Early Cyrillic alphabet

Early CyrillicCyrillicOld CyrillicCyrillic alphabetSlavic alphabetCyrillic alphabet, earlyCyrillic scriptChurch CyrillicCyrillic alphabet.early Cyrillic writing
The Early Cyrillic alphabet is a writing system that was developed in the First Bulgarian Empire during the late 9th century on the basis of the Greek alphabet for the Slavic peoples living near the Byzantine Empire in South East and Central Europe.wikipedia
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First Bulgarian Empire

Bulgarian EmpireBulgariaBulgarian
The Early Cyrillic alphabet is a writing system that was developed in the First Bulgarian Empire during the late 9th century on the basis of the Greek alphabet for the Slavic peoples living near the Byzantine Empire in South East and Central Europe. It was developed in the Preslav Literary School in the capital city of the First Bulgarian Empire in order to write the Old Church Slavonic language (called also Old Bulgarian).
Its leading cultural position was further consolidated with the invention of the Glagolitic and Early Cyrillic alphabets shortly after in the capital Preslav, and literature produced in Old Bulgarian soon began spreading north.

Cyrillic script

CyrillicCyrillic alphabetUzbek Cyrillic
The modern Cyrillic script is still used primarily for some Slavic languages (such as Bulgarian, Serbian, Russian and Ukrainian), and for East European and Asian languages that have experienced a great amount of Russian cultural influence.
In the 9th century AD the Bulgarian Tsar Simeon I the Great, following the cultural and political course of his father Boris I, commissioned a new Bulgarian script, the Early Cyrillic alphabet, to be made at the Preslav Literary School in the First Bulgarian Empire which would replace the Glagolitic script, produced earlier by Saints Cyril and Methodius and the same disciples that created the new Slavic script in Bulgaria.

Old Church Slavonic

Old BulgarianSlavonicOld Slavonic
It was developed in the Preslav Literary School in the capital city of the First Bulgarian Empire in order to write the Old Church Slavonic language (called also Old Bulgarian).
See Early Cyrillic alphabet for a detailed description of the script and information about the sounds it originally expressed.

A (Cyrillic)

АА аCyrillic letter A
In the Early Cyrillic alphabet its name was (azǔ), meaning "I".

Dze

ЅЅ ѕ
It is derived from the letter dzelo or zelo of the Early Cyrillic alphabet, and it was used historically for Old Church Slavonic, Ukrainian, Russian, and Romanian.

Ge (Cyrillic)

ГГ гGe
In the Early Cyrillic alphabet, its name was (glagoli), meaning "speak".

I (Cyrillic)

ИИ иCyrillic letter I
The name of the Cyrillic letter І in the Early Cyrillic alphabet was (iže), meaning "which".

Zhe (Cyrillic)

ЖЖ жZhe
In the Early Cyrillic alphabet the name of Zhe was (živěte), meaning "live" (imperative).

Ve (Cyrillic)

ВВ вVe
In the Early Cyrillic alphabet, its name was (vědě), meaning "I know".

De (Cyrillic)

ДД дDe
In the Early Cyrillic alphabet its name was (dobro), meaning "good".

Be (Cyrillic)

ББ бbe
In the Early Cyrillic alphabet the name of the letter Be was (buky/ буки ), meaning "letter".

Ka (Cyrillic)

КК кCyrillic letter Ka
In the Early Cyrillic alphabet its name was (kako), meaning "as".

Saints Cyril and Methodius

Cyril and MethodiusMethodiusCyril
The Glagolitic alphabet was created by the monk Saint Cyril, possibly with the aid of his brother Saint Methodius, around 863.
The early Cyrillic alphabet was developed in the First Bulgarian Empire and later finalized and spread by disciples Kliment and Naum in the Ohrid and Preslav schools of Tsar Boris I of Bulgaria as a simplification of the Glagolitic alphabet which more closely resembled the Greek alphabet.

Ze (Cyrillic)

ЗЗ зZe
In the Early Cyrillic alphabet its name was (zemlja), meaning "earth".

Church Slavonic language

Church SlavonicSlavonicChurch Slavic
Today, the early orthography and typesetting standards only remain in use in Church Slavonic.
These modified varieties or recensions (e.g. Serbian Church Slavonic, Russian Church Slavonic, Ukrainian Church Slavonic in Early Cyrillic script, Croatian Church Slavonic in Croatian angular Glagolitic and later in Latin script, Czech Church Slavonic, Slovak Church Slavonic in Latin script, Bulgarian Church Slavonic in Early Cyrillic and Bulgarian Glagolitic scripts, etc.) eventually stabilized and their regularized forms were used by the scribes to produce new translations of liturgical material from Koine Greek, or Latin in the case of Croatian Church Slavonic.

Russian language

RussianRussian-languageRussian:
The modern Cyrillic script is still used primarily for some Slavic languages (such as Bulgarian, Serbian, Russian and Ukrainian), and for East European and Asian languages that have experienced a great amount of Russian cultural influence.
In addition to the modern Russian alphabet, Unicode (and thus UTF-8) encodes the Early Cyrillic alphabet (which is very similar to the Greek alphabet), as well as all other Slavic and non-Slavic but Cyrillic-based alphabets.

O (Cyrillic)

ОО оO
The name of O in the Early Cyrillic alphabet was (onŭ), meaning "he" or "it".

En (Cyrillic)

НН нCyrillic letter En
The name of En in the Early Cyrillic alphabet was (našĭ), meaning "ours".

Izhitsa

ѴѴ ѵѶ
Izhitsa (Ѵ, ѵ; italics: Ѵ ѵ ; OCS: Ѷжица, И́жица) is a letter of the early Cyrillic alphabet and several later alphabets, usually the last in the row.

El (Cyrillic)

ЛЛ лEl
In the Early Cyrillic alphabet its name was (ljudije), meaning "people".

Uk (Cyrillic)

UkѸ
Uk (Оу оу; italics: Оу оу) is a digraph of the early Cyrillic alphabet, although commonly considered and used as a single letter.

Pe (Cyrillic)

ПП пCyrillic letter Pe
The name of Pe in the Early Cyrillic alphabet was (pokoi), meaning "peaceful state".

Omega (Cyrillic)

omegaѠCyrillic Omega
Omega (Ѡ ѡ or Ѡ ѡ ; italics: Ѡ ѡ or Ѡ ѡ ) is a letter used in the early Cyrillic alphabet.

Preslav Literary School

PreslavPliska Literary Schoolliterature
It was developed in the Preslav Literary School in the capital city of the First Bulgarian Empire in order to write the Old Church Slavonic language (called also Old Bulgarian).

Bulgarian Empire

BulgariaBulgarianmedieval Bulgaria
One possibility is that this systematization of Cyrillic was undertaken at the Council of Preslav in 893, when the Old Church Slavonic liturgy was adopted by the Bulgarian Empire.