Early skyscrapers

skyscraperearly skyscraperfirst skyscraperearly American skyscraperearly steel frame skyscrapersfirst skyscrapersskycraperskyscraper boomskyscraper eraskyscrapers
The early skyscrapers were a range of tall commercial buildings built between 1884 and 1945, predominantly in the American cities of New York City and Chicago.wikipedia
283 Related Articles

Woolworth Building

WoolworthWoolworth Building, First Floor InteriorWoolworth tower
Iconic buildings such as the Flatiron were followed by the 612 ft tall Singer Tower, the 700 ft Metropolitan Life Insurance Company Tower and the 792 ft Woolworth Building.
The Woolworth Building is an early American skyscraper located at 233 Broadway in Manhattan, New York City.

Home Insurance Building

first skyscraperHome Insurance Company Building
These made it both technically and commercially viable to build a new class of taller buildings, the first of which, Chicago's 138 ft tall Home Insurance Building, opened in 1885.
The Home Insurance Building was a skyscraper in Chicago, United States, designed by William Le Baron Jenney in 1884, for the Home Insurance Company in New York.

Chrysler Building

Chrysler405 Lexington AvenueChrysler Building, Ground Floor Interior
Skyscraper heights continued to grow, with the Chrysler and the Empire State Building each claiming new records, reaching 1,046 ft and 1250 ft respectively.
The Chrysler Building is an Art Deco–style skyscraper located in the Turtle Bay neighborhood on the East Side of Manhattan, New York City, near Midtown Manhattan, at the intersection of 42nd Street and Lexington Avenue.

Empire State Building

The Empire State BuildingEmpire State350 Fifth Avenue
Skyscraper heights continued to grow, with the Chrysler and the Empire State Building each claiming new records, reaching 1,046 ft and 1250 ft respectively.
The Empire State Building is a 102-story Art Deco skyscraper in Midtown Manhattan, New York City.

Chicago

Chicago, IllinoisChicago, ILCity of Chicago
The early skyscrapers were a range of tall commercial buildings built between 1884 and 1945, predominantly in the American cities of New York City and Chicago.
In 1885, the first steel-framed high-rise building, the Home Insurance Building, rose in the city as Chicago ushered in the skyscraper era, which would then be followed by many other cities around the world.

Skyscraper

skyscraperssupertallsupertall skyscraper
The early skyscrapers were a range of tall commercial buildings built between 1884 and 1945, predominantly in the American cities of New York City and Chicago.
Skyscraper projects after World War II typically rejected the classical designs of the early skyscrapers, instead embracing the uniform international style; many older skyscrapers were redesigned to suit contemporary tastes or even demolished—such as New York's Singer Building, once the world's tallest skyscraper.

Tacoma Building (Chicago)

Tacoma Building
In 1889 the Tacoma Building replaced the bolted metal design with a stronger riveted approach, and Chicago's Chamber of Commerce Building introduced interior light courts to the structural design of skyscrapers.
The Tacoma Building is an early skyscraper in Chicago.

Chicago school (architecture)

Chicago SchoolCommercial styleChicago style
Sometimes termed the products of the Chicago school of architecture, these skyscrapers attempted to balance aesthetic concerns with practical commercial design, producing large, square palazzo-styled buildings hosting shops and restaurants on the ground level and containing rentable offices on the upper floors.
The Home Insurance Building, which some regarded as the first skyscraper in the world, was built in Chicago in 1885 and was demolished in 1931.

American Surety Building

American Surety Company100 BroadwayAmerican Surety Company Building
Finally, in 1895 a breakthrough was made with the construction of the American Surety Building, a twenty-story, 303 ft high-steel development that broke Chicago's height record.
The American Surety Building is a historic skyscraper located at 100 Broadway, in the Financial District of Manhattan, New York City, north of Trinity Church.

Prudential (Guaranty) Building

Guaranty BuildingPrudential (Guaranty) Building (Buffalo, New York)Guaranty Building (Prudential Building)
A few early skyscrapers were also constructed in Baltimore, Boston, Pittsburgh, St. Louis, Rochester, and Buffalo, such as the Wainwright Building, Wilder Building, and Guaranty Building.
The Guaranty Building, formerly called the Prudential Building, is an early skyscraper in Buffalo, New York.

Wainwright Building

A few early skyscrapers were also constructed in Baltimore, Boston, Pittsburgh, St. Louis, Rochester, and Buffalo, such as the Wainwright Building, Wilder Building, and Guaranty Building.
The Wainwright Building is considered the first expression of high rise as a tall building early skyscrapers.

Cass Gilbert

Architect Cass Gilbert designs included a very high proportion of usable – and thus rentable – floor space, with a great deal of light and a flexible floor plan that could be subdivided for different tenants.
An early proponent of skyscrapers, his works include the Woolworth Building, the United States Supreme Court building, the state capitols of Minnesota, Arkansas and West Virginia; and the Saint Louis Art Museum and Public Library.

Wilder Building

A few early skyscrapers were also constructed in Baltimore, Boston, Pittsburgh, St. Louis, Rochester, and Buffalo, such as the Wainwright Building, Wilder Building, and Guaranty Building.
It is considered Rochester's first modern skyscraper, and is considered to be among the oldest of the early skyscrapers.

Equitable Building (Manhattan)

Equitable Building120 BroadwayBankers Club
The campaign for change was helped by the construction of the Equitable Building in 1915 at the estimated cost of $29 million ($10.9 billion in 2010 terms), which rapidly became infamous as its vast height and bulk blocked views cast neighbours into permanent shade.
The skyscraper was designed by Ernest R. Graham—the successor to D. H. Burnham & Company —with Peirce Anderson as the architect-in-charge.

Metropolitan Life Insurance Company Tower

Met Life TowerMetLife TowerMetropolitan Life Tower
Iconic buildings such as the Flatiron were followed by the 612 ft tall Singer Tower, the 700 ft Metropolitan Life Insurance Company Tower and the 792 ft Woolworth Building.

Singer Building

Singer TowerSinger
Iconic buildings such as the Flatiron were followed by the 612 ft tall Singer Tower, the 700 ft Metropolitan Life Insurance Company Tower and the 792 ft Woolworth Building.

Monadnock Building

MonadnockMonadnock Block
Some buildings, such as The Rookery and the Monadnock Building, combined elements of both the newer and older styles, but generally Chicago rapidly adopted steel structures as a flexible and effective way to produce a range of tall buildings.
The Monadnock belongs to the Printing House Row District, a National Historic Landmark which includes the Manhattan Building, the Old Colony Building, and the Fisher Building, some of Chicago's seminal early skyscrapers.

Rookery Building

The RookeryRookeryThe Rookery Building
Some buildings, such as The Rookery and the Monadnock Building, combined elements of both the newer and older styles, but generally Chicago rapidly adopted steel structures as a flexible and effective way to produce a range of tall buildings.

Masonic Temple (Chicago)

Masonic TempleMasonic Temple BuildingMasonic Temple (Chicago, Illinois)
The Masonic Temple was the most prominent of these skyscrapers.

Broad Exchange Building

25 Broad Street
Some were relatively conservative buildings in a classical style, such as the Mutual Life, Atlantic Mutual, and Broad Exchange Buildings, all designed by Clinton and Russell.

Rand McNally Building

1899 headquarters
The 1890 Rand McNally Building became the first entirely self-supporting, steel-framed skyscraper.
* Early skyscrapers

List of early skyscrapers

This list of early skyscrapers details a range of tall, commercial buildings built between 1884 and 1930s, predominantly in the U.S. cities of New York and Chicago but also across the rest of the U.S. and in many other parts of the world.

Continental Illinois

Continental Illinois National Bank and Trust CompanyContinental Illinois National BankContinental Illinois Bank
The resulting skyscrapers reflected these debates: the Railway Exchange, the Peoples Gas and the Illinois Continental and Commercial Bank Buildings were each substantial, quarter-block wide palazzo cubes of common height, their facades divided into a classical tripartite design, and sporting classical columns and other features.

Atlantic Mutual Insurance Company

Atlantic MutualAtlantic Mutual Insurance Companies
Some were relatively conservative buildings in a classical style, such as the Mutual Life, Atlantic Mutual, and Broad Exchange Buildings, all designed by Clinton and Russell.

Railway Exchange Building (Chicago)

Railway Exchange BuildingSanta Fe BuildingSanta Fe Building (Chicago)
The resulting skyscrapers reflected these debates: the Railway Exchange, the Peoples Gas and the Illinois Continental and Commercial Bank Buildings were each substantial, quarter-block wide palazzo cubes of common height, their facades divided into a classical tripartite design, and sporting classical columns and other features.
*Early skyscrapers