or Marshal of England.

Coat of arms

armscoat-of-armscoats of arms
In conjunction with the Lord High Constable, he had held a court, known as the Court of Chivalry, for the administration of justice in accordance with the law of arms, which was concerned with many subjects relating to military matters, such as ransom, booty and soldiers' wages, and including the misuse of armorial bearings.
In reference to a dispute over the exercise of authority over the Officers of Arms in England, Arthur Annesley, 1st Earl of Anglesey, Lord Privy Seal, declared on 16 June 1673 that the powers of the Earl Marshal were "to order, judge, and determine all matters touching arms, ensigns of nobility, honour, and chivalry; to make laws, ordinances, and statutes for the good government of the Officers of Arms; to nominate Officers to fill vacancies in the College of Arms; to punish and correct Officers of Arms for misbehaviour in the execution of their places".

Coronation of the British monarch

coronationcrownedcoronations
As a result of the decline of chivalry and sociocultural change, the position of Earl Marshal has evolved and among his responsibilities today is the organisation of major ceremonial state occasions like the monarch's coronation in Westminster Abbey and state funerals.
Garter Principal King of Arms, the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Lord Chancellor, the Lord Great Chamberlain, the Lord High Constable and the Earl Marshal go to the east, south, west and north of the coronation theatre.

Richard Marshal, 3rd Earl of Pembroke

RichardRichard MarshalRichard Marshal, Earl of Pembroke
Richard Marshal, 3rd Earl of Pembroke 1231–1234
Richard Marshal, 3rd Earl of Pembroke (119116 April 1234), was the son of William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke and brother of William Marshal, 2nd Earl of Pembroke, whom he succeeded to the Earldom of Pembroke and Lord Marshal of England upon his brother's death on 6 April 1231.

Roger Bigod, 4th Earl of Norfolk

his uncleEarl of NorfolkLe Conte de Norffolk
Roger Bigod, 4th Earl of Norfolk 1245–1269
Roger Bigod (c. 1209–1270) was 4th Earl of Norfolk and Marshal of England.

Ralph Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland

Ralph NevilleEarl of WestmorlandEarl of Westmoreland
Ralph Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland Earl Marshal (c. 1364 – 21 October 1425), was an English nobleman of the House of Neville.

Thomas de Mowbray, 1st Duke of Norfolk

Thomas MowbrayThomas Mowbray, Duke of NorfolkThomas de Mowbray
Thomas Mowbray, 1st Earl of Nottingham 1385–1386
Thomas de Mowbray, 1st Duke of Norfolk, 1st Earl of Nottingham, 3rd Earl of Norfolk, 6th Baron Mowbray, 7th Baron Segrave, KG, Earl Marshal (22 March 1366 – 22 September 1399) was an English peer.

Margaret, Duchess of Norfolk

MargaretMargaret, 2nd Countess of NorfolkMargaret of Brotherton
Margaret, Duchess of Norfolk 1338–1377
In 1338, she succeeded to the earldom of Norfolk and the office of Earl Marshal.